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Toilet Revolution: Shyama V. Ramani at TEDxMaastricht

Mon, 16Sep2013 Comments off

This is one of the best Sanitation/ Global Health stories we have seen lately. Delivered in a  very pleasurable consumable format, by a great speaker who make the topic reachable to a board spectrum of professionals and people. It’s antidotal in nature, while being universal in the realities of solving a village’s sanitation issues. Shyama has an honesty that needs to be incorporated into the newly developing transparency practices oft the world’s NGOs . This talk needs to be shown to the NGO’s and their altruistic “minions” before they venture out to help their global brothers and sisters.

The story starts out after audience imagining life with out toilets with Shyama explaining how she as pure novice, walks into a coastal village after a tsunami, and realizes she must bring the villages toilets back.

She learns along the way  “…2.4 billion people don’t even have access to a toilet that functions, 1 billion don’t have access to any toilet the just have to defecate anywhere they can …” Thus the “….lack of waste management and toilets is making a killer that we are not talking about enough … diarrhea…. the number one killer in most developing countries…”

She Googles and contacts “experts” to educates herself with the facts to get the job done  or so she thinks.

Upon the last new toilet being being initiated with a squat of a villager behind closed doors, Shyama, unlike many of the NGO’s, does not walked away.  The core of her captivating story is what happens afterward … The door is opened, the veil of naivety is exposed and lifted. Where/when most project fall into failure, she and her partner begins the long diagnostic/prognostic/improvement cycle.

Shyama  reminds us it is a an effort that is ongoing with more to learn and invites us to come back… It will be a crime if we do not see the next installment of this story as it continues to unfold.

Essential and very practical points abound within her story. One that are be showing up in other stories from around the world- and  hopepfully becoming a  din that must be addressed. With some paraphrasing, here are a few I see tucked in her tail:
1 NGO’s can’t do it alone and succeed; the villagers are needed – with a vastly redefined roll for NGOs.
2 Technical experts/ engineers may not be the social experts – both are needed.
3 Toilets at the onset are not alway seen as valuable/desirable assets. Education is needed before during and after
4 Women and men of the villages do not have the same perspective on sanitation. The project must address both separately as well as together .
5 Villages without ongoing support services will quickly have “…fossils of abandoned stinking toilets allover…”
6 Schools as an institution do not just naturally promote and desire ecosan toilets. They must also be nurtured. (details not addressed in this piece – but would be important to learn more about)
7 Building heathy social stimulus/pressure/ pride must be part of the scope
8 People who want the toilet must be educated on use and care
9 The villagers must be part of the economic model – the social model. Such pieces as manufacturing / construction/ distribution/ sales/ support / education/ promotion/ etc
10 Microfinance is a viable solution – (a work in progress in the story)
11 Toilets can provide a financially valuable natural resource – fertilizer
12 This all makes it a slower road, but it is a viable road, unlike the fast road the many NGO’s are building.
13 100% may be the target but  80% is a not a bad number to start with- and even that require lots of work.

Shyama  reminds us it’s a an effort that is ongoing and invites us to come back ,so to speak.  It will be a crime if we do not see the next installment of this story as it continues to unfold.

 

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Unite For Sight’s Global Health University offers more than 20 online certificate programs

Thu, 29Aug2013 Comments off

press release

Did you know that Unite For Sight’s Global Health University offers more than 20 online certificate programs?  Unite For Sight is a nonprofit organization committed to excellence in global health, and the online certificate programs are designed to develop and nurture current and future global health leaders.  After enrolling, participants may complete the certificate coursework at their own pace.  Please feel free to forward this message to colleagues, students, and friends who may be interested in the online course materials.

 

Eligibility, Enrollment, and Cost

Enrollment in the Certificate in Global Health is available to any student or professional who is interested in global health. The total cost to enroll in the Global Health Certificate Program is $65.

To enroll, please submit your registration fee online at https://maestropay.com/uniteforsight/certificates, and we will provide you with access to the Global Health Certificate Program within one business day.

There is not a deadline for completion, and you may work on the coursework at your own pace.

 

e-Learning course on Governance in Urban Sanitation

Fri, 26Feb2010 Comments off

e-Learning course on Governance in Urban Sanitation


Course Background

In 2000, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Millennium Development Goals that challenged the global community to reduce poverty and increase the health and well-being of all peoples. Two years later, the World Summit on Sustainable Development added access to basic sanitation as a centerpiece of sustainable development strategy and set a series of actions to achieve the global sanitation target – halving the proportion of people without access to basic sanitation by the year 2015.

Yet, nearly 40% of the world’s population still lacks adequate sanitation. Indeed, developing access to sanitation services poses technical, institutional, financial and also social and cultural challenges. Major obstacles relate to governance deficiencies, especially the lack of adequate institutional framework. Other hindrances include the weak priority given to sanitation and the insufficiency of substantial investment in the sector. Besides investment, sustainable solutions should also adequately address the other dimensions, especially institutional and financial aspects. It is thus essential to implement sustainable institutional arrangements ensuring the setting up of a political anchor for the sanitation sector as well as responsiveness to the demand, transparency and accountability to users, financial sustainability, and the involvement of all the actors in their area of expertise.

On the basis of these needs, UNITAR’s Local Development Programme has developed and proposes the e-learning course Governance in Urban Sanitation.

Course Goal
The goal of the course is to enhance the capacity of local decision-makers and sanitation professionals to make the most enlightened decisions and investments in the area of urban sanitation. It provides analytical tools to understand the financial and institutional framework of the sanitation sector, taking into account the needs of urban poor communities.

The course consists of 4 modules:

  • Module 1 – Introduction to Sanitation
  • Module 2 – Economics, Pricing and Financing of the Sanitation Sector
  • Module 3 – Institutional Aspects of the Sanitation Sector
  • Module 4 – Sanitation and Poverty

Learning Objectives
At the end of the course, participants should be able to:
Identify the benefits of sanitation;
Analyze costs and financing of sanitation services;
Identify suitable institutional arrangements and evaluate service provider options, benefits and limits;
Integrate accountability when structuring relationships;
Make communities and microfinance organizations partners in extending sanitation services to the poor;
Assess specific situations and recommend financial and institutional strategies at the local level towards urban sanitation improvement.

Methodology
Learning activities are based on sound adult learning pedagogical principles. They are distributed in such a way to ensure the achievement of the learning objectives in a flexible manner: learning materials can indeed be consulted in a non-linear way so as to provide participants with a high degree of flexibility in choosing both the learning pace that is the most adequate to them. Thus, participants are responsible for their own learning throughout the course. All learning activities are moderated by high level sanitation experts.

Learning materials include the following elements:

  • Basic reading materials (compulsory) intended to understand the basic concepts and principles of modules’ subject-matter;
  • Advanced reading materials (optional) for participants willing to learn more about the topic;
  • External links to relevant, publications, reports and websites;
  • Glossaries of terms and of acronyms as supportive learning tools;
  • A community discussion board (forum) will allow participants to discuss topics initiated by the course moderator and to post questions, comments or new discussions.

The learning time is estimated to be about 5 hours per week. This includes study time (about 3 hours/week) and participation in collaborative activities (about 2 hours/week). Time dedicated to assessment activities is not taken into account in this estimation.

Course Completion & Certification
Successful completion of the course requires participants to achieve a minimum total score of 70% and entitles to a certificate of completion. A certificate of participation will be issued to participants who took all the mandatory exercises but achieved a score inferior to 70%.

Assessment Activities
The assessment activities are organized as follows:

  • A self-assessment quiz which enables participants to analyze their level of knowledge before and during the course, making them able to decide how to approach the learning materials and which parts to focus on. This exercise is not graded and can be taken as many times as desired.
  • 4 tests, corresponding to each one of the 4 course modules, aim at evaluating participants’ comprehension of the course content. The 4 tests altogether account for 40% of the final grade.
  • A case study where participants can apply their knowledge practically. The basis of the case study scenario takes as a basis the concrete situation participants’ municipality/region faces with regards to sanitation. The case study accounts for 40% of the final grade.
  • An innovative peer-to-peer review exercise providing an ideal breeding ground for knowledge and experience sharing. Participants evaluate and discuss each other’s case study in the framework of specific group forums. Ultimately, the moderator will provide comments and grade to each participant related to his/her review of another participant’s case study and subsequent discussions with fellow-participants. The peer-to-peer review accounts for 20% of the final grade.

Conditions of participation
The course is open to decision-makers from local governments as well as representatives of service providers (national governments, private sector, NGOs) and international organizations involved in the sanitation sector worldwide. It is advisable to have prior basic knowledge of urban sanitation and/or urban environmental issues. Participants should also have access to a computer with a reliable Internet connection.

Fee and Registration
Course fee is USD 400 per participant. Deadline for registration is 9 April 2010, or when the course is fully subscribed.

Contact
For further information, contact Mr. Nicolas Plouviez at sanitation@unitar.org.

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