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Posts Tagged ‘water’

Where do yo shit by @WaterForPeple

Tue, 14Jan2014 Comments off

Great video! by Water For People, sure there are a lot of little details not mentioned, but you can not do better for a 5 minute video.

New Book: Sustainable Water and Sanitation Services – Life-Cycle Cost Approach…

Sun, 12Jan2014 Comments off

There is a new book out that looks worthy of getting your library to order:Sustainable Water and Sanitation Services The Life-Cycle Cost Approach to Planning and Management

Sustainable Water and Sanitation Services
The Life-Cycle Cost Approach to Planning and Management

Hardback: $145.00  978-0-415-82818-5  December 24th 2013

Taylor & Francis Group

“Based on the work of the WASHCost project run by the IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre (IRC), this book provides an evaluation of the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) sectors in the context of developing countries and is the first systematic study of applying the life-cycle cost approach to assessing allocations. It presents unit cost estimates of the WASH sector across geographic locations and technologies, including rural and peri-urban areas, and these are compared with service levels. It analyses detailed data from more than 5000 households across nine agro-climatic zones in Andhra Pradesh State in India. Key issues assessed include poverty analysis of service levels, cost drivers and factors at the village and household level, and governance aspects such as transparency, accountability and value for money in relation to unit costs and service levels.

This is the most comprehensive study of the WASH sector in India and elsewhere that utilises the life-cycle cost approach, along with GIS, econometric modelling and qualitative research methods. Not only does it contribute to research and methodology in this area, but the analysis also provides valuable insights for planners, policy makers and bi-lateral donors. The authors show how the methodology can also be applied in other developing country contexts.”

Contents

  1. Introduction
    • V. Ratna Reddy, Catarina Fonseca and Charles Batchelor
  2. WASH Sector in India: The Policy Context
    • V. Kurian Baby and V. Ratna Reddy
  3. Life-Cycle Cost Approach: An Analytical Framework for WASH Sector
    • V. Ratna Reddy, Catarina Fonseca and Charles Batchelor
  4. Unit Costs and Service Levels: Region and Technology-wise
    • V. Ratna Reddy, M. Venkataswamy and M. Snehalatha
  5. Explaining Inter-Village Variations in Drinking Water Provision: Factors Influencing Costs and Service Levels in Rural Andhra Pradesh
    • V. Ratna Reddy
  6. Rural Sanitation and Hygiene: Economic and Institutional Aspects of Sustainable Services
    • V. Ratna Reddy
  7. Nirmal Gram Puraskar and Sanitation Service Levels: Curse of Slippage
    • M. Snehalatha, V. Anitha Raj, P. Bhushan and M. Venkataswamy
  8. Cost of Provision and Managing WASH Services in Peri-Urban Areas
    • G. Alivelu, V. Ratna Reddy, P. Bhushan and V. Anitha Raj
  9. Skewed and Inequitable Access to Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Services
    • M.Snehalatha and James Batchelor
  10. How can Water Security be Improved in Water Scarce Areas of Rural India?
    • Charles Batchelor, James Batchelor and M. Snehalatha
  11. Assessing Progress towards Sustainable Service Delivery in India: Lessons for Rural Water Supply
    • A.J. James
  12. Transparency, Accountability and Participation (TAP): Understanding Governance in Rural WASH Sector
    • M.V. Rama Chandrudu. Safa Fanaian and R. Subramanyam Naidu
  13. Decentralized Governance and Sustainable Service Delivery: A Case of Nenmeni Rural Water Supply Scheme, Kerala, India
    • P.K. Kurian, V. Kurian Baby and Terry Thomas
  14. Provision of Sustainable WASH Services: Policy Options and Imperatives
    • V. Ratna Reddy, Catarina Fonseca and Charles Batchelor

Free Course: Designing and Implementing Successful Water Supply and Sanitation Utility Reform

Sun, 12Jan2014 Comments off

Free online course from the World Bank:

In emerging markets, many water supply and sanitation utilities are locked in a vicious spiral of weak performance, insufficient funding, deterioration of assets, institutional discrepancies and political interference. This is largely the consequence of poor governance, ineffective and misdirected policies, and the monopolistic nature of the sector.To help support reform in the water and sanitation sectors, the World Bank Institute (WBI) has developed a core learning program in “Designing and Implementing Successful Utility Reform.” The objective of the program is to provide government officials, senior managers of utilities and technical staff with the knowledge, skills and tools for initiating and sustaining reform. This e-learning program, which consists of lessons, case studies and exercises, supports stakeholders to reform their water utility.Target Audience:
Mid-level managers and technical specialists who are responsible for change in their organization. more…
 
 

About the e-Institute:

 
This unique global portal is designed to support self-motivated learners who want to get up to speed on the latest development trends, enhance their skills, and share knowledge through on-line learning communities.
Connect.  Learn.  Innovate.  Inspire.

 

One of the greatest challenges facing today’s development practitioners is the dearth of affordable, innovative, and practitioner-focused training on the “how to” of policy reform and proven good practices customized to local needs. Tight training budgets and time constraints preclude travel to a central location for high quality, hands-on learning. The e-Institute was launched as a virtual learning classroom to provide convenient, easy, and reliable access to cutting edge knowledge and communities of practice. More than forty-five e-Learning courses address complex real-world problems in priority areas such as governance, health, cities, climate change, and public private partnerships. Learners also have access to free monthly podcasts and webinars, video success stories, multimedia toolkits, and other resources. source…

New paper: Assessment of women’s participation in community based projects in water & sanitation – Kangundo, Kenya

Thu, 21Nov2013 Comments off

Munuvi, Dorcas Ngina
Date: 2013-11-13

Assessment of women’s participation in community Based projects in upper manza water and sanitation Project in Tala Division, Kangundo District

Abstract:

This study sought to assess the participation of women in community based projects. The major focus was on participation of women in Upper Manza Water and Sanitation Project. The’ study used purposive sampling to select key project officials and local leaders. Other participants were selected through stratified random sampling to give primary data with the qualitative data analyzed using Microsoft word editor. This data was also collated and organized according to the study objectives. Evidence from this study showed that women in Upper Manza Water and Sanitation Project have not fully taken their numerical advantage to assert their contributions in running the project. This is despite they being the main beneficiaries of improved water management in the community; their substantial contributions are largely hidden behind social norms regarding gender roles and relations. It is, therefore, recommended that women’s empowerment must be the concern of both women and men and the degree to which a project is defined as potentially empowering women is shown by the extent to which it addresses women’s practical and immediate needs. more….
c

Paper: Understanding the Poor Performance of Urban Sewerage System – case study

Mon, 21Oct2013 Comments off

Author: Annatoria Chinyama, Tendai Toma

Department of Civil and Water Engineering, National University of Science and Technology, P.O Box AC939, Ascot, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe

Understanding the Poor Performance of Urban Sewerage Systems – A Case of Coldstream High Density Suburbs, Chinhoyi, Zimbabwe

Abstract:

The population of Coldstream High Density Suburbs in Chinhoyi, Zimbabwe is increasing and the sewerage system shows signs of poor performance. The frequency of reported sewerage system blockages in the suburb increased from 43 per month to 65 per month between April 2012 and March 2013. The suburb has also been experiencing water shortages. An increasing population and low water supply versus overflowing sewage is a potential health risk.

The main objective of this paper was to investigate the causes of the sewer system poor performance. This was achieved by assessing the sewer system infrastructure as well as the operation of the system. The impact of the behaviour of residents on the performance of the system was also discussed. The main components of the infrastructure (manholes and sewers) were physically checked for soundness. The operation of the system was assessed by a hydraulic analysis of discharge, depth of flow and velocity of flow in the sewers. Questionnaires were used to investigate the impact of the behaviour of residents on the performance of the sewer system.

It was found that 4% of the components of the sewer system infrastructure were below standard and the collector main sewer was the one mainly affected. 68% of the sewers along the collector main had velocity of flow below 0.6m/s and all the sewers had depth of flow below 50%. Of the residents interviewed, 90% dumped solid wastes in the sewers and 43% did so because they were unaware of the impact.

It was concluded that the sewer system failed to meet standard because the sewer system fails to self-cleanse the solid waste dumped by residents in the sewers due to water shortages. It is recommended that the municipality raises awareness among residents and some of the infrastructure should be rehabilitated. more…

Call for papers: Global Public Health Conference: Kattankulathur India

Mon, 07Oct2013 Comments off

Press Release

Global Public Health Conference GPHCON at SRM University, Kattankulathur

- Call for papers

- Last Date: November 30, 2013

  GPHCON 2014


Pre Conference Workshop -Thursday 20th February 2014

Conference – 21-23 February, 2014

Organized by : School of Public Health ,SRM University
Supported by : Distinguished Members of Public Health Associations of India

Secretariat
School of Public Health, III Floor, Medical College Building
SRM University ,SRM Nagar, Kattankulathur
Tamil Nadu-603203, India, Tel- +91-44-27455771
Email- gphcon2014@srmuniv.ac.in

For details: http://gphcon2014.wix.com/gphcon#!organising-committe-/c1d94

Greetings from the Organizing Committee -GPHCON2014 It is our privilege to intimate you that School of Public Health SRM University will be organizing Global Public Health Conference in February 21-23, 2014 and the pre-conference workshop is on February 20, 2014. The theme of the conference is “Multi- disciplinary Approaches in Public Health: innovations, practices and Future Strategies” and about 25 sub themes focuses on multi-disciplinary approaches.

The aim of this conference is to bring the public health professionals from various disciplines to a single platform and share their technical expertise for the benefit of the people and the world. If you are working actively with public health systems or practicing public health at any level we invite you to share your rich experience in the conference. Your participation would add great value to the conference and you will certainly enjoy being among the renowned intellectual expertise.

The venue of the conference is SRM University, Near Chennai. SRM University is the first private University in India and has many glorious achievements to its credit. SRM launched the Nano satellite named, SRMSAT in the year 2012: it has been designed by students and faculties of SRM University. The crowning glory for the SRM University is in being the first private University in India to host the 98th Indian Science Congress that was hosted with the theme “Quality Education and Excellence in Scientific Research in Indian Universities” was formally inaugurated by the Prime Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh in the year 2010 which was attended by more than 10,400 delegates from India and abroad including six Nobel Laureates has participated.

Keeping the legacy of organizing the large national and international conferences we School of Public Health, SRM University invite your august participation in the conference.

ABOUT THE UNIVERSITY SRM

University is one of the top ranking universities in India with over 20,000 students and 1,500 faculties, offering a wide range of undergraduate, postgraduate, and doctoral programs in Engineering, Management, Medicine and Health Sciences, and Science and Humanities. SRM University with multiple institutions having been established 28 years ago is one of the largest private Universities in India. Over two and half decades, SRM University has set standards in experimental education and knowledge creation across various fields. Over 600 acres replete with a variety of facilities, State-of-the-art labs, libraries, Wi-Fi, Knowledge centre, 4500 capacity AC auditorium, 100 online smart classrooms and hostels with premium facilities.

SRM University is the first private university in India to launch the Nano satellite named, SRMSAT: it has been designed by students and faculties of SRM University. The design is made robust enough support different payloads and act as Nano Bus for further mission. By this process SRM University would be able to provide qualified and trained scientist and technological manpower in satellite technology. Added to the crowning glory for the SRM University is that the 98th Indian Science Congress was hosted with the theme “Quality Education and Excellence in Scientific Research in Indian Universities”, was formally inaugurated by the Prime Minister in which more than 10,400 delegates from India and abroad including six Nobel Laureates has participated.

ABOUT THE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Emerging as a School of Excellence in the 6 years of genesis, our staff brings experience in multiple disciplines and have hands on experience in local, national, and international health settings. Our capabilities in research, knowledge and practice have been tested time to time and proved successful..School of Public Health intercepts into many inter related disciplines, which have key elements in common that bring us together. School of Public Health, because of its unique standing is a powerful tool in bring about balance. The School works on “hubs and spokes” model linking many departments that include Medicine, Engineering, Nursing and Management in its manifold to function effectively. Postgraduate program in the School of Public Health is designed for graduates, who aspire to be leaders and professionals in public health, who aspire to reach high-level roles nationally and internationally. Our students come from all parts of India and a few International students from the Far East. They have relevant academic and work experience. Majority of our students have a prior health related degree, and we have students from various disciplines like Arts, Humanities and Engineering. We have Doctors and Public Health Officers nominated from various states and Union Territories.

This program prepares health professionals from a varied range of backgrounds, with knowledge and skills from a variety of disciplines, to define, critically assess and resolve public health and nutrition problems. Various fields of study allow students to focus on Indian public health issues and international public health, including nutrition and tropical health.

Theme   “Multi-disciplinary Approaches in Public Health: Innovations, Practices and Future Strategies”

Sub- Theme

  • Public Health Policy,
  • Public Health Education,
  • Pharmacovigilance in Public Health,
  • AYUSH and Public Health, Community Health,
  • Public Health Nursing, Public Health Engineering,
  • Health Analytics, Public Health Ethics and Legalities,
  • Veterinary Public Health, Occupational and Industrial Health,
  • Public Health Promotion and Behaviour Change Communication,
  • Migration Refugees and Urban Public Health, Public Health Nutrition,
  • Hospitality Industry and Public Health, Economics of Public Health,
  • Reproductive and Child Health Management in Public Health,
  • Water Sanitation and Hygiene, Equity Issues in Public Health,
  • Environmental Public Health, Public Health Research ,
  • CSR in Public Health, Role of NGOs in Public Health,
  • Medical Public Health, Public Health Dentistry,
  • Information Technology and Public Health
  • Disaster and Public Health

Abstract Submission

Authors who wish to submit abstract should follow the format for abstract submission that can be downloaded from the website. Abstracts should be written in English. Abstracts that are submitted must NOT have been previously presented in any other conference or published anywhere in any form.

Abstract should not exceed 300 words. It must be prepared in MS Word format. A 12 point font, Times New Roman, 1.5 line spacing should be used. Abstracts should be structured one with following sub-headings indicating in bold – Background; Objectives; Methods; Results; Conclusion. Always define abbreviations and acronyms including standard measures. Place special or unusual abbreviations in parentheses after the full word the first time it appears. Each abstract must be complete, i.e. it must include all information necessary for its comprehension and not refer to another text.

We encourage applying though online submission; however for the convenience the abstract can be emailed to gphcon.2014@srmuniv.edu.in. The submitted abstract will be reviewed by the expert committee and the authors will be notified about the acceptance by Email. If accepted for presentation the selected authors are requested to submit the full paper.

o Deadline for abstract submission – November 30, 2013.
o Last date for submission of full paper – December 31, 2013
o After you complete your submission, you will receive an e-mail that confirms your submission was successfully received.
o Keep a copy of your abstract submission for your records.

Paper: Human rights & health systems development: Confronting the politics… Duncan Maru & Paul Farmer

Fri, 20Sep2013 Comments off

paper/article:

Duncan Maru and Paul Farmer

Publication: Health and Human Rights    (From listing of articles/papers Wednesday, August 14, 2013)

Human rights and health systems development: Confronting the politics of exclusion and the economics of inequality

Abstract

The social movements of the last two decades have fostered a rights-based approach to health systems development within the global discourse on national and international health governance. In this piece, we discuss ongoing challenges in the cavernous “implementation gap ”— translating legislative victories for human rights into actual practice and delivery. Using accompaniment as an underlying principle, we focus primarily on constructing effective, equitable, and accountable public sector health systems. Public sector health care delivery is challenged by increasingly exclusive politics and inequitable economic policies that severely limit the participatory power of marginalized people. Finally, we discuss the role of implementation science in closing the delivery gap.
 

Introduction: The right to health

The human rights approach to public health systems development has been a central theme to emerge from the explosive growth in global health awareness and funding in the last two decades.1  The notion that health care systems are both national and international public goods protecting the essential rights of all citizens, while not wholly embraced, has gained traction in global debates about health care financing, governance, and implementation.2 In this piece, we discuss challenges in translating consensus around health as a human right into one particular aspect of the right to health: namely, access to effective health care systems that reach the most vulnerable.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was published in 1948,3 marking the start of the modern human rights movement. The poles of civil and political rights versus social and economic rights established during the Cold War era prevailed until the early 1990s, when a relative consensus emerged that the different human rights domains should be integrated. The global movement to combat HIV/AIDS represents the broadest, deepest, most concerted effort to date to forge a link between health and human rights. It is no coincidence that this movement was initiated, expanded, and sustained by individuals from communities bearing the highest burdens of HIV disease.  The movement was successful because it was driven and led by individuals directly affected by the epidemic. This movement both globalized public health and connected it to the rights agenda.4

A major challenge in translating the successes of the HIV/AIDS movement into broader health systems change is deepening the involvement of citizens who would be most impacted by such changes—often the most marginalized populations.  Wealthier citizens tend to be able to rely on for-profit, privatized health services and therefore have little incentive to partner with poorer citizens to advance public sector health systems change.

Herein lies a paradox in health and human rights. At no time in human history has health as a human right been as prominent in international and national health discourse as it is now. Yet we also face ongoing expansion of the politics of exclusion and the economics of inequality, which pose immense challenges to implementing human rights-based advances.  Human rights legislation without effective delivery systems is impotent; effective delivery systems without human rights protections (for example, legislative guarantees) will fail to deliver to the most vulnerable.

For health systems development, why does the rights-based view remain relevant today? While much has changed, the underlying forces driving health inequity remain the same. We believe that effective health care systems must guarantee the right to health for our most vulnerable citizens. While this is a sweeping statement, it is important to differentiate this rights-based approach from other approaches that seek merely to reduce population disease, maximize cost-effectiveness, or facilitate rational private investment in health. Our stance is a fundamentally moral one, rooted in the lived experiences of our patients, but it is also deeply pragmatic. To free the world’s poor from the diseases that continue to stalk them, we must build better public sector systems. more….

About the Publication: Health and Human Rights:

Health and Human Rights began publication in 1994 under the editorship of Jonathan Mann. Paul Farmer, co-founder of Partners In Health, assumed the editorship in 2007. Health and Human Rights is an online, open-access publication.

Health and Human Rights provides an inclusive forum for action-oriented dialogue among human rights practitioners. The journal endeavors to increase access to human rights knowledge in the health field by linking an expanded community of readers and contributors. Following the lead of a growing number of open access publications, the full text of Health and Human Rights is freely available to anyone with internet access.

Health and Human Rights focuses rigorous scholarly analysis on the conceptual foundations and challenges of rights discourse and action in relation to health. The journal is dedicated to empowering new voices from the field — highlighting the innovative work of groups and individuals in direct engagement with human rights struggles as they relate to health. We seek to foster engaged scholarship and reflective activism. In doing so, we invite informed action to realize the full spectrum of human rights. more…

This article is important in its own right.  WASHLink believes Hygiene, Sanitation, Water,  & Public Health can not, must not, should not be siloed. If we shall build apart we shall fall together, so while not addressed directly, we  see there is a underlying appeal in this article for such. We encourage you to read on, and explore the invaluable site it is posted on. We can hope this article and other articles found on the Health and Human Rights site  reach the eye of the policy makers and  there minions that execute their edicts. While perhaps trite: we all have  some responsibility  / some role to play in moving this forward.

Zimba the Automatic Chlorine Doser / Chlorinator: Suprio Das at TEDxGateway

Tue, 17Sep2013 Comments off

After working for more than 20 years as an electrical engineer with different business houses, Suprio realized that life could be more meaningful and interesting than this scramble up the corporate ladder. He gave up his job …
His latest project Zimba the automatic chlorine doser, was selected by researchers of Stanford University and icddr-b for trials in the slums of Dhaka. These dosers are in operation since February 2012 and are currently serving around 50 families. A single device is also under pilot trial with Spring Health (a Paul Polak initiative) in Orissa…. more…

Related posts / information

other  related TED /  TEDx talks mentioned on this site

Environmental Enteropathy and WASH Webinar – Sept. 11

Fri, 06Sep2013 Comments off

 

Press release

Curious about the growing talk about the importance of “gut health” and its role in growth and nutrition and how better WASH practices can reduce stunting? 

Please join us for a webinar presentation and discussion on Environmental Enteropathy and WASH on Wednesday, September 11, from 11:00am – 12:30 pm Eastern Standard Time (EST), which is New York time.The very best programs focusing on nutritional intake have only solved 1/3 of the stunting problem, and no nutritional research trial has ever normalized linear growth. Adequate diet is necessary for healthy growth, but is not sufficient. Meanwhile, improved water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) is associated with decreased stunting and has the same average effect size as the very best infant feeding interventions. We now know that a condition of the child’s intestine — environmental enteropathy (EE) — is brought on by living in a dirty environment, can have a very profound impact on stunting, and can be partially reversed through WASH interventions.

Come hear the latest on these important findings about EE from Laura Smith with Cornell University and how WASH can be integrated into USAID nutrition and other programs.

This event is sponsored by the USAID WASH, Nutrition and Feed the Future Community of Practice with support from the USAID TOPS and WASHplus projects.

To Participate:

You can participate in this online event through Fuze at http://fuze.me/20908746 on the day/time of the webinar. No need to preregister. To join the audio, please choose one of two methods: 1) Internet Audio, and simply select the internet audio option after joining; or 2) Use your phone and call +1348177654. If prompted, enter the meeting number: 20908746, then press #.

If you have any questions about this event or issues using Fuze, please contact Patrick Coonan at mailto:coonanfsn@gmail.com

about:

“The WASHplus project creates supportive environments for healthy households and communities by delivering high-impact interventions in water supply, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) and indoor air pollution (IAP). WASHplus uses proven, at-scale interventions to reduce diarrheal diseases and acute respiratory infections, the two top killers of children under five years of age globally. WASHplus has expertise to integrate WASH and IAP activities into existing education, HIV/AIDS, maternal and child health, and nutrition programs. WASHplus builds strong in-country partnerships to increase impact. In addition, WASHplus is charged with exploring and promoting innovation in the WASH and IAP sectors. WASHplus is funded by the United States Agency for International Development’s Bureau for Global Health.more…

USAID: “In an interconnected world, instability anywhere around the world can impact us here at home. Working side-by-side with the military in active conflicts, USAID plays a critical role in our nation’s effort to  stabilize countries and build responsive local governance; we work on the same problems as our military using a different set of tools. We also ease the transition between conflict and long-term development by investing in agriculture, health systems and democratic institutions. And while USAID can work in active conflict, or help countries transition from violence, the most important thing we can do is prevent conflict in the first place. This is smarter, safer and less costly than sending in soldiers.

USAID extends help from the American  people to achieve results for the poorest  and most vulnerable around the world. That assistance does not represent a Democratic value or a Republican value, but an American value; as beneficiaries of peace and prosperity, Americans have a responsibility to assist those less fortunate so we see the day when our assistance is no longer necessary.” more…

New Portable Water Quality Test Used Successfully in Low Resource Settings Worldwide

Tue, 02Jul2013 2 comments

    CHAPEL HILL, NC, July 02, 2013 /24-7PressRelease/ — The Aquagenx Compartment Bag Test (CBT) is a new portable water test kit that lets anyone in any setting determine if their drinking water poses a potential health risk.

The CBT is the only portable, self-contained, household level water quality test that detects and quantifies E. coli levels in the World Health Organization 100mL standard sample, requires no electricity or lab, provides built-in decontamination and requires no incubator at temperatures above 25 degrees Celsius. It eliminates costs for refrigeration, sample transportation, lab sample analysis and processing and highly trained, specialized technicians.

Compact and self-contained, the CBT provides microbial water testing in a few simple steps with easy-to-score, visual, color change results.

The CBT has many benefits for water, sanitation and hygiene programs:

+ Provides quantitative water quality results based on the World Health Organization’s risk categories
+ Enables water quality testing even in low resource and disaster settings
+ Allows individuals and communities to make informed decisions about the safety of their drinking water and actions needed to improve water quality
+ Eliminates costs for refrigeration, sample transportation, lab sample analysis and processing, and highly trained, specialized technicians
+ Removes indirect costs associated with other water testing products such as labor costs that address product requirements, recleaning and sterilization of reusable testing components, required supporting equipment and excessive test waste
+ Expands and improves efficiency of water testing programs

Testing water quality is an essential component of any water, sanitation and hygiene program. The CBT now makes it possible for anyone, in any location or environment, to detect fecal bacteria in drinking water, determine if their water is safe to drink and monitor water quality.

Dr. Mark Sobsey , the creator of the CBT, is an authority on water quality and a distinguished professor at the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health. “It’s impossible to tell if water poses a health risk just by looking at it,” says Sobsey. “Drinking water has to be tested and monitored on an ongoing basis to insure continued safety. In developing countries and rural areas, the ability for local authorities and inhabitants to test water is severely limited. Yet a day without safe water is a day of being at risk of waterborne disease.

“Drinking water quality test kits should be accessible and easy to use, so that people can be informed and empowered to take appropriate action when their drinking water poses a risk to their health.”

Already used throughout the world, the CBT provides quantitative drinking water quality test results based on the World Health Organization risk categories and country standards. The CBT has been tested extensively by third parties against other standard testing methods and provides results on par with more complicated, expensive and less portable tests.

Aquagenx customers include major universities, global NGOs and government entities, and private companies focused on water quality testing, provision of safe household and community drinking water and water research.

Aquagenx, LLC is a social enterprise formed around years of research and development at the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health. Led by Dr. Mark Sobsey and Dr. Ku McMahan, Aquagenx developed and commercialized the Compartment Bag Test (CBT) to improve monitoring of drinking water in low resource settings and help prevent the millions of deaths that occur annually due to contaminated drinking water.

The CBT is the only portable, self-contained, household level water quality test that detects and quantifies E. coli levels in a WHO 100mL standard sample, requires no electricity or lab, provides built-in decontamination and requires no incubator at temperatures above 25 degrees Celsius. It eliminates costs for refrigeration, sample transportation, lab sample analysis and processing and highly trained, specialized technicians.

Website: www.aquagenx.com (source of both images)

More details

Aquagenx, LLC |  (on site of Campus Y)


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