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Call for papers: Global Public Health Conference: Kattankulathur India

Mon, 07Oct2013 Comments off

Press Release

Global Public Health Conference GPHCON at SRM University, Kattankulathur

– Call for papers

Last Date: November 30, 2013

  GPHCON 2014


Pre Conference Workshop -Thursday 20th February 2014

Conference – 21-23 February, 2014

Organized by : School of Public Health ,SRM University
Supported by : Distinguished Members of Public Health Associations of India

Secretariat
School of Public Health, III Floor, Medical College Building
SRM University ,SRM Nagar, Kattankulathur
Tamil Nadu-603203, India, Tel- +91-44-27455771
Email- gphcon2014@srmuniv.ac.in

For details: http://gphcon2014.wix.com/gphcon#!organising-committe-/c1d94

Greetings from the Organizing Committee -GPHCON2014 It is our privilege to intimate you that School of Public Health SRM University will be organizing Global Public Health Conference in February 21-23, 2014 and the pre-conference workshop is on February 20, 2014. The theme of the conference is “Multi- disciplinary Approaches in Public Health: innovations, practices and Future Strategies” and about 25 sub themes focuses on multi-disciplinary approaches.

The aim of this conference is to bring the public health professionals from various disciplines to a single platform and share their technical expertise for the benefit of the people and the world. If you are working actively with public health systems or practicing public health at any level we invite you to share your rich experience in the conference. Your participation would add great value to the conference and you will certainly enjoy being among the renowned intellectual expertise.

The venue of the conference is SRM University, Near Chennai. SRM University is the first private University in India and has many glorious achievements to its credit. SRM launched the Nano satellite named, SRMSAT in the year 2012: it has been designed by students and faculties of SRM University. The crowning glory for the SRM University is in being the first private University in India to host the 98th Indian Science Congress that was hosted with the theme “Quality Education and Excellence in Scientific Research in Indian Universities” was formally inaugurated by the Prime Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh in the year 2010 which was attended by more than 10,400 delegates from India and abroad including six Nobel Laureates has participated.

Keeping the legacy of organizing the large national and international conferences we School of Public Health, SRM University invite your august participation in the conference.

ABOUT THE UNIVERSITY SRM

University is one of the top ranking universities in India with over 20,000 students and 1,500 faculties, offering a wide range of undergraduate, postgraduate, and doctoral programs in Engineering, Management, Medicine and Health Sciences, and Science and Humanities. SRM University with multiple institutions having been established 28 years ago is one of the largest private Universities in India. Over two and half decades, SRM University has set standards in experimental education and knowledge creation across various fields. Over 600 acres replete with a variety of facilities, State-of-the-art labs, libraries, Wi-Fi, Knowledge centre, 4500 capacity AC auditorium, 100 online smart classrooms and hostels with premium facilities.

SRM University is the first private university in India to launch the Nano satellite named, SRMSAT: it has been designed by students and faculties of SRM University. The design is made robust enough support different payloads and act as Nano Bus for further mission. By this process SRM University would be able to provide qualified and trained scientist and technological manpower in satellite technology. Added to the crowning glory for the SRM University is that the 98th Indian Science Congress was hosted with the theme “Quality Education and Excellence in Scientific Research in Indian Universities”, was formally inaugurated by the Prime Minister in which more than 10,400 delegates from India and abroad including six Nobel Laureates has participated.

ABOUT THE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Emerging as a School of Excellence in the 6 years of genesis, our staff brings experience in multiple disciplines and have hands on experience in local, national, and international health settings. Our capabilities in research, knowledge and practice have been tested time to time and proved successful..School of Public Health intercepts into many inter related disciplines, which have key elements in common that bring us together. School of Public Health, because of its unique standing is a powerful tool in bring about balance. The School works on “hubs and spokes” model linking many departments that include Medicine, Engineering, Nursing and Management in its manifold to function effectively. Postgraduate program in the School of Public Health is designed for graduates, who aspire to be leaders and professionals in public health, who aspire to reach high-level roles nationally and internationally. Our students come from all parts of India and a few International students from the Far East. They have relevant academic and work experience. Majority of our students have a prior health related degree, and we have students from various disciplines like Arts, Humanities and Engineering. We have Doctors and Public Health Officers nominated from various states and Union Territories.

This program prepares health professionals from a varied range of backgrounds, with knowledge and skills from a variety of disciplines, to define, critically assess and resolve public health and nutrition problems. Various fields of study allow students to focus on Indian public health issues and international public health, including nutrition and tropical health.

Theme   “Multi-disciplinary Approaches in Public Health: Innovations, Practices and Future Strategies”

Sub- Theme

  • Public Health Policy,
  • Public Health Education,
  • Pharmacovigilance in Public Health,
  • AYUSH and Public Health, Community Health,
  • Public Health Nursing, Public Health Engineering,
  • Health Analytics, Public Health Ethics and Legalities,
  • Veterinary Public Health, Occupational and Industrial Health,
  • Public Health Promotion and Behaviour Change Communication,
  • Migration Refugees and Urban Public Health, Public Health Nutrition,
  • Hospitality Industry and Public Health, Economics of Public Health,
  • Reproductive and Child Health Management in Public Health,
  • Water Sanitation and Hygiene, Equity Issues in Public Health,
  • Environmental Public Health, Public Health Research ,
  • CSR in Public Health, Role of NGOs in Public Health,
  • Medical Public Health, Public Health Dentistry,
  • Information Technology and Public Health
  • Disaster and Public Health

Abstract Submission

Authors who wish to submit abstract should follow the format for abstract submission that can be downloaded from the website. Abstracts should be written in English. Abstracts that are submitted must NOT have been previously presented in any other conference or published anywhere in any form.

Abstract should not exceed 300 words. It must be prepared in MS Word format. A 12 point font, Times New Roman, 1.5 line spacing should be used. Abstracts should be structured one with following sub-headings indicating in bold – Background; Objectives; Methods; Results; Conclusion. Always define abbreviations and acronyms including standard measures. Place special or unusual abbreviations in parentheses after the full word the first time it appears. Each abstract must be complete, i.e. it must include all information necessary for its comprehension and not refer to another text.

We encourage applying though online submission; however for the convenience the abstract can be emailed to gphcon.2014@srmuniv.edu.in. The submitted abstract will be reviewed by the expert committee and the authors will be notified about the acceptance by Email. If accepted for presentation the selected authors are requested to submit the full paper.

o Deadline for abstract submission – November 30, 2013.
o Last date for submission of full paper – December 31, 2013
o After you complete your submission, you will receive an e-mail that confirms your submission was successfully received.
o Keep a copy of your abstract submission for your records.

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Toilet Revolution: Shyama V. Ramani at TEDxMaastricht

Mon, 16Sep2013 Comments off

This is one of the best Sanitation/ Global Health stories we have seen lately. Delivered in a  very pleasurable consumable format, by a great speaker who make the topic reachable to a board spectrum of professionals and people. It’s antidotal in nature, while being universal in the realities of solving a village’s sanitation issues. Shyama has an honesty that needs to be incorporated into the newly developing transparency practices oft the world’s NGOs . This talk needs to be shown to the NGO’s and their altruistic “minions” before they venture out to help their global brothers and sisters.

The story starts out after audience imagining life with out toilets with Shyama explaining how she as pure novice, walks into a coastal village after a tsunami, and realizes she must bring the villages toilets back.

She learns along the way  “…2.4 billion people don’t even have access to a toilet that functions, 1 billion don’t have access to any toilet the just have to defecate anywhere they can …” Thus the “….lack of waste management and toilets is making a killer that we are not talking about enough … diarrhea…. the number one killer in most developing countries…”

She Googles and contacts “experts” to educates herself with the facts to get the job done  or so she thinks.

Upon the last new toilet being being initiated with a squat of a villager behind closed doors, Shyama, unlike many of the NGO’s, does not walked away.  The core of her captivating story is what happens afterward … The door is opened, the veil of naivety is exposed and lifted. Where/when most project fall into failure, she and her partner begins the long diagnostic/prognostic/improvement cycle.

Shyama  reminds us it is a an effort that is ongoing with more to learn and invites us to come back… It will be a crime if we do not see the next installment of this story as it continues to unfold.

Essential and very practical points abound within her story. One that are be showing up in other stories from around the world- and  hopepfully becoming a  din that must be addressed. With some paraphrasing, here are a few I see tucked in her tail:
1 NGO’s can’t do it alone and succeed; the villagers are needed – with a vastly redefined roll for NGOs.
2 Technical experts/ engineers may not be the social experts – both are needed.
3 Toilets at the onset are not alway seen as valuable/desirable assets. Education is needed before during and after
4 Women and men of the villages do not have the same perspective on sanitation. The project must address both separately as well as together .
5 Villages without ongoing support services will quickly have “…fossils of abandoned stinking toilets allover…”
6 Schools as an institution do not just naturally promote and desire ecosan toilets. They must also be nurtured. (details not addressed in this piece – but would be important to learn more about)
7 Building heathy social stimulus/pressure/ pride must be part of the scope
8 People who want the toilet must be educated on use and care
9 The villagers must be part of the economic model – the social model. Such pieces as manufacturing / construction/ distribution/ sales/ support / education/ promotion/ etc
10 Microfinance is a viable solution – (a work in progress in the story)
11 Toilets can provide a financially valuable natural resource – fertilizer
12 This all makes it a slower road, but it is a viable road, unlike the fast road the many NGO’s are building.
13 100% may be the target but  80% is a not a bad number to start with- and even that require lots of work.

Shyama  reminds us it’s a an effort that is ongoing and invites us to come back ,so to speak.  It will be a crime if we do not see the next installment of this story as it continues to unfold.

 

The Wello Water Wheel Story : Cynthia Koenig at TEDxGateway

Mon, 04Mar2013 1 comment

Cynthia talks about the often underestimated problem of water weight and how this problem is preventing millions of women from educating and empowering themselves. She points about the fact that ‘water is heavy’ using real life examples in Rajasnthan, India. Not only is water heavy but also time consuming and limiting women of important opportunities. She talks about her invention “wello” where she & her team have reinvented the wheel. She brings the water wheel on stage, explaining the design and features in this product, allowing the audience to see this easy to use, yet immensely life changing water wheel.

more on YouTube site…

Wello Water Site.

Cynthia’s Profile   on UnreasonableNetwork -(really, a good site)

Other drums solutions 

Global Health Volunteer Abroad Experience: Global Impact Corps

Fri, 17Aug2012 Comments off

Overview:

Unite For Sight’s Global Impact Corps is a high-impact “immersive” global health experience for students and for professionals. Unite For Sight is renowned as the highest quality global health immersion and volunteer abroad program worldwide. Unite For Sight prides itself on offering the best global health experience for our Global Impact Fellows, coupled with the highest quality of healthcare delivery programs with our partners.

Locations of Year-Round Programs:

Ghana, Honduras, India
(volunteer for 7 days, 15 days, 20 days, 4 weeks, 6 weeks, 8 weeks, 10 weeks, or more)

What do Global Impact Fellows do?:

Global Impact Fellows support and learn from the partner clinics’ talented medical professionals. Through hands-on, structured training, Global Impact Fellows gain a comprehensive understanding about best practices in global health and social entrepreneurship, and they receive a Certificate in Global Health & Program Delivery.  

Global Impact Fellows come from very diverse backgrounds, including those interested in public health, medicine, international development, social entrepreneurship, and the social sciences.  Global Impact Fellows work with local doctors to eliminate patient barriers to care for patients living in extreme poverty.  They assist with patient education, visual acuity screening, patient intake, distributing the glasses and medication prescribed by the local eye doctors, and other important support tasks.  They also have the opportunity to observe the surgeries provided by the local doctors. Additionally, Global Impact Fellows may participate in the Global Impact Lab, an optional program for those interested in pursuing global health research. For example, current Global Impact Fellows are pursuing research studies about medication management, the use of visual resources for patient education, traditional medicine practices, and patient barriers to care.

What do Global Impact Fellows say?

“I gained a vast basin of knowledge not only about eye health, but also on the healthcare infrastructure, patient interactions, and management systems of the developing world. Reading about health issues in the news or in class became stark reality during my summer in Dhenkanal, and I now aim to reinvigorate my efforts to study and contribute to the field of international health. Over the course of my career, I hope that I can one day return to India as a doctor and remedy the health inequalities that remain ever-present on a global scale,” Pallavi Basu, Global Impact Fellow.  See more volunteer accounts at http://www.uniteforsight.org/volunteer-abroad/volunteer-accounts

 

What Next:

See the complete details and the online application at http://www.uniteforsight.org/volunteer-abroad

 

source: content is  from their  site, email from Unite for Sight,  and blog: “Going to Ghana – One Global Impact Fellow’s Experience with Unite for Sight”

 

Webinar:Why does diarrhea matter? Lessons from Countries

Wed, 15Aug2012 Comments off

August 7, 2012 — MCHIP

Please join CORE Group and MCHIP for the second in a series of webinars on diarrheal disease.

WHEN: August 21st from 9 – 11 am EST

HOW: Join by registering at CORE Group’s website [2]

WHO: Moderated by Dr. Dyness Kasungami, MCHIP Team Leader for Child Health

DESCRIPTION:
The second leading cause of preventable child deaths, diarrheal disease claims the lives of 1.3 million children under-five annually, mostly in Africa and South Asia. Gains from the introduction of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) and improved water, sanitation and hygiene are have not been sustained in many countries, with global coverage of ORT use being as low as 34%.

The first webinar in February focused on advocating for coordinated approaches to implement a package of effective interventions, and mobilizing resources and multi-disciplinary partners. In this second webinar, Dr. Dyness Kasungami will moderate a panel with three speakers who will present country success experiences  from Benin, Ghana and India in addressing low coverage of effective interventions in diarrheal disease.

The panelists will also share lessons learned surrounding promising practices to increase coverage of zinc, changed dynamics around ORS/zinc use, and the links between treatment and key Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) practices for prevention. The panel presentation will be followed by an opportunity for a Q&A with participants.

PANELISTS:
Katharine McHugh is the WASH Technical Advisor at PSI.
Topics: Diarrhea treatment program in Benin; strengthening linkages between ORT/zinc and WASH

Kate Schroder is the Director of Essential Medicines Initiative of Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI).
Topic: Demand generation for ORS and zinc in India

Vicki MacDonald is the Child Health Advisor of Abt Associates.
Topic: A public/private partnership in Ghana to address the introduction of zinc

© MCHIP-Maternal and Child Health Integrated Program
1776 Massachusetts Avenue, NW Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036 | TEL: 202-835-3100 | FAX: 202-835-3150
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TEDx HOW NEXTDROP IS USING CELL PHONES, CROWDSOURCING TO GET WATER TO THE THIRSTY.

Sun, 19Feb2012 2 comments

 

notes from the site:
In many cities in developing countries, residents have piped water supplies. But there’s a catch: the water is only available through the pipes for a few hours at a time, and people have no way of knowing when that will be. As a result, residents (mostly women and the poor) spend their days just waiting for the water to arrive. Anu Shiridharan from NextDrop, one of the speakers at TEDxGateway, has a solution.

Anu Sridharan graduated from the University of California, Berkeley in December 2010 with a Master’s degree in Civil Systems engineering, and received her Bachelor’s degree from UC Berkeley in 2009 as well.

During her time there, Anu researched the optimization of pipe networked systems in emerging economies as well as business models for the dissemination of water purification technologies for arsenic removal in emerging economies.

Anu also served as the Education and Health director for a water/sanitation project in the slums of Mumbai, India called “Haath Mein Sehat” where she piloted a successful volunteer recruitment and community training model.

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

http://www.tedxgateway.com
http://www.ted.com

new reprort Financing On-Site Sanitation for the Poor

Mon, 25Jan2010 1 comment

Financing On-Site  Sanitation for the Poor A Six Country Comparative Review and Analysis

is Available From WSP Water and Sanitation Program is 174 page pdf doc dated January 2010

On-Site Sanitation for the Poor

“The study was written by Sophie Trémolet (independent consultant) under the leadership and guidance of Eddy Perez (Water and Sanitation Program – WSP) and Pete Kolsky (World Bank)…”

It starts with a quick overview of current conditions quoting from a variety of existing publications:

“…sanitation costs the economies of four Southeast Asian countries the equivalent of approximately 2 percent of their GDP…”

“In the six countries described in this study, the capital cost of household sanitation varied between US$17 and US$568, costs which often exceeded half the annual household income of the poor in the respective project areas.”

They go on to say ” The challenges of fnance – the practical decisions about who pays how much for what, when, and how – thus lie at the heart of the world’s eforts to promote health, dignity, and a cleaner environment through sanitation. Yet despite the importance of the topic, past eforts to gather meaningful data on sanitation fnance have largely failed.”   Thus, the study.

The 6 cases studies are:

  • Bangladesh DISHARI – based on Community Led Total Sanitation CTLS
    • rural areas
    • Basic latrines
    • 1,630,733 people
    • 2004 to 2008
  • Ecuador  – PRAGUAS
    • rural areas
    • Sanitation units (toilet, septic tank, sink, shower)
    • 143,320 people
    • 2001 to 2006
  • Maharashtra (India) – Total Sanitation Campaign   (TSC) using CLTS approaches
    • rural areas
    • Improved latrines
    • 21,200,417 people
    • July 2000 to November 2008
  • Mozambique – Improved Latrines Program (PLM) –
    • urban areas
    • Improved latrines
    • 1,887,891 people
    • 1980 to 2007
  • Sénégal- PAQPUD –
    • urban areas
    • improved latrines to septic tanks
    • 410,507 people
    • 2002 to 2005
  • Vietnam – Sanitation Revolving Fund SRF
    • urban areas
    • Mostly bathrooms and septic tanks
    • 193,670 people
    • 2001 to 2008

According to the study they address:

•  How much does provision of access to on-site sanitation cost, that is, once all costs (hardware and soft-
ware) are taken into account?
•  Do the type and scale of sanitation subsidy afect provision and uptake? How?
•  How can the public sector most efectively support household investment in on-site sanitation?
•  Should it be via investment in demand stimulation, subsidies to households or suppliers, by support to
credit schemes, or by other means?
•  Should hardware subsidies be provided or should public spending be focused on promoting demand or supporting the supply side of the market? Where hardware subsidies are adopted, what is the best way
to ensure that they reach their intended recipients and are sustainable and scalable?

•  What innovative mechanisms (such as credit or revolving funds) can be used to promote household sanitation fnancing?

Evaluation criteria:

  1. “Impact on sustainable access  to services: Did the project contribute to increasing access to sanitation? “
  2. “Costs: Are the costs of the resulting sanitation facilities reasonable and affordable to the beneficiaries?”
  3. “Effectiveness in the use of public funds: Were public funds used in a way that maximized impact? “
  4. “Poverty targeting: Did the program seek to target the poor and was the program effective at doing so?”
  5. “Financial sustainability:    Could the financial approach be sustained over time without external support?”
  6. “Scalability:    Could the fnancial approach be scaled up to cover those who are not yet covered in the
    country at a reasonable cost?”

The Key finding explored in detail in the study are

  1. “Taken together, the case studies make a compelling case that partial public funding can trigger signifcantly increased access to household sanitation. “
  2. “The studies show that the most relevant question is not “Are subsidies good or bad?” but rather “How best can we invest public funds?” “
  3. “The diferent fnancing strategies adopted had a profound infuence, for better or for worse, on equity, scale, sustainability, levels of service, and costs.”
  4. “Households are key investors in on-site sanitation, and careful project design and implementation can maximize their involvement, satisfaction, and fnancial investment…”
  5. “Hardware subsidies of some form played a critical role in all six case studies. “
  6. “Subsidy targeting methods need to be tailored to country circumstances.  “
  7. “The provision of hardware subsidies on an output basis rather than an input basis can be efective at stimulating demand and leveraging private investment.”
  8. All of the case studies included a signifcant publicly funded software component (promotion and community mobilization).

Related:

Gates Foundation steps up water efforts with grant to improve sanitation

The challenges of financing sanitation

Ethiopia – Effective financing of local governments to provide water and sanitation services

Innovations in Financing Urban Water & Sanitation

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