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Posts Tagged ‘WatSan’

Where do yo shit by @WaterForPeple

Tue, 14Jan2014 Comments off

Great video! by Water For People, sure there are a lot of little details not mentioned, but you can not do better for a 5 minute video.

New Book: Sustainable Water and Sanitation Services – Life-Cycle Cost Approach…

Sun, 12Jan2014 Comments off

There is a new book out that looks worthy of getting your library to order:Sustainable Water and Sanitation Services The Life-Cycle Cost Approach to Planning and Management

Sustainable Water and Sanitation Services
The Life-Cycle Cost Approach to Planning and Management

Hardback: $145.00  978-0-415-82818-5  December 24th 2013

Taylor & Francis Group

“Based on the work of the WASHCost project run by the IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre (IRC), this book provides an evaluation of the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) sectors in the context of developing countries and is the first systematic study of applying the life-cycle cost approach to assessing allocations. It presents unit cost estimates of the WASH sector across geographic locations and technologies, including rural and peri-urban areas, and these are compared with service levels. It analyses detailed data from more than 5000 households across nine agro-climatic zones in Andhra Pradesh State in India. Key issues assessed include poverty analysis of service levels, cost drivers and factors at the village and household level, and governance aspects such as transparency, accountability and value for money in relation to unit costs and service levels.

This is the most comprehensive study of the WASH sector in India and elsewhere that utilises the life-cycle cost approach, along with GIS, econometric modelling and qualitative research methods. Not only does it contribute to research and methodology in this area, but the analysis also provides valuable insights for planners, policy makers and bi-lateral donors. The authors show how the methodology can also be applied in other developing country contexts.”

Contents

  1. Introduction
    • V. Ratna Reddy, Catarina Fonseca and Charles Batchelor
  2. WASH Sector in India: The Policy Context
    • V. Kurian Baby and V. Ratna Reddy
  3. Life-Cycle Cost Approach: An Analytical Framework for WASH Sector
    • V. Ratna Reddy, Catarina Fonseca and Charles Batchelor
  4. Unit Costs and Service Levels: Region and Technology-wise
    • V. Ratna Reddy, M. Venkataswamy and M. Snehalatha
  5. Explaining Inter-Village Variations in Drinking Water Provision: Factors Influencing Costs and Service Levels in Rural Andhra Pradesh
    • V. Ratna Reddy
  6. Rural Sanitation and Hygiene: Economic and Institutional Aspects of Sustainable Services
    • V. Ratna Reddy
  7. Nirmal Gram Puraskar and Sanitation Service Levels: Curse of Slippage
    • M. Snehalatha, V. Anitha Raj, P. Bhushan and M. Venkataswamy
  8. Cost of Provision and Managing WASH Services in Peri-Urban Areas
    • G. Alivelu, V. Ratna Reddy, P. Bhushan and V. Anitha Raj
  9. Skewed and Inequitable Access to Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Services
    • M.Snehalatha and James Batchelor
  10. How can Water Security be Improved in Water Scarce Areas of Rural India?
    • Charles Batchelor, James Batchelor and M. Snehalatha
  11. Assessing Progress towards Sustainable Service Delivery in India: Lessons for Rural Water Supply
    • A.J. James
  12. Transparency, Accountability and Participation (TAP): Understanding Governance in Rural WASH Sector
    • M.V. Rama Chandrudu. Safa Fanaian and R. Subramanyam Naidu
  13. Decentralized Governance and Sustainable Service Delivery: A Case of Nenmeni Rural Water Supply Scheme, Kerala, India
    • P.K. Kurian, V. Kurian Baby and Terry Thomas
  14. Provision of Sustainable WASH Services: Policy Options and Imperatives
    • V. Ratna Reddy, Catarina Fonseca and Charles Batchelor

Paper: Domestic Water Source, Sanitation and High Risk of Bacteriological Diseases in the Urban Slum: Case of Cholera in Makoko, Lagos, Nigeria

Sun, 12Jan2014 Comments off

Ayeni A. O.

Department of Geography, University of Lagos, Akoka – Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria

Domestic Water Source, Sanitation and High Risk of Bacteriological Diseases in the Urban Slum: Case of Cholera in Makoko, Lagos, Nigeria

Abstract

This study assesses the cholera incidence in urban slum in Lagos State, Nigeria with the emphasis on high risk of unimproved sources of water for domestic use and unsanitary environment. The study uses sets of one hundred and twenty structured guided questionnaires were randomly administered to obtain information on residents’ opinions and experiences on the risk and incidence of cholera in the area. Ten water samples were spatially collected from storage containers of the residents for microbial assessment Results of social survey instrument showed there was cholera incidence and the area is still at high risk as revealed from the result of coliform bacilli with high most probable number (MPN) count found in 6 of the 16 sampled water as well as the faecal coliform found virtually in all sampled water. The study concluded that increasing population of urban centres has been a major contributor to the unsanitary environmental, continuous use of unimproved sources of water as well as environmental health problems such as slum cholera risk and incidence. Therefore, for sustainable friendly and free diseases’ environment provision of habitable and conducive environment for the slum residents should be the priority of government.
more…

Seeking water and sanitation projects for 2014 Environmental Challenge – Reed Elsevier

Tue, 10Dec2013 Comments off

 $90,000 in prize money to be awarded to winning proposals to help the developing world

By Emmy Stevens | Posted on 9 December 2013

The Reed Elsevier Environmental Challenge awards prize money to three projects that best demonstrate how they can provide sustainable access to safe water or sanitation where it is presently at risk. Projects must have clear practical applicability, address identified needs and advance related issues such as health, education or human rights.

This is the fourth year that Reed Elsevier (Elsevier’s parent company) has held this challenge.

There is a $50,000 prize for the first place entry and a $25,000 prize for the second place entry. Applicants are offered access to Elsevier’s scientific online publications and databases, and for the first time, all applicants will be offered access to LexisNexis Risk Solution’s open source high performance computing (HPCC) resource, to allow them to process large amounts of research data, supported by online training. Winning projects will be highlighted in Elsevier journal Water Research.

For the second year, a $15,000 WASH Alliance prize will be given for the third prize project. The Dutch WASH Alliance is a consortium of six Dutch NGOs promoting access to and hygienic use of sustainable water and sanitation. The WASH Alliance will provide reviewers, judges and funding for the competition, and up to $2,500 towards relevant training and professional development for each winner.

The Environmental Challenge also contributes to the Water for Life Decade (2005-15) established by the UN General Assembly in support of the Millennium Development Goal to reduce by half the proportion of the population without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation.

In addition, it ties into Elsevier’s aim to facilitate the exchange and dissemination of scientific information – in this case, information on improving access to a sustainable water supply and sanitation.

The 2014 challenge was launched at Pollutec Horizons in Paris, organized by Reed Exhibitions.

How to enter

The 2014 Reed Elsevier Environmental Challenge is open to individuals or organizations operating in the nonprofit and for-profit sectors. Projects must advance sustainable access to safe water or improved sanitation where it is presently at risk and include the following criteria:

  • Be replicable, scalable and sustainable and set a benchmark for innovation
  • Have practical applicability
  • Address non-discrimination/equity of access
  • Involve and impact a range of stakeholders
  • Have local/community-level engagement

Applications will be accepted through April 1, 2014. For more information, visit the Reed Elsevier Environmental Challenge website and apply here.

 

New paper: Assessment of women’s participation in community based projects in water & sanitation – Kangundo, Kenya

Thu, 21Nov2013 Comments off

Munuvi, Dorcas Ngina
Date: 2013-11-13

Assessment of women’s participation in community Based projects in upper manza water and sanitation Project in Tala Division, Kangundo District

Abstract:

This study sought to assess the participation of women in community based projects. The major focus was on participation of women in Upper Manza Water and Sanitation Project. The’ study used purposive sampling to select key project officials and local leaders. Other participants were selected through stratified random sampling to give primary data with the qualitative data analyzed using Microsoft word editor. This data was also collated and organized according to the study objectives. Evidence from this study showed that women in Upper Manza Water and Sanitation Project have not fully taken their numerical advantage to assert their contributions in running the project. This is despite they being the main beneficiaries of improved water management in the community; their substantial contributions are largely hidden behind social norms regarding gender roles and relations. It is, therefore, recommended that women’s empowerment must be the concern of both women and men and the degree to which a project is defined as potentially empowering women is shown by the extent to which it addresses women’s practical and immediate needs. more….
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Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s Urges Sanitation Be at Heart of Post-2015 Dev Framework

Sat, 09Nov2013 Comments off

Press Release

In Message for World Toilet Day, Secretary-General Urges that Sanitation Be at Heart of Post-2015 Development Framework

Following is UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s message for World Toilet Day, observed on 19 November:

Each year, more than 800,000 children under five die needlessly from diarrhoea — more than one child a minute.  Countless others fall seriously ill, with many suffering long-term health and developmental consequences.  Poor sanitation and hygiene are the primary cause.  Worldwide, some 2.5 billion people lack the benefits of adequate sanitation.  More than 1 billion people practise open defecation.  We must break the taboos and make sanitation for all a global development priority.

This first official observance by the United Nations of World Toilet Day is an opportunity to highlight this important topic.  Sanitation is central to human and environmental health.  It is essential for sustainable development, dignity and opportunity.  Poor water and sanitation cost developing countries around $260 billion a year — 1.5 per cent of their gross domestic product (GDP).  On the other hand, every dollar invested can bring a five-fold return by keeping people healthy and productive.  When schools offer decent toilets, 11 per cent more girls attend.  When women have access to a private latrine, they are less vulnerable to assault.

Despite the compelling moral and economic case for action on sanitation, progress has been too little and too slow.  That is why I launched a Call to Action on Sanitation this year to end open defecation by 2025 and build on existing efforts, such as Sanitation and Water for All and the Sanitation Drive to 2015, the target date for achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

We are a long way from achieving the MDG target of reducing by half the proportion of people lacking adequate sanitation.  We must urgently step up our efforts, with all actors working together for rapid, tangible results.  And, as we look beyond 2015, it is essential that sanitation is placed at the heart of the post-2015 development framework.  The solutions need not be expensive or technology driven.  There are many successful models that can be replicated and scaled up.  We must also work to educate at-risk communities and change cultural perceptions and long-standing practices that have no place in our modern world.

By working together — and by having an open and frank discussion on the importance of toilets and sanitation — we can improve the health and well-being of one third of the human family.  That is the goal of World Toilet Day.

Learn more  at the World Toilet Day Site:

What is World Toilet Day ?

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World Toilet Day is observed annually on 19 November. This international day of action aims to break the taboo around toilets and draw attention to the global sanitation challenge.

Can you imagine not having a toilet? Can you imagine not having privacy when you need to relieve yourself? Although unthinkable for those living in wealthy parts of the world, this is a harsh reality for many – in fact, one in three people on this globe, does not have access to a toilet! Have you ever thought about the true meaning of dignity?

World Toilet Day was created to pose exactly these kind of questions and to raise global awareness of the daily struggle for proper sanitation that a staggering 2.5 billion people face. World Toilet Day brings together different groups, such as media, the private sector, development organisations and civil society in a global movement to advocate for safe toilets. Since its inception in 2001, World Toilet Day has become an important platform to demand action from governments and to reach out to wider audiences by showing that toilets can be fun and sexy as well as vital to life.  more…

Paper: Estimating child health equity potential of improved sanitation – Nepal

Tue, 24Sep2013 Comments off

paper

Conceptual framework for using LiST to estimate the lives saved from WSS interventions  Acharya et al. BMC Public Health 2013 13(Suppl 3):S25   doi:10.1186/1471-2458-13-S3-S25 Anjali Acharya,  Li Liu, Qingfeng Li and Ingrid K Friberg

Department of International Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA

Estimating the child health equity potential of improved sanitation in Nepal

Abstract

Background

Access to improved sanitation plays an important role in child health through its impact on diarrheal mortality and malnutrition. Inequities in sanitation coverage translate into health inequities across socio-economic groups. This paper presents the differential impact on child mortality and diarrheal incidence of expanding sanitation coverage across wealth quintiles in Nepal.

Methods

We modeled three scale up coverage scenarios at the national level and at each of the 5 wealth quintiles for improved sanitation in Nepal in the Lives Saved Tool (LiST): equal for all quintiles, realistically pro-poor and ambitiously pro-poor.

Results

The results show that equal improvement in sanitation coverage can save a total of 226 lives (10.7% of expected diarrhea deaths), while a realistically pro-poor program can save 451 child lives (20.5%) and the ambitiously pro-poor program can save 542 lives (24.6%).

Conclusions

Pro-poor policies for expanding sanitation coverage have the ability to reduce population level health inequalities which can translate into reduced child diarrheal mortality.  more….

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