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President Obama signs into law H.R. 2901, the “Senator Paul Simon Water for the World Act of 2014,”

Sat, 27Dec2014 Comments off

sources: https://www.congress.gov/bill/113th-congress/house-bill/2901 and http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/12/19/statement-press-secretary-statement-press-secretary-hr-1068-hr-2754-hr-2AT THE SECOND SESSIONBegun and held at the City of Washington on Friday,
the third day of January, two thousand and fourteen

To strengthen implementation of the Senator Paul Simon Water for the Poor Act of 2005 by improving the capacity of the United States Government to implement, leverage, and monitor and evaluate programs to provide first-time or improved access to safe drinking water, sanitation, and hygiene to the world’s poorest on an equitable and sustainable basis, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This Act may be cited as the “Senator Paul Simon Water for the World Act of 2014”.

SEC. 2. SENSE OF CONGRESS.

It is the sense of Congress that—

(1) water and sanitation are critically important resources that impact many other aspects of human life; and

(2) the United States should be a global leader in helping provide sustainable access to clean water and sanitation for the world’s most vulnerable populations.

SEC. 3. CLARIFICATION OF ASSISTANCE TO PROVIDE SAFE WATER AND SANITATION TO INCLUDE HYGIENE.

Chapter 1 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended—

(1) by redesignating section 135 (22 U.S.C. 2152h), as added by section 5(a) of the Senator Paul Simon Water for the Poor Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–121; 22 U.S.C. 2152h note), as section 136; and

(2) in section 136, as redesignated—

(A) in the section heading, by striking “AND SANITATION” and inserting “, SANITATION, AND HYGIENE”; and

(B) in subsection (b), by striking “and sanitation” and inserting “, sanitation, and hygiene”.

SEC. 4. IMPROVING COORDINATION AND OVERSIGHT OF SAFE WATER, SANITATION AND HYGIENE PROJECTS AND ACTIVITIES.

Section 136 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as redesignated and amended by this Act, is further amended by adding at the end the following:

“(e) Coordination And Oversight.—

“(1) USAID GLOBAL WATER COORDINATOR.—

“(A) DESIGNATION.—The Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development (referred to in this paragraph as ‘USAID’) or the Administrator’s designee, who shall be a current USAID employee serving in a career or non-career position in the Senior Executive Service or at the level of a Deputy Assistant Administrator or higher, shall serve concurrently as the USAID Global Water Coordinator (referred to in this subsection as the ‘Coordinator’).

“(B) SPECIFIC DUTIES.—The Coordinator shall—

“(i) provide direction and guidance to, coordinate, and oversee the projects and programs of USAID authorized under this section;

“(ii) lead the implementation and revision, not less frequently than once every 5 years, of USAID’s portion of the Global Water Strategy required under subsection (j);

“(iii) seek—

“(I) to expand the capacity of USAID, subject to the availability of appropriations, including through the designation of a lead subject matter expert selected from among USAID staff in each high priority country designated pursuant to subsection (h);

“(II) to implement such programs and activities;

“(III) to take advantage of economies of scale; and

“(IV) to conduct more efficient and effective projects and programs;

“(iv) coordinate with the Department of State and USAID staff in each high priority country designated pursuant to subsection (h) to ensure that USAID activities and projects, USAID program planning and budgeting documents, and USAID country development strategies reflect and seek to implement—

“(I) the safe water, sanitation, and hygiene objectives established in the strategy required under subsection (j), including objectives relating to the management of water resources; and

“(II) international best practices relating to—

“(aa) increasing access to safe water and sanitation;

“(bb) conducting hygiene-related activities; and

“(cc) ensuring appropriate management of water resources; and

“(v) develop appropriate benchmarks, measurable goals, performance metrics, and monitoring and evaluation plans for USAID projects and programs authorized under this section.

“(2) DEPARTMENT OF STATE SPECIAL COORDINATOR FOR WATER RESOURCES.—

“(A) DESIGNATION.—The Secretary of State or the Secretary’s designee, who shall be a current employee of the Department of State serving in a career or non-career position in the Senior Executive Service or at the level of a Deputy Assistant Secretary or higher, shall serve concurrently as the Department of State Special Advisor for Water Resources (referred to in this paragraph as the ‘Special Advisor’).

“(B) SPECIFIC DUTIES.—The Special Advisor shall—

“(i) provide direction and guidance to, coordinate, and oversee the projects and programs of the Department of State authorized under this section;

“(ii) lead the implementation and revision, not less than every 5 years, of the Department of State’s portion of the Global Water Strategy required under subsection (j);

“(iii) prioritize and coordinate the Department of State’s international engagement on the allocation, distribution, and access to global fresh water resources and policies related to such matters;

“(iv) coordinate with United States Agency for International Development and Department of State staff in each high priority country designated pursuant to subsection (h) to ensure that United States diplomatic efforts related to safe water, sanitation, and hygiene, including efforts related to management of water resources and watersheds and the resolution of intra- and trans-boundary conflicts over water resources, are consistent with United States national interests; and

“(v) represent the views of the United States Government on the allocation, distribution, and access to global fresh water resources and policies related to such matters in key international fora, including key diplomatic, development-related, and scientific organizations.

“(3) ADDITIONAL NATURE OF DUTIES AND RESTRICTION ON ADDITIONAL OR SUPPLEMENTAL COMPENSATION.—The responsibilities and specific duties of the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development (or the Administrator’s designee) and the Secretary of State (or the Secretary’s designee) under paragraph (2) or (3), respectively, shall be in addition to any other responsibilities or specific duties assigned to such individuals. Such individuals shall receive no additional or supplemental compensation as a result of carrying out such responsibilities and specific duties under such paragraphs.”.

SEC. 5. PROMOTING THE MAXIMUM IMPACT AND LONG-TERM SUSTAINABILITY OF USAID SAFE WATER, SANITATION, AND HYGIENE-RELATED PROJECTS AND PROGRAMS.

Section 136 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as redesignated and amended by this Act, is further amended by adding at the end the following:

“(f) Priorities And Criteria For Maximum Impact And Long-Term Sustainability.—The Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development shall ensure that the Agency for International Development’s projects and programs authorized under this section are designed to achieve maximum impact and long-term sustainability by—

“(1) prioritizing countries on the basis of the following clearly defined criteria and indicators, to the extent sufficient empirical data are available—

“(A) the proportion of the population using an unimproved drinking water source;

“(B) the total population using an unimproved drinking water source;

“(C) the proportion of the population without piped water access;

“(D) the proportion of the population using shared or other unimproved sanitation facilities;

“(E) the total population using shared or other unimproved sanitation facilities;

“(F) the proportion of the population practicing open defecation;

“(G) the total number of children younger than 5 years of age who died from diarrheal disease;

“(H) the proportion of all deaths of children younger than 5 years of age resulting from diarrheal disease;

“(I) the national government’s capacity, capability, and commitment to work with the United States to improve access to safe water, sanitation, and hygiene, including—

“(i) the government’s capacity and commitment to developing the indigenous capacity to provide safe water and sanitation without the assistance of outside donors; and

“(ii) the degree to which such government—

“(I) identifies such efforts as a priority; and

“(II) allocates resources to such efforts;

“(J) the availability of opportunities to leverage existing public, private, or other donor investments in the water, sanitation, and hygiene sectors, including investments in the management of water resources; and

“(K) the likelihood of making significant improvements on a per capita basis on the health and educational opportunities available to women as a result of increased access to safe water, sanitation, and hygiene, including access to appropriate facilities at primary and secondary educational institutions seeking to ensure that communities benefitting from such projects and activities develop the indigenous capacity to provide safe water and sanitation without the assistance of outside donors;

“(2) prioritizing and measuring, including through rigorous monitoring and evaluating mechanisms, the extent to which such project or program—

“(A) furthers significant improvements in—

“(i) the criteria set forth in subparagraphs (A) through (H) of paragraph (1);

“(ii) the health and educational opportunities available to women as a result of increased access to safe water, sanitation, and hygiene, including access to appropriate facilities at primary and secondary educational institutions; and

“(iii) the indigenous capacity of the host nation or community to provide safe water and sanitation without the assistance of outside donors;

“(B) is designed, as part of the provision of safe water and sanitation to the local community—

“(i) to be financially independent over the long term, focusing on local ownership and sustainability;

“(ii) to be undertaken in conjunction with relevant public institutions or private enterprises;

“(iii) to identify and empower local individuals or institutions to be responsible for the effective management and maintenance of such project or program; and

“(iv) to provide safe water or expertise or capacity building to those identified parties or institutions for the purposes of developing a plan and clear responsibilities for the effective management and maintenance of such project or program;

“(C) leverages existing public, private, or other donor investments in the water, sanitation, and hygiene sectors, including investments in the management of water resources;

“(D) avoids duplication of efforts with other United States Government agencies or departments or those of other nations or nongovernmental organizations;

“(E) coordinates such efforts with the efforts of other United States Government agencies or departments or those of other nations or nongovernmental organizations directed at assisting refugees and other displaced individuals; and

“(F) involves consultation with appropriate stakeholders, including communities directly affected by the lack of access to clean water, sanitation or hygiene, and other appropriate nongovernmental organizations; and

“(3) seeking to further the strategy required under subsection (j) after 2018.

“(g) Use Of Current And Improved Empirical Data Collection And Review Of New Standardized Indicators.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—The Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development is authorized to use current and improved empirical data collection—

“(A) to meet the health-based prioritization criteria established pursuant to subsection (f)(1); and

“(B) to review new standardized indicators in evaluating progress towards meeting such criteria.

“(2) CONSULTATION AND NOTICE.—The Administrator shall—

“(A) regularly consult with the appropriate congressional committees; and

“(B) notify such committees not later than 30 days before using current or improved empirical data collection for the review of any new standardized indicators under paragraph (1) for the purposes of carrying out this section.

“(h) Designation Of High Priority Countries.—

“(1) INITIAL DESIGNATION.—Not later than October 1, 2015, the President shall—

“(A) designate, on the basis of the criteria set forth in subsection (f)(1) not fewer than 10 countries as high priority countries to be the primary recipients of United States Government assistance authorized under this section during fiscal year 2016; and

“(B) notify the appropriate congressional committees of such designations.

“(2) ANNUAL DESIGNATIONS.—

“(A) IN GENERAL.—Except as provided in subparagraph (B), the President shall annually make new designations pursuant to the criteria set forth in paragraph (1).

“(B) DESIGNATIONS AFTER FISCAL YEAR 2018.—Beginning with fiscal year 2019, designations under paragraph (1) shall be made—

“(i) based upon the criteria set forth in subsection (f)(1); and

“(ii) in furtherance of the strategy required under subsection (j).

“(i) Targeting Of Projects And Programs To Areas Of Greatest Need.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 15 days before the obligation of any funds for water, sanitation, or hygiene projects or programs pursuant to this section in countries that are not ranked in the top 50 countries based upon the WASH Needs Index, the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development shall notify the appropriate congressional committees of the planned obligation of such funds.

“(2) DEFINED TERM.—In this subsection and in subsection (j), the term ‘WASH Needs Index’ means the needs index for water, sanitation, or hygiene projects or programs authorized under this section that has been developed using the criteria and indicators described in subparagraphs (A) through (H) of subsection (f)(1).”.

SEC. 6. UNITED STATES STRATEGY TO INCREASE APPROPRIATE LONG-TERM SUSTAINABILITY AND ACCESS TO SAFE WATER, SANITATION, AND HYGIENE.

(a) In General.—Section 136 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as redesignated and amended by this Act, is further amended by adding at the end the following:

“(j) Global Water Strategy.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than October 1, 2017, October 1, 2022, and October 1, 2027, the President, acting through the Secretary of State, the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development, and the heads of other Federal departments and agencies, as appropriate, shall submit a single government-wide Global Water Strategy to the appropriate congressional committees that provides a detailed description of how the United States intends—

“(A) to increase access to safe water, sanitation, and hygiene in high priority countries designated pursuant to subsection (h), including a summary of the WASH Needs Index and the specific weighting of empirical data and other definitions used to develop and rank countries on the WASH Needs Index;

“(B) to improve the management of water resources and watersheds in such countries; and

“(C) to work to prevent and resolve, to the greatest degree possible, both intra- and trans-boundary conflicts over water resources in such countries.

“(2) AGENCY-SPECIFIC PLANS.—The Global Water Strategy shall include an agency-specific plan—

“(A) from the United States Agency for International Development that describes specifically how the Agency for International Development will—

“(i) carry out the duties and responsibilities assigned to the Global Water Coordinator under subsection (e)(1);

“(ii) ensure that the Agency for International Development’s projects and programs authorized under this section are designed to achieve maximum impact and long-term sustainability, including by implementing the requirements described in subsection (f); and

“(iii) increase access to safe water, sanitation, and hygiene in high priority countries designated pursuant to subsection (h);

“(B) from the Department of State that describes specifically how the Department of State will—

“(i) carry out the duties and responsibilities assigned to the Special Coordinator for Water Resources under subsection (e)(2); and

“(ii) ensure that the Department’s activities authorized under this section are designed—

“(I) to improve management of water resources and watersheds in countries designated pursuant to subsection (h); and

“(II) to prevent and resolve, to the greatest degree possible, both intra- and trans-boundary conflicts over water resources in such countries; and

“(C) from other Federal departments and agencies, as appropriate, that describes the contributions of the departments and agencies to implementing the Global Water Strategy.

“(3) INDIVIDUALIZED PLANS FOR HIGH PRIORITY COUNTRIES.—For each high priority country designated pursuant to subsection (h), the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development shall—

“(A) develop a costed, evidence-based, and results-oriented plan that—

“(i) seeks to achieve the purposes of this section; and

“(ii) meets the requirements under subsection (f); and

“(B) include such plan in an appendix to the Global Water Strategy required under paragraph (1).

“(4) FIRST TIME ACCESS REPORTING REQUIREMENT.—The Global Water Strategy shall specifically describe the target percentage of funding for each fiscal year covered by such strategy to be directed toward projects aimed at providing first-time access to safe water and sanitation.

“(5) PERFORMANCE INDICATORS.—The Global Water Strategy shall include specific and measurable goals, benchmarks, performance metrics, timetables, and monitoring and evaluation plans required to be developed by the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development pursuant to subsection (e)(1)(B)(v).

“(6) CONSULTATION AND BEST PRACTICES.—The Global Water Strategy shall—

“(A) be developed in consultation with the heads of other appropriate Federal departments and agencies; and

“(B) incorporate best practices from the international development community.

“(k) Definitions.—In this section—

“(1) the term ‘appropriate congressional committees’ means—

“(A) the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate;

“(B) the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate;

“(C) the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives; and

“(D) the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives; and

“(2) the term ‘long-term sustainability’ refers to the ability of a service delivery system, community, partner, or beneficiary to maintain, over time, any water, sanitation, or hygiene project that receives funding pursuant to the amendments made by the Senator Paul Simon Water for the World Act of 2014”..”.

(b) Department Of State Agency-Specific Plan.—Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit an agency-specific plan to the appropriate congressional committees (as defined in section 136(k) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as added by subsection (a)) that meets the requirements of section 136(j)(2)(B) of such Act, as added by subsection (a).

(c) Conforming Amendment.—Section 6 of the Senator Paul Simon Water for the Poor Act of 2005 (Public Law 109–121; 22 U.S.C. 2152h note) is repealed.

Attest:

Speaker of the House of Representatives.  

Attest:

Categories: hygiene, WASH, water, WatSan

Catarina de Albuquerque 2013 Health and Human Rights Lecture @UNCH2OInstitute

Tue, 14Jan2014 Comments off

 

Published on Nov 25, 2013

Catarina de Albuquerque, a leading human rights expert and the first United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to safe drinking water and sanitation, delivers the 2013 UNC Health and Human Rights Lecture, “Implementing Human Rights to Eliminate Inequalities in Water and Sanitation.”
DOWNLOAD THE PODCAST: https://itunes.apple.com/us/itunes-u/…

The event is co-sponsored by the Center for Bioethics, the Department of Public Policy, the Water Institute at UNC and the Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases at UNC. It is part of the University’s campus-wide theme, ‘Water in Our World.’

 

Where do yo shit by @WaterForPeple

Tue, 14Jan2014 Comments off

Great video! by Water For People, sure there are a lot of little details not mentioned, but you can not do better for a 5 minute video.

New Book: Sustainable Water and Sanitation Services – Life-Cycle Cost Approach…

Sun, 12Jan2014 Comments off

There is a new book out that looks worthy of getting your library to order:Sustainable Water and Sanitation Services The Life-Cycle Cost Approach to Planning and Management

Sustainable Water and Sanitation Services
The Life-Cycle Cost Approach to Planning and Management

Hardback: $145.00  978-0-415-82818-5  December 24th 2013

Taylor & Francis Group

“Based on the work of the WASHCost project run by the IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre (IRC), this book provides an evaluation of the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) sectors in the context of developing countries and is the first systematic study of applying the life-cycle cost approach to assessing allocations. It presents unit cost estimates of the WASH sector across geographic locations and technologies, including rural and peri-urban areas, and these are compared with service levels. It analyses detailed data from more than 5000 households across nine agro-climatic zones in Andhra Pradesh State in India. Key issues assessed include poverty analysis of service levels, cost drivers and factors at the village and household level, and governance aspects such as transparency, accountability and value for money in relation to unit costs and service levels.

This is the most comprehensive study of the WASH sector in India and elsewhere that utilises the life-cycle cost approach, along with GIS, econometric modelling and qualitative research methods. Not only does it contribute to research and methodology in this area, but the analysis also provides valuable insights for planners, policy makers and bi-lateral donors. The authors show how the methodology can also be applied in other developing country contexts.”

Contents

  1. Introduction
    • V. Ratna Reddy, Catarina Fonseca and Charles Batchelor
  2. WASH Sector in India: The Policy Context
    • V. Kurian Baby and V. Ratna Reddy
  3. Life-Cycle Cost Approach: An Analytical Framework for WASH Sector
    • V. Ratna Reddy, Catarina Fonseca and Charles Batchelor
  4. Unit Costs and Service Levels: Region and Technology-wise
    • V. Ratna Reddy, M. Venkataswamy and M. Snehalatha
  5. Explaining Inter-Village Variations in Drinking Water Provision: Factors Influencing Costs and Service Levels in Rural Andhra Pradesh
    • V. Ratna Reddy
  6. Rural Sanitation and Hygiene: Economic and Institutional Aspects of Sustainable Services
    • V. Ratna Reddy
  7. Nirmal Gram Puraskar and Sanitation Service Levels: Curse of Slippage
    • M. Snehalatha, V. Anitha Raj, P. Bhushan and M. Venkataswamy
  8. Cost of Provision and Managing WASH Services in Peri-Urban Areas
    • G. Alivelu, V. Ratna Reddy, P. Bhushan and V. Anitha Raj
  9. Skewed and Inequitable Access to Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Services
    • M.Snehalatha and James Batchelor
  10. How can Water Security be Improved in Water Scarce Areas of Rural India?
    • Charles Batchelor, James Batchelor and M. Snehalatha
  11. Assessing Progress towards Sustainable Service Delivery in India: Lessons for Rural Water Supply
    • A.J. James
  12. Transparency, Accountability and Participation (TAP): Understanding Governance in Rural WASH Sector
    • M.V. Rama Chandrudu. Safa Fanaian and R. Subramanyam Naidu
  13. Decentralized Governance and Sustainable Service Delivery: A Case of Nenmeni Rural Water Supply Scheme, Kerala, India
    • P.K. Kurian, V. Kurian Baby and Terry Thomas
  14. Provision of Sustainable WASH Services: Policy Options and Imperatives
    • V. Ratna Reddy, Catarina Fonseca and Charles Batchelor

Free Course: Designing and Implementing Successful Water Supply and Sanitation Utility Reform

Sun, 12Jan2014 Comments off

Free online course from the World Bank:

In emerging markets, many water supply and sanitation utilities are locked in a vicious spiral of weak performance, insufficient funding, deterioration of assets, institutional discrepancies and political interference. This is largely the consequence of poor governance, ineffective and misdirected policies, and the monopolistic nature of the sector.To help support reform in the water and sanitation sectors, the World Bank Institute (WBI) has developed a core learning program in “Designing and Implementing Successful Utility Reform.” The objective of the program is to provide government officials, senior managers of utilities and technical staff with the knowledge, skills and tools for initiating and sustaining reform. This e-learning program, which consists of lessons, case studies and exercises, supports stakeholders to reform their water utility.Target Audience:
Mid-level managers and technical specialists who are responsible for change in their organization. more…
 
 

About the e-Institute:

 
This unique global portal is designed to support self-motivated learners who want to get up to speed on the latest development trends, enhance their skills, and share knowledge through on-line learning communities.
Connect.  Learn.  Innovate.  Inspire.

 

One of the greatest challenges facing today’s development practitioners is the dearth of affordable, innovative, and practitioner-focused training on the “how to” of policy reform and proven good practices customized to local needs. Tight training budgets and time constraints preclude travel to a central location for high quality, hands-on learning. The e-Institute was launched as a virtual learning classroom to provide convenient, easy, and reliable access to cutting edge knowledge and communities of practice. More than forty-five e-Learning courses address complex real-world problems in priority areas such as governance, health, cities, climate change, and public private partnerships. Learners also have access to free monthly podcasts and webinars, video success stories, multimedia toolkits, and other resources. source…

Paper: Domestic Water Source, Sanitation and High Risk of Bacteriological Diseases in the Urban Slum: Case of Cholera in Makoko, Lagos, Nigeria

Sun, 12Jan2014 Comments off

Ayeni A. O.

Department of Geography, University of Lagos, Akoka – Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria

Domestic Water Source, Sanitation and High Risk of Bacteriological Diseases in the Urban Slum: Case of Cholera in Makoko, Lagos, Nigeria

Abstract

This study assesses the cholera incidence in urban slum in Lagos State, Nigeria with the emphasis on high risk of unimproved sources of water for domestic use and unsanitary environment. The study uses sets of one hundred and twenty structured guided questionnaires were randomly administered to obtain information on residents’ opinions and experiences on the risk and incidence of cholera in the area. Ten water samples were spatially collected from storage containers of the residents for microbial assessment Results of social survey instrument showed there was cholera incidence and the area is still at high risk as revealed from the result of coliform bacilli with high most probable number (MPN) count found in 6 of the 16 sampled water as well as the faecal coliform found virtually in all sampled water. The study concluded that increasing population of urban centres has been a major contributor to the unsanitary environmental, continuous use of unimproved sources of water as well as environmental health problems such as slum cholera risk and incidence. Therefore, for sustainable friendly and free diseases’ environment provision of habitable and conducive environment for the slum residents should be the priority of government.
more…

Seeking water and sanitation projects for 2014 Environmental Challenge – Reed Elsevier

Tue, 10Dec2013 Comments off

 $90,000 in prize money to be awarded to winning proposals to help the developing world

By Emmy Stevens | Posted on 9 December 2013

The Reed Elsevier Environmental Challenge awards prize money to three projects that best demonstrate how they can provide sustainable access to safe water or sanitation where it is presently at risk. Projects must have clear practical applicability, address identified needs and advance related issues such as health, education or human rights.

This is the fourth year that Reed Elsevier (Elsevier’s parent company) has held this challenge.

There is a $50,000 prize for the first place entry and a $25,000 prize for the second place entry. Applicants are offered access to Elsevier’s scientific online publications and databases, and for the first time, all applicants will be offered access to LexisNexis Risk Solution’s open source high performance computing (HPCC) resource, to allow them to process large amounts of research data, supported by online training. Winning projects will be highlighted in Elsevier journal Water Research.

For the second year, a $15,000 WASH Alliance prize will be given for the third prize project. The Dutch WASH Alliance is a consortium of six Dutch NGOs promoting access to and hygienic use of sustainable water and sanitation. The WASH Alliance will provide reviewers, judges and funding for the competition, and up to $2,500 towards relevant training and professional development for each winner.

The Environmental Challenge also contributes to the Water for Life Decade (2005-15) established by the UN General Assembly in support of the Millennium Development Goal to reduce by half the proportion of the population without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation.

In addition, it ties into Elsevier’s aim to facilitate the exchange and dissemination of scientific information – in this case, information on improving access to a sustainable water supply and sanitation.

The 2014 challenge was launched at Pollutec Horizons in Paris, organized by Reed Exhibitions.

How to enter

The 2014 Reed Elsevier Environmental Challenge is open to individuals or organizations operating in the nonprofit and for-profit sectors. Projects must advance sustainable access to safe water or improved sanitation where it is presently at risk and include the following criteria:

  • Be replicable, scalable and sustainable and set a benchmark for innovation
  • Have practical applicability
  • Address non-discrimination/equity of access
  • Involve and impact a range of stakeholders
  • Have local/community-level engagement

Applications will be accepted through April 1, 2014. For more information, visit the Reed Elsevier Environmental Challenge website and apply here.

 

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