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President Obama signs into law H.R. 2901, the “Senator Paul Simon Water for the World Act of 2014,”

Sat, 27Dec2014 Comments off

sources: https://www.congress.gov/bill/113th-congress/house-bill/2901 and http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/12/19/statement-press-secretary-statement-press-secretary-hr-1068-hr-2754-hr-2AT THE SECOND SESSIONBegun and held at the City of Washington on Friday,
the third day of January, two thousand and fourteen

To strengthen implementation of the Senator Paul Simon Water for the Poor Act of 2005 by improving the capacity of the United States Government to implement, leverage, and monitor and evaluate programs to provide first-time or improved access to safe drinking water, sanitation, and hygiene to the world’s poorest on an equitable and sustainable basis, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This Act may be cited as the “Senator Paul Simon Water for the World Act of 2014”.

SEC. 2. SENSE OF CONGRESS.

It is the sense of Congress that—

(1) water and sanitation are critically important resources that impact many other aspects of human life; and

(2) the United States should be a global leader in helping provide sustainable access to clean water and sanitation for the world’s most vulnerable populations.

SEC. 3. CLARIFICATION OF ASSISTANCE TO PROVIDE SAFE WATER AND SANITATION TO INCLUDE HYGIENE.

Chapter 1 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended—

(1) by redesignating section 135 (22 U.S.C. 2152h), as added by section 5(a) of the Senator Paul Simon Water for the Poor Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–121; 22 U.S.C. 2152h note), as section 136; and

(2) in section 136, as redesignated—

(A) in the section heading, by striking “AND SANITATION” and inserting “, SANITATION, AND HYGIENE”; and

(B) in subsection (b), by striking “and sanitation” and inserting “, sanitation, and hygiene”.

SEC. 4. IMPROVING COORDINATION AND OVERSIGHT OF SAFE WATER, SANITATION AND HYGIENE PROJECTS AND ACTIVITIES.

Section 136 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as redesignated and amended by this Act, is further amended by adding at the end the following:

“(e) Coordination And Oversight.—

“(1) USAID GLOBAL WATER COORDINATOR.—

“(A) DESIGNATION.—The Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development (referred to in this paragraph as ‘USAID’) or the Administrator’s designee, who shall be a current USAID employee serving in a career or non-career position in the Senior Executive Service or at the level of a Deputy Assistant Administrator or higher, shall serve concurrently as the USAID Global Water Coordinator (referred to in this subsection as the ‘Coordinator’).

“(B) SPECIFIC DUTIES.—The Coordinator shall—

“(i) provide direction and guidance to, coordinate, and oversee the projects and programs of USAID authorized under this section;

“(ii) lead the implementation and revision, not less frequently than once every 5 years, of USAID’s portion of the Global Water Strategy required under subsection (j);

“(iii) seek—

“(I) to expand the capacity of USAID, subject to the availability of appropriations, including through the designation of a lead subject matter expert selected from among USAID staff in each high priority country designated pursuant to subsection (h);

“(II) to implement such programs and activities;

“(III) to take advantage of economies of scale; and

“(IV) to conduct more efficient and effective projects and programs;

“(iv) coordinate with the Department of State and USAID staff in each high priority country designated pursuant to subsection (h) to ensure that USAID activities and projects, USAID program planning and budgeting documents, and USAID country development strategies reflect and seek to implement—

“(I) the safe water, sanitation, and hygiene objectives established in the strategy required under subsection (j), including objectives relating to the management of water resources; and

“(II) international best practices relating to—

“(aa) increasing access to safe water and sanitation;

“(bb) conducting hygiene-related activities; and

“(cc) ensuring appropriate management of water resources; and

“(v) develop appropriate benchmarks, measurable goals, performance metrics, and monitoring and evaluation plans for USAID projects and programs authorized under this section.

“(2) DEPARTMENT OF STATE SPECIAL COORDINATOR FOR WATER RESOURCES.—

“(A) DESIGNATION.—The Secretary of State or the Secretary’s designee, who shall be a current employee of the Department of State serving in a career or non-career position in the Senior Executive Service or at the level of a Deputy Assistant Secretary or higher, shall serve concurrently as the Department of State Special Advisor for Water Resources (referred to in this paragraph as the ‘Special Advisor’).

“(B) SPECIFIC DUTIES.—The Special Advisor shall—

“(i) provide direction and guidance to, coordinate, and oversee the projects and programs of the Department of State authorized under this section;

“(ii) lead the implementation and revision, not less than every 5 years, of the Department of State’s portion of the Global Water Strategy required under subsection (j);

“(iii) prioritize and coordinate the Department of State’s international engagement on the allocation, distribution, and access to global fresh water resources and policies related to such matters;

“(iv) coordinate with United States Agency for International Development and Department of State staff in each high priority country designated pursuant to subsection (h) to ensure that United States diplomatic efforts related to safe water, sanitation, and hygiene, including efforts related to management of water resources and watersheds and the resolution of intra- and trans-boundary conflicts over water resources, are consistent with United States national interests; and

“(v) represent the views of the United States Government on the allocation, distribution, and access to global fresh water resources and policies related to such matters in key international fora, including key diplomatic, development-related, and scientific organizations.

“(3) ADDITIONAL NATURE OF DUTIES AND RESTRICTION ON ADDITIONAL OR SUPPLEMENTAL COMPENSATION.—The responsibilities and specific duties of the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development (or the Administrator’s designee) and the Secretary of State (or the Secretary’s designee) under paragraph (2) or (3), respectively, shall be in addition to any other responsibilities or specific duties assigned to such individuals. Such individuals shall receive no additional or supplemental compensation as a result of carrying out such responsibilities and specific duties under such paragraphs.”.

SEC. 5. PROMOTING THE MAXIMUM IMPACT AND LONG-TERM SUSTAINABILITY OF USAID SAFE WATER, SANITATION, AND HYGIENE-RELATED PROJECTS AND PROGRAMS.

Section 136 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as redesignated and amended by this Act, is further amended by adding at the end the following:

“(f) Priorities And Criteria For Maximum Impact And Long-Term Sustainability.—The Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development shall ensure that the Agency for International Development’s projects and programs authorized under this section are designed to achieve maximum impact and long-term sustainability by—

“(1) prioritizing countries on the basis of the following clearly defined criteria and indicators, to the extent sufficient empirical data are available—

“(A) the proportion of the population using an unimproved drinking water source;

“(B) the total population using an unimproved drinking water source;

“(C) the proportion of the population without piped water access;

“(D) the proportion of the population using shared or other unimproved sanitation facilities;

“(E) the total population using shared or other unimproved sanitation facilities;

“(F) the proportion of the population practicing open defecation;

“(G) the total number of children younger than 5 years of age who died from diarrheal disease;

“(H) the proportion of all deaths of children younger than 5 years of age resulting from diarrheal disease;

“(I) the national government’s capacity, capability, and commitment to work with the United States to improve access to safe water, sanitation, and hygiene, including—

“(i) the government’s capacity and commitment to developing the indigenous capacity to provide safe water and sanitation without the assistance of outside donors; and

“(ii) the degree to which such government—

“(I) identifies such efforts as a priority; and

“(II) allocates resources to such efforts;

“(J) the availability of opportunities to leverage existing public, private, or other donor investments in the water, sanitation, and hygiene sectors, including investments in the management of water resources; and

“(K) the likelihood of making significant improvements on a per capita basis on the health and educational opportunities available to women as a result of increased access to safe water, sanitation, and hygiene, including access to appropriate facilities at primary and secondary educational institutions seeking to ensure that communities benefitting from such projects and activities develop the indigenous capacity to provide safe water and sanitation without the assistance of outside donors;

“(2) prioritizing and measuring, including through rigorous monitoring and evaluating mechanisms, the extent to which such project or program—

“(A) furthers significant improvements in—

“(i) the criteria set forth in subparagraphs (A) through (H) of paragraph (1);

“(ii) the health and educational opportunities available to women as a result of increased access to safe water, sanitation, and hygiene, including access to appropriate facilities at primary and secondary educational institutions; and

“(iii) the indigenous capacity of the host nation or community to provide safe water and sanitation without the assistance of outside donors;

“(B) is designed, as part of the provision of safe water and sanitation to the local community—

“(i) to be financially independent over the long term, focusing on local ownership and sustainability;

“(ii) to be undertaken in conjunction with relevant public institutions or private enterprises;

“(iii) to identify and empower local individuals or institutions to be responsible for the effective management and maintenance of such project or program; and

“(iv) to provide safe water or expertise or capacity building to those identified parties or institutions for the purposes of developing a plan and clear responsibilities for the effective management and maintenance of such project or program;

“(C) leverages existing public, private, or other donor investments in the water, sanitation, and hygiene sectors, including investments in the management of water resources;

“(D) avoids duplication of efforts with other United States Government agencies or departments or those of other nations or nongovernmental organizations;

“(E) coordinates such efforts with the efforts of other United States Government agencies or departments or those of other nations or nongovernmental organizations directed at assisting refugees and other displaced individuals; and

“(F) involves consultation with appropriate stakeholders, including communities directly affected by the lack of access to clean water, sanitation or hygiene, and other appropriate nongovernmental organizations; and

“(3) seeking to further the strategy required under subsection (j) after 2018.

“(g) Use Of Current And Improved Empirical Data Collection And Review Of New Standardized Indicators.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—The Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development is authorized to use current and improved empirical data collection—

“(A) to meet the health-based prioritization criteria established pursuant to subsection (f)(1); and

“(B) to review new standardized indicators in evaluating progress towards meeting such criteria.

“(2) CONSULTATION AND NOTICE.—The Administrator shall—

“(A) regularly consult with the appropriate congressional committees; and

“(B) notify such committees not later than 30 days before using current or improved empirical data collection for the review of any new standardized indicators under paragraph (1) for the purposes of carrying out this section.

“(h) Designation Of High Priority Countries.—

“(1) INITIAL DESIGNATION.—Not later than October 1, 2015, the President shall—

“(A) designate, on the basis of the criteria set forth in subsection (f)(1) not fewer than 10 countries as high priority countries to be the primary recipients of United States Government assistance authorized under this section during fiscal year 2016; and

“(B) notify the appropriate congressional committees of such designations.

“(2) ANNUAL DESIGNATIONS.—

“(A) IN GENERAL.—Except as provided in subparagraph (B), the President shall annually make new designations pursuant to the criteria set forth in paragraph (1).

“(B) DESIGNATIONS AFTER FISCAL YEAR 2018.—Beginning with fiscal year 2019, designations under paragraph (1) shall be made—

“(i) based upon the criteria set forth in subsection (f)(1); and

“(ii) in furtherance of the strategy required under subsection (j).

“(i) Targeting Of Projects And Programs To Areas Of Greatest Need.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 15 days before the obligation of any funds for water, sanitation, or hygiene projects or programs pursuant to this section in countries that are not ranked in the top 50 countries based upon the WASH Needs Index, the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development shall notify the appropriate congressional committees of the planned obligation of such funds.

“(2) DEFINED TERM.—In this subsection and in subsection (j), the term ‘WASH Needs Index’ means the needs index for water, sanitation, or hygiene projects or programs authorized under this section that has been developed using the criteria and indicators described in subparagraphs (A) through (H) of subsection (f)(1).”.

SEC. 6. UNITED STATES STRATEGY TO INCREASE APPROPRIATE LONG-TERM SUSTAINABILITY AND ACCESS TO SAFE WATER, SANITATION, AND HYGIENE.

(a) In General.—Section 136 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as redesignated and amended by this Act, is further amended by adding at the end the following:

“(j) Global Water Strategy.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than October 1, 2017, October 1, 2022, and October 1, 2027, the President, acting through the Secretary of State, the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development, and the heads of other Federal departments and agencies, as appropriate, shall submit a single government-wide Global Water Strategy to the appropriate congressional committees that provides a detailed description of how the United States intends—

“(A) to increase access to safe water, sanitation, and hygiene in high priority countries designated pursuant to subsection (h), including a summary of the WASH Needs Index and the specific weighting of empirical data and other definitions used to develop and rank countries on the WASH Needs Index;

“(B) to improve the management of water resources and watersheds in such countries; and

“(C) to work to prevent and resolve, to the greatest degree possible, both intra- and trans-boundary conflicts over water resources in such countries.

“(2) AGENCY-SPECIFIC PLANS.—The Global Water Strategy shall include an agency-specific plan—

“(A) from the United States Agency for International Development that describes specifically how the Agency for International Development will—

“(i) carry out the duties and responsibilities assigned to the Global Water Coordinator under subsection (e)(1);

“(ii) ensure that the Agency for International Development’s projects and programs authorized under this section are designed to achieve maximum impact and long-term sustainability, including by implementing the requirements described in subsection (f); and

“(iii) increase access to safe water, sanitation, and hygiene in high priority countries designated pursuant to subsection (h);

“(B) from the Department of State that describes specifically how the Department of State will—

“(i) carry out the duties and responsibilities assigned to the Special Coordinator for Water Resources under subsection (e)(2); and

“(ii) ensure that the Department’s activities authorized under this section are designed—

“(I) to improve management of water resources and watersheds in countries designated pursuant to subsection (h); and

“(II) to prevent and resolve, to the greatest degree possible, both intra- and trans-boundary conflicts over water resources in such countries; and

“(C) from other Federal departments and agencies, as appropriate, that describes the contributions of the departments and agencies to implementing the Global Water Strategy.

“(3) INDIVIDUALIZED PLANS FOR HIGH PRIORITY COUNTRIES.—For each high priority country designated pursuant to subsection (h), the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development shall—

“(A) develop a costed, evidence-based, and results-oriented plan that—

“(i) seeks to achieve the purposes of this section; and

“(ii) meets the requirements under subsection (f); and

“(B) include such plan in an appendix to the Global Water Strategy required under paragraph (1).

“(4) FIRST TIME ACCESS REPORTING REQUIREMENT.—The Global Water Strategy shall specifically describe the target percentage of funding for each fiscal year covered by such strategy to be directed toward projects aimed at providing first-time access to safe water and sanitation.

“(5) PERFORMANCE INDICATORS.—The Global Water Strategy shall include specific and measurable goals, benchmarks, performance metrics, timetables, and monitoring and evaluation plans required to be developed by the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development pursuant to subsection (e)(1)(B)(v).

“(6) CONSULTATION AND BEST PRACTICES.—The Global Water Strategy shall—

“(A) be developed in consultation with the heads of other appropriate Federal departments and agencies; and

“(B) incorporate best practices from the international development community.

“(k) Definitions.—In this section—

“(1) the term ‘appropriate congressional committees’ means—

“(A) the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate;

“(B) the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate;

“(C) the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives; and

“(D) the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives; and

“(2) the term ‘long-term sustainability’ refers to the ability of a service delivery system, community, partner, or beneficiary to maintain, over time, any water, sanitation, or hygiene project that receives funding pursuant to the amendments made by the Senator Paul Simon Water for the World Act of 2014”..”.

(b) Department Of State Agency-Specific Plan.—Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit an agency-specific plan to the appropriate congressional committees (as defined in section 136(k) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as added by subsection (a)) that meets the requirements of section 136(j)(2)(B) of such Act, as added by subsection (a).

(c) Conforming Amendment.—Section 6 of the Senator Paul Simon Water for the Poor Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–121; 22 U.S.C. 2152h note) is repealed.

Attest:

Speaker of the House of Representatives.  

Attest:

Categories: hygiene, WASH, water, WatSan

Work With J-PAL : Accepting Applications for 96 Positions Starting 2015!

Mon, 17Nov2014 Comments off

 PRESS RELEASE

The Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) and partner organizations currently have 96 job opportunities available in 16 countries with more positions likely to become available by summer 2015.
J-PAL’s recruitment drive is an excellent opportunity to join us and our work to alleviate poverty. J-PAL is a network of 111 affiliated professors around the world who use randomized evaluations to answer questions critical to poverty alleviation. Started and based at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA, J-PAL also has six regional offices in Africa (South Africa), Europe (France), Latin America and the Caribbean (Chile), North America (USA), South Asia (India), and Southeast Asia (Indonesia). J-PAL affiliated professors employ research staff through their primary university and through organizations like J-PAL,Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA), IFMR Lead, Evidence for Policy Design (EPoD), Center for Effective Global Action (CEGA), Ideas 42, andthe Crime Lab.
Job Opportunities
 
Most positions are based outside of the US, but some positions are available at J-PAL in Cambridge, MA, at IPA in New Haven, CT, or at affiliates’ home institutions. Positions are full-time and most require a commitment of at least one year. J-PAL is looking to fill positions in five job categories:
Candidates applying to these positions must be open to various project types and geographic locations.
J-PAL and our partner organizations have openings for specific projects asResearch Associates and Research Managers. J-PAL’s Policy Group will also be recruiting new Associates and Managers. For a complete list of positions in Policy, Training, and Administration, please click here. More detailed descriptions of our position types may be found here
 
Complete the J-PAL common application, selecting the positions for which you would like to be considered. For most positions, you’ll need to submit a transcript, 2-3 letters of recommendation, a statement of purpose (cover letter), and a CV (resume) by January 6, 2015
 
Please also refer to J-PAL’s Jobs Page to find openings for specific positions, which may include additional application steps (usually sending a CV and cover letter to the specific hiring manager). 
 
Selection Process
 
All applications submitted during J-PAL’s 2014-2015 Winter Recruitment Drive, from November 17, 2014January 6, 2015, will become part of a common database for researchers and hiring managers seeking to fill positions beginning in the summer of 2015. Applicants who pre-qualify for a position will be contacted for interviews and for further information starting in February. Given the volume of applications J-PAL receives, only those selected for an interview will be contacted, and we are unable to provide feedback on specific applications.
 
In addition to the recruitment drive, J-PAL hires throughout the year as needed to fill staff positions. Applicants who are interested in immediate openings should consult J-PAL’s website for current vacancies and application instructions. 
 
For more information, please refer to our How to Apply page.
 
Feel free to share this information broadly. 
 
Sincerely, 
Ben Jaques-Leslie
J-PAL
Categories: WatSan

TED Talk: Francis de los Reyes: Sanitation is a basic human right

Sat, 25Oct2014 Comments off

Dr. Francis L. de los Reyes III is a Professor of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Associate Faculty of Microbiology, and Training Faculty of Biotechnology at North Carolina State University. His research focuses on biological processes and combines modeling, bioreactor experiments, and molecular microbial ecology tools in addressing fundamental and practical issues in environmental biotechnology and environmental engineering. An important area of his research and teaching is water and sanitation in developing countries.

Current and past research projects (funding of ~ $4.5 M in last 10 years) include: quantitative microbial risk assessment of graywater reuse (WRRI), molecular analysis and modeling of the competition between filaments and floc-formers in activated sludge (NSF), analysis of the ecophysiology of nitrifiers and denitrifiers in microbial floc (NSF), optimization of a swine waste treatment system for nitrogen removal (US Department of Agriculture), analysis of the fate of bioagents in landfills (EPA), microbial characterization of landfills (Waste Management, Inc.), molecular techniques for groundwater remedation sites (US DOE/DOD), investigation of foam control methods (Hazen and Sawyer), development of probes for environmentally versatile Bacillus strains (Novozymes Biochemicals, Inc.), improvement of sludge dewatering (NC WRRI), microbial ecology of grease interceptors (CSPA) and the system-wide optimization of wastewater treatment plants using genetic algorithms.  more…

edX: Introduction to Drinking Water Treatment – OCT 28

Tue, 21Oct2014 Comments off

Learn about urban water services, focusing on conventional technologies for drinking water treatment.

About this Course

This course focuses on conventional technologies for drinking water treatment. Unit processes, involved in the treatment chain, are discussed as well as the physical, chemical and biological processes involved. The emphasis is on the effect of treatment on water quality and the dimensions of the  unit processes in the treatment chain.  After the course one should be able to recognise the process units, describe their function, and make basic calculations for a preliminary design of a drinking water treatment plant.

The course consists of 4 modules:

  1. Introduction to drinking water treatment. In this module you learn to describe the important disciplines, schemes and evaluation criteria involved in the design phase.
  2. Water quality. In this module you learn to identify the drinking water quality parameters to be improved and explain what treatment train or scheme is needed.
  3. Groundwater treatment. In this module you learn to calculate the dimensions of the groundwater treatment processes and draw groundwater treatment schemes.
  4. Surface water treatment. In this module you learn to calculate the dimensions of the surface water treatment processes and draw surface water treatment schemes

more…

Categories: WatSan

Webinar – Disability: Making CLTS Fully Inclusive

Thu, 16Oct2014 Comments off

“press release”

On Thursday 30th October, 10-11.30am (GMT), the CLTS Knowledge Hub together with Hazel Jones (WEDC) and Jane Wilbur (WaterAid) will be hosting a webinar on the theme of the recently published Frontiers issue 3:Disability-Making CLTS fully inclusive.

About the webinar

CLTS aims at total sanitation. For that it has to be inclusive. There are ethical reasons for this, but the bottom line is that while any open defecation continues, all are affected. This webinar will focus on people with disabilities and their particular needs for access to sanitation. People affected tend not to be present at triggering, to lack voice in the community, to have their needs overlooked, and may even be hidden by their families. An initial presentation will outline the reality of the experiences of disabled people, the varied nature of their needs and share examples of how their needs can be met. This will be followed by an open discussion about practical steps that people engaged in CLTS can take to make the different phases and processes of CLTS more inclusive.

How to join

Please email us including your name, organisation and country to sign up for this webinar and we will send you instructions as well as a link for joining.

DATE: 16 OCTOBER 2014
INSTITUTIONS:
Categories: WatSan

E4C Webinar | WASH in Emergencies: Lessons Learned and Way Forward October 28

Thu, 16Oct2014 Comments off

press release

Presented by

Daniele Lantagne, Usen Family Career Development Assistant Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Tufts University

Moderated by

Sean Furey, Water & Sanitation Specialist, Skat Foundation

October 28, 2014 | 11:00 AM EDT

(convert to your time)

Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) are critical needs for populations affected by emergencies such as natural disasters, outbreaks, and violence.  In this webinar, we will learn about commonly implemented emergency response interventions to treat drinking water and find out about their successes, failures, and lessons learned. The webinar will discuss the need for implementation of proven interventions and development of new innovations to improve the quality of water and reduce the diarrheal disease burden in emergencies.
Join this E4C webinar on Tuesday, October 28 to:

  • Learn about WASH roles in an emergency response context
  • Understand water quality tests and treatment techniques
  • Participate in a discussion about successes, failures, and best practices in the field
  • Discover what’s new in the development of new WASH methods and technologies

Presented by     

Daniele Lantagne, Tufts University

 

Moderated by

 

Sean Furey, Skat Foundation

 

 

Visit our website for more details and follow the Twitter trail from@engineer4change with 

#E4CWebinars

Please do not hesitate to get in touch with any questions or to recommend a presenter for this series. We look forward to hearing from you!

Sincerely,

The E4C Webinars Team

webinars@engineeringforchange.org

Categories: WatSan

3rd Annual Virtual Menstrual Hygiene Mgmnt in WASH in Schools Conference

Thu, 02Oct2014 Comments off

 Sponsors: Columbia University and UNICEF
October 29th 2014
Background:
The 3rd annual virtual MHM conference will provide an opportunity to share lessons learned with the WASH in Schools (WinS) community around the world with a particular focus on MHM programming in WinS in various contexts. The conference will also enable the global WinS community to gather documentation for a basic package of MHM in WinS interventions. The conference will provide an opportunity to: (1)Share school based MHM program descriptions (2) Share findings on MHM program scale and impact and (3) Share recommendations about how new MHM programs can be developed by WinS practitioners

The 3rd annual virtual MHM in WinS conference will build on the content and recommendations of the prior two conferences, and continue the effort to fill in the gaps in the existing knowledge and advocacy around this important issue. Columbia University and UNICEF will be hosting the one-day conference on October 29th 2014, to bring together WASH, MHM experts, relevant global health and education experts, UNICEF country offices, academics and organizations from around the world currently implementing MHM-related activities.
Tentative Agenda:
The one-day meeting1 will convene in New York City, with a select number of in-person participants, with the vast majority of participants to be online by webex. There will be three sessions that allow for the sharing of a range of content while also attempting to accommodate various time zones. The sessions will include:
Session One: Program
What programs are currently being implemented to address the MHM barriers facing girls in a range of contexts? What are the key components of the programs? Who are the key stakeholders involved?
Session Two: Program Scale and Impact
What are the findings on the current scale and impact of existing MHM programs? What are the goals for future scale-up? What barriers and enablers to scale and impact are being encountered in various contexts?
Session Three: Recommendations for New Programs
What program approaches are recommended for organizations seeking to initiate an MHM program in WinS?
What are recommended first steps for initiating an MHM in WinS program?
All [submitters were asked ]to focus their discussion on the following topical areas that have been identified in recent years as fundamental aspects of MHM in WinS:
 Knowledge and education (sufficient knowledge, practical guidance and support)
 WASH facilities addressing MHM needs (privacy, disposal mechanisms, access to water and soap etc.)
 Availability and accessibility of absorbent materials
There will be time for discussion after all the presentations via webex.

1 A small in-person conference will be held on the 2nd day (October 30th) for which a small number of presenters will be invited to attend to further discuss the MHM in WinS global agenda. Please indicate your interest in attending for consideration although given limited space, the 2nd day will only be able to accommodate a small number of attendees.OR INTERESTED PRESENTERS

FOR INTERESTED ONLINE PARTICIPANTS
Please send expression of interest to mhm.webnyc@gmail.com by 22nd of October 2014.
Included in the email must be:
 Your name
 Country where you will be joining via the internet

source http://www.unicef.org/wash/schools/files/Extended_Deadline_2014.pdf

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