Archive

Posts Tagged ‘hygiene’

Catarina de Albuquerque 2013 Health and Human Rights Lecture @UNCH2OInstitute

Tue, 14Jan2014 Comments off

 

Published on Nov 25, 2013

Catarina de Albuquerque, a leading human rights expert and the first United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to safe drinking water and sanitation, delivers the 2013 UNC Health and Human Rights Lecture, “Implementing Human Rights to Eliminate Inequalities in Water and Sanitation.”
DOWNLOAD THE PODCAST: https://itunes.apple.com/us/itunes-u/…

The event is co-sponsored by the Center for Bioethics, the Department of Public Policy, the Water Institute at UNC and the Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases at UNC. It is part of the University’s campus-wide theme, ‘Water in Our World.’

 

Where do yo shit by @WaterForPeple

Tue, 14Jan2014 Comments off

Great video! by Water For People, sure there are a lot of little details not mentioned, but you can not do better for a 5 minute video.

New Book: Sustainable Water and Sanitation Services – Life-Cycle Cost Approach…

Sun, 12Jan2014 Comments off

There is a new book out that looks worthy of getting your library to order:Sustainable Water and Sanitation Services The Life-Cycle Cost Approach to Planning and Management

Sustainable Water and Sanitation Services
The Life-Cycle Cost Approach to Planning and Management

Hardback: $145.00  978-0-415-82818-5  December 24th 2013

Taylor & Francis Group

“Based on the work of the WASHCost project run by the IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre (IRC), this book provides an evaluation of the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) sectors in the context of developing countries and is the first systematic study of applying the life-cycle cost approach to assessing allocations. It presents unit cost estimates of the WASH sector across geographic locations and technologies, including rural and peri-urban areas, and these are compared with service levels. It analyses detailed data from more than 5000 households across nine agro-climatic zones in Andhra Pradesh State in India. Key issues assessed include poverty analysis of service levels, cost drivers and factors at the village and household level, and governance aspects such as transparency, accountability and value for money in relation to unit costs and service levels.

This is the most comprehensive study of the WASH sector in India and elsewhere that utilises the life-cycle cost approach, along with GIS, econometric modelling and qualitative research methods. Not only does it contribute to research and methodology in this area, but the analysis also provides valuable insights for planners, policy makers and bi-lateral donors. The authors show how the methodology can also be applied in other developing country contexts.”

Contents

  1. Introduction
    • V. Ratna Reddy, Catarina Fonseca and Charles Batchelor
  2. WASH Sector in India: The Policy Context
    • V. Kurian Baby and V. Ratna Reddy
  3. Life-Cycle Cost Approach: An Analytical Framework for WASH Sector
    • V. Ratna Reddy, Catarina Fonseca and Charles Batchelor
  4. Unit Costs and Service Levels: Region and Technology-wise
    • V. Ratna Reddy, M. Venkataswamy and M. Snehalatha
  5. Explaining Inter-Village Variations in Drinking Water Provision: Factors Influencing Costs and Service Levels in Rural Andhra Pradesh
    • V. Ratna Reddy
  6. Rural Sanitation and Hygiene: Economic and Institutional Aspects of Sustainable Services
    • V. Ratna Reddy
  7. Nirmal Gram Puraskar and Sanitation Service Levels: Curse of Slippage
    • M. Snehalatha, V. Anitha Raj, P. Bhushan and M. Venkataswamy
  8. Cost of Provision and Managing WASH Services in Peri-Urban Areas
    • G. Alivelu, V. Ratna Reddy, P. Bhushan and V. Anitha Raj
  9. Skewed and Inequitable Access to Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Services
    • M.Snehalatha and James Batchelor
  10. How can Water Security be Improved in Water Scarce Areas of Rural India?
    • Charles Batchelor, James Batchelor and M. Snehalatha
  11. Assessing Progress towards Sustainable Service Delivery in India: Lessons for Rural Water Supply
    • A.J. James
  12. Transparency, Accountability and Participation (TAP): Understanding Governance in Rural WASH Sector
    • M.V. Rama Chandrudu. Safa Fanaian and R. Subramanyam Naidu
  13. Decentralized Governance and Sustainable Service Delivery: A Case of Nenmeni Rural Water Supply Scheme, Kerala, India
    • P.K. Kurian, V. Kurian Baby and Terry Thomas
  14. Provision of Sustainable WASH Services: Policy Options and Imperatives
    • V. Ratna Reddy, Catarina Fonseca and Charles Batchelor

Paper: Estimating child health equity potential of improved sanitation – Nepal

Tue, 24Sep2013 Comments off

paper

Conceptual framework for using LiST to estimate the lives saved from WSS interventions  Acharya et al. BMC Public Health 2013 13(Suppl 3):S25   doi:10.1186/1471-2458-13-S3-S25 Anjali Acharya,  Li Liu, Qingfeng Li and Ingrid K Friberg

Department of International Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA

Estimating the child health equity potential of improved sanitation in Nepal

Abstract

Background

Access to improved sanitation plays an important role in child health through its impact on diarrheal mortality and malnutrition. Inequities in sanitation coverage translate into health inequities across socio-economic groups. This paper presents the differential impact on child mortality and diarrheal incidence of expanding sanitation coverage across wealth quintiles in Nepal.

Methods

We modeled three scale up coverage scenarios at the national level and at each of the 5 wealth quintiles for improved sanitation in Nepal in the Lives Saved Tool (LiST): equal for all quintiles, realistically pro-poor and ambitiously pro-poor.

Results

The results show that equal improvement in sanitation coverage can save a total of 226 lives (10.7% of expected diarrhea deaths), while a realistically pro-poor program can save 451 child lives (20.5%) and the ambitiously pro-poor program can save 542 lives (24.6%).

Conclusions

Pro-poor policies for expanding sanitation coverage have the ability to reduce population level health inequalities which can translate into reduced child diarrheal mortality.  more….

new paper: non-clinical interventions for preventable & treatable childhood diseases – what do we know?

Thu, 19Sep2013 1 comment

new paper: by  Maureen Seguin  and Miguel Niño-Zarazúa

United Nations University,

Munich Personal RePEc Archive

13. September 2013

“What do we know about non-clinical interventions for preventable and treatable childhood diseases in developing countries?”

Abstract:

Preventable and treatable childhood diseases, notably acute respiratory infections and diarrhoeal diseases are the first and second leading causes of death and morbidity among young children in developing countries. The fact that a large proportion of child deaths are caused by these diseases is symptomatic of dysfunctional policy strategies and health systems in the developing world. Though clinical interventions against such diseases have been thoroughly studied, non-clinical interventions have received much less attention. This paper contributes to the existing literature on child wellbeing in two important respects: first, it presents a theory of change-based typology that emerges from a systematic review conducted on non-clinical interventions against preventable and treatable childhood diseases. Second, it pays particular attention to policies that have been tested in a developing country context, and which focus on children as the primary target population. Overall, we find that improved water supply and quality, sanitation and hygiene, as well as the provision of medical equipment that detect symptoms of childhood diseases, along with training and education for medical workers, are effective policy instruments to tackle diarrhoeal diseases and acute respiratory infections in developing countries. more…

34 page pdf

Seguin, Maureen and Niño-Zarazúa, Miguel (2013): What do we know about non-clinical interventions for preventable and treatable childhood diseases in developing countries? Published in: WIDER Working Paper Series , Vol. 2013, No. 087 (13. September 2013)

WASHLink  from time to time likes to briefly note newly publish papers in hopes of giving  them a wider audience – let us know if you know of paper that could use this very small piece of publicity…

Environmental Enteropathy and WASH Webinar – Sept. 11

Fri, 06Sep2013 Comments off

 

Press release

Curious about the growing talk about the importance of “gut health” and its role in growth and nutrition and how better WASH practices can reduce stunting? 

Please join us for a webinar presentation and discussion on Environmental Enteropathy and WASH on Wednesday, September 11, from 11:00am – 12:30 pm Eastern Standard Time (EST), which is New York time.The very best programs focusing on nutritional intake have only solved 1/3 of the stunting problem, and no nutritional research trial has ever normalized linear growth. Adequate diet is necessary for healthy growth, but is not sufficient. Meanwhile, improved water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) is associated with decreased stunting and has the same average effect size as the very best infant feeding interventions. We now know that a condition of the child’s intestine — environmental enteropathy (EE) — is brought on by living in a dirty environment, can have a very profound impact on stunting, and can be partially reversed through WASH interventions.

Come hear the latest on these important findings about EE from Laura Smith with Cornell University and how WASH can be integrated into USAID nutrition and other programs.

This event is sponsored by the USAID WASH, Nutrition and Feed the Future Community of Practice with support from the USAID TOPS and WASHplus projects.

To Participate:

You can participate in this online event through Fuze at http://fuze.me/20908746 on the day/time of the webinar. No need to preregister. To join the audio, please choose one of two methods: 1) Internet Audio, and simply select the internet audio option after joining; or 2) Use your phone and call +1348177654. If prompted, enter the meeting number: 20908746, then press #.

If you have any questions about this event or issues using Fuze, please contact Patrick Coonan at mailto:coonanfsn@gmail.com

about:

“The WASHplus project creates supportive environments for healthy households and communities by delivering high-impact interventions in water supply, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) and indoor air pollution (IAP). WASHplus uses proven, at-scale interventions to reduce diarrheal diseases and acute respiratory infections, the two top killers of children under five years of age globally. WASHplus has expertise to integrate WASH and IAP activities into existing education, HIV/AIDS, maternal and child health, and nutrition programs. WASHplus builds strong in-country partnerships to increase impact. In addition, WASHplus is charged with exploring and promoting innovation in the WASH and IAP sectors. WASHplus is funded by the United States Agency for International Development’s Bureau for Global Health.more…

USAID: “In an interconnected world, instability anywhere around the world can impact us here at home. Working side-by-side with the military in active conflicts, USAID plays a critical role in our nation’s effort to  stabilize countries and build responsive local governance; we work on the same problems as our military using a different set of tools. We also ease the transition between conflict and long-term development by investing in agriculture, health systems and democratic institutions. And while USAID can work in active conflict, or help countries transition from violence, the most important thing we can do is prevent conflict in the first place. This is smarter, safer and less costly than sending in soldiers.

USAID extends help from the American  people to achieve results for the poorest  and most vulnerable around the world. That assistance does not represent a Democratic value or a Republican value, but an American value; as beneficiaries of peace and prosperity, Americans have a responsibility to assist those less fortunate so we see the day when our assistance is no longer necessary.” more…

Call for papers: The 2013 Water and Health Conference: Where Science Meets Policy

Wed, 06Feb2013 Comments off

The 2013 Water and Health Conference: Where Science Meets Policy will bring together experts from academia, industry, non-governmental organizations, government and foundations to provide an interdisciplinary perspective spanning science, policy, practice and economics. We are now accepting abstracts for poster and verbal presentations.

The submission deadline is April 30, and may be submitted via the conference website.

The deadline for early decision is March 15, which is intended to assist people who will need to seek visas.

2013 Main Conference Themes

  • Hygiene and behavioral change
  • M&E: local, global, and human right perspectives
  • Institutions, finance, and sustainability
  • Sanitation and health
  • Water supply and quality: from catchment to consumer and back

Abstract Submission Guidelines

  • Title: 150 characters
  • Authors: 300 characters
  • Presenter: 100 characters
  • Text: 5000 characters, including spaces

Important links for details:

More About the Conference

Bringing together academic research with policy, practice and networking events

The 2013 Water and Health Conference: Where Science Meets Policy, organized by The Water Institute at UNC, will consider drinking water supply, sanitation, hygiene and water resources in both the developing and developed worlds with a strong public health emphasis.

The 2013 Water and Health Conference: Where Science Meets Policy is accompanied by several exciting events before and after the conference. Don’t miss the opportunity to network with and learn from the unique array of national and international professionals!

 

Save the Date!

  • The 2013 Conference will run from October 14th through the 18th.

Location:

UNC image

William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

all content for this page comes from directly conference web pages

Linking the drops of knowledge to form a stream of WASH information: WATSAN, Sanitation, Water, Hygiene, and Global Health

WASH Finance

Costs and funding of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services for all

bacigalupe

Gonzalo Bacigalupe, EdD, MPH

Ross Bailey's Blog

Campaigns and digital innovations

Econosteez

Econemana

stichtingconnectinternational

www.connectinternational.nl

A Page from Tom Paulson

Global Health, Science and Journalism

recyclewater

Just another WordPress.com site

Source News Service Feedback's Blog

Focus Group Interviews to mesure spread, use and impact of IRC Services

Sustainable Sanitation in Emergency & Reconstruction

News of developments and innovations - collected by SuSanA working group 8

Peter J Bury 4 IRC

A journey into a "using a Blog for work" experience @ IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre

Medindo Água

Neste blog são sugeridos sites, textos e trabalhos técnicos sobre conservação, medição e perdas de água. Com o entendimento de que MEDIR é determinar ou avaliar a grandeza ou a quantidade de; calcular; regular; moderar; refrear; proporcionar; ponderar; analisar; ter a extensão de.

Insourced- Dr. Kate Tulenko

Thoughts on a healthier world

The Political Economy of Water Project

About water politics, economics, and other issues surrounding this vital resource.

Environmental Engineering Engenharia do Ambiente

This group aims sharing opportunities between Environmental Engineers / Este grupo tem como objectivo partilhar oportunidades entre profissionais de Engenharia do Ambiente (English / Português)

Global Health Dispatch

Diaries from the Field

%d bloggers like this: