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Posts Tagged ‘Environment’

Turning recycled wastewater into a commoditized resource : Valérie Issumo at TEDxLausanne

Sun, 03Mar2013 1 comment

The talk is titled: Wastewater, a resource or a weapon of mass destruction? 

Valérie shows us how to turn recycled wastewater into a commoditized resource, improve water sanitation, provide efficient water usage, and reduce price volatility.

….

Valérie Issumo is the CEO of Prana Sustainable Water company (http://www.pranasustainablewater.ch) . An economist, she worked for 15 years as a soft commodities trader and as a trainer in Belgium, Uruguay, Cameroon and Switzerland. Throughout her career she has fought for sustainability and risk mitigation in the entire value chain of traded goods. She is a university lecturer and also a consultant for food security, socially responsible investments, pricing ecosystems and the assessment of water interdependencies. Valérie holds an MBA, has studied at various international water centres, and was a recipient of the Prize of the Belgian Minister of Foreign Trade.

Prana Sustainable Water is acting for the following challenges:

  • Reducing the 80% untreated wastewater (UNEP) by matching offers and pre-paid demands of treated water allowing to finance sanitation and restore the public water quality as common good for not hindering growth and strategies.
  • Water is the underlying commodity of every goods or services: please check www.cdproject.net/water and www.waterfootprint.org: : Prana Sustainable Water has designed Ethical Water Titles© – futures contracts – to commoditize treated wastewater as tradable resource on the Ethical Water Exchange platform or commodities exchange for water procurement and price security.
  • Scaling-up clean technologies for wastewater:the members of Prana Sustainable Water Club active in wastewater can benefit organized markets through solvent demands of recycled water via Ethical Water Titles© allowing to leapfrog the leverage effects solving simultaneously water, health, economic, environmental and social issues.
  • Offset water consumption : wastewater can be recycled on an infinite basis. Prana Sustainable Water boosts responsible productions or services prioritizing reuse water with the automatic respect of the Water Exploitation Index growingblue.com and storing part of recycled wastewater into green water bnks© for philanthropy, reforestation and production of green/rain water, energy, public services like fires..etc…
  • Defense and food security Our motto is to incentivize responsible water use to produce:
    - what makes sense (prioritizing commoditized recycled water from wastewater for Human Rights, for water footprints of functional food or with high nutritional value and ecosystems services),
    - where it makes sense (according to the impact),
    - how it makes sense (with treated wastewater and sludge energy).

More:

Prana Sustainable Water site pages

source of materials YouTube posting & Prana Sustainable Water

 

Where we get our fresh water – Christiana Z. Peppard TED-Ed

Fri, 01Mar2013 1 comment

Very quick! synopsis of global water consumption Serves as great intro for deeper exploration of water or tangential topics.

more on TED-Ed…

Also see the following video by the two

Fresh water scarcity: An introduction to the problem  

TED-Ed

TED-Ed’s commitment to creating lessons worth sharing is an extension of TED’s mission of spreading great ideas. Within the growing TED-Ed video library, you will find carefully curated educational videos, many of which represent collaborations between talented educators and animators nominated through the TED-Ed platform. This platform also allows users to take any useful educational video, not just TED’s, and easily create a customized lesson around the video. Users can distribute the lessons, publicly or privately, and track their impact on the world, a class, or an individual student. – See more ….

Images and text from Ted-ed site

Waterless Urinals: A Resource Book

Thu, 21Feb2013 Comments off

This is a Wonderful 39 page  Technical document  on covering  all aspect  of Waterless Urinals and some variants that incorporates
the core ideas.

 waterless urinal

written by

  • Dr V M Chariar
  • S Ramesh Sakthivel

from forward

This Resource Book is a guide that seeks to assist individuals, builders, engineers, architects, and policy makers in promoting waterless urinals and the benefits of harvesting urine for reuse through waterless urinals and urine diverting toilets.

Chapters cover a wide set of Waterless Urinals details

  1. Waterless Urinals
    1. 1.1  Advantages of Waterless Urinals and Reuse of Urine
    2. 1.2  Demerits of Conventional Urinals
  2. Functioning of Waterless Urinals
    1. 2.1  Sealant Liquid Traps
    2. 2.2  Membrane Traps
    3. 2.3  Biological Blocks
    4. 2.4  Comparative Analysis of Popular Odour Traps
    5. 2.5  Other Types of odour Traps
    6. 2.6  Installation and Maintenance of Waterless Urinals
  3. Innovative Urinal Designs
    1. 3.1  Public Urinal Kiosk 21
    2. 3.2  Green Waterless Urinal
    3. 3.3  Self Constructed Urinals
  4. Urine Diverting Toilets
  5. Urine Harvesting for Agriculture
    1. 5.1  Safe Application of Urine 3
    2. 5.2  Methods of Urine Application
  6. Other Applications of Urine
  7. Challenges and the Way Forward
  8. References and Further Reading
The book has a solid collection of tables and diagrams that support the text
  • Comparative analysis of popular odour traps
  • Average chemical composition of fresh urine
  • Recommended dose of urine for various crops
  • Waterless urinals for men
  • Schematic diagram showing functioning of urinals
  • Sealant liquid based odour trap
  • Urinals with sealant liquid based odour traps
  • Flat rubber tube by Keramag and silicon membranes by Addicom
  • LDPE membrane by Shital Ceramics
  • Biological blocks
  • Formwork used for fabrication of public urinal kiosk
  • Reinforced concrete public urinal kiosk
  • Drawing of public urinal kiosk established at IIT Delhi
  • Green urinal established at IIT Delhi
  • Plant bed of green urinal with perforated pipe
  • Drawing of public urinal kiosk established at IIT Delhi
  • Self constructed urinal Eco‐lily
  • Squatting type urine diverting dry toilet with two chambers
  • Urine diverting no mix toilet 27 Sectional view of a urine diverting dry toilet
  • Deep injection of urine using soil injector
  • Deep injection of urine using perforated pet bottles
  • Use of fertilisation tank for applying urine through drip irrigation
  • Manually operated reactor for recovery of struvite
  • Schematic drawing of ammonia stripping from urine
Among many topics the Doc  weighs pros and cons of of traps to prevent odor and gases for escaping .Most of the solutions  have cost / maintenance barriers that limit feasibility to particular set of cases. India is a large county and need a variety of solutions as does the rest of the world.
We will  will  be interested to learn more about Zerodor
“An odourless trap Zerodor which does not require replaceable parts or consumables resulting in low maintenance costs has been developed at IIT Delhi. This model is in final test stage yet to be made commercially available.”    more on Zerodor
further notes from forward

Waterless Urinals do not require water for flushing and can be promoted at homes, institutions and public places to save water, energy and to harvest urine as a resource. Reduction in infrastructure required for water supply and waste water treatment is also a spinoff arising from installing waterless urinals. The concept, founded on the principles of ecological sanitation helps in preventing environmental damage caused by conventional flush sanitation systems.

In recent years, Human Urine has been identified as a potential resource that can be beneficially used for agriculture and industrial purposes. Human urine contains significant portion of essential plant nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphate and potassium excreted by human beings. Urine and faeces can also be separated employing systems such as urine diverting toilets. In the light of diminishing world’s phosphate and oil reserves which determine availability as well as pricing of mineral fertilisers, harvesting urine for reuse in agriculture assumes significant importance. Akin to the movement for harvesting rain water, urine harvesting is a concept which could have huge implications for resource conservation.

Link to download  book & A deeper overview:

with excerpts can be found on the the India Water Portal site  more….

Prepared By

Stanford Nitrogen Group – Energy from Waste Nitrogen – Wastewater Treatment research

Mon, 28Jan2013 Comments off

 When looking at sanitation/wastewater treatment and making it economically feasible for more parts of the world, this is very interesting research.   Some will say it has roots in the fact that there is “gold”  in out crap…

Related links to this research:

Wastewater as a Clean Energy Source:

  …On May 1, a panel of judges awarded the $100,000 National University Clean Energy Business Challenge prize to the Stanford team for its project to convert nitrogen waste into nitrous oxide that is then used for clean power generation….

Paper: Nitrogen removal with energy recovery through N2O decomposition:

by Yaniv D. Scherson ,  George F. Wells ,  Sung-Geun Woo ,  Jangho Lee ,  Joonhong Park ,  Brian J. Cantwell and Craig S. Criddle

A new process for the removal of nitrogen from wastewater is introduced. The process involves three steps: (1) partial nitrification of NH4+ to NO2; (2) partial anoxic reduction of NO2 to N2O; and (3) N2O conversion to N2 with energy recovery by either catalytic decomposition to N2 and O2 or use of N2O to oxidize biogas CH4. Steps 1 and 3 have been previously established at full-scale. Accordingly, bench-scale experiments focused on step 2. Two strategies were evaluated and found to be effective: in the first, Fe(II) was used to abiotically reduce NO2 to N2O; in the second, COD stored as polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) was used as the electron donor for partial heterotrophic reduction of NO2 to N2O. ….

Researchers use rocket science for sustainable waste treatment process

Normally, we want to discourage these gases from forming,” said Craig Criddle, a professor of civil and environmental engineering and senior fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment at Stanford. “But by encouraging the formation of nitrous oxide, we can remove harmful nitrogen from the water and simultaneously increase methane production for use as fuel.

1st International IWA Conference on Holistic Sludge Management

Fri, 25Jan2013 2 comments

An IWA specialist conference

iwa-logo

6-8 May 2013
Västerås, Sweden

Websites: http://www.hsm2013.se/  and http://www.iwahq.org/1qh/events/iwa-events/2013/4.html

The purpose of this conference is to provide a forum for researchers and practitioners to exchange the latest developments in sludge management.It will give possibilities to examine and discuss the different challenges connected to resource recovery through treatment and disposal of wastewater sludge.

The conference covers sludge management and anaerobic digestion with a broad holistic system perspective. It includes the recycling of nutrients such as phosphorus and nitrogen by focusing on upstream treatment to reduce harmful substances in wastewater, as well as on the production of biogas as a fuel for vehicles. The certification of treated sludge is another important condition for the possibilities to recycle sludge to farmland areas.

Conference  also want to share knowledge, practices and ideas for the future directions of process development. The sludge treatment is one of the key issues to be solved. The aim of the conference is to take a major step forward to where all aspects of sludge management are addressed.

Proposed Themes:

  • Production and utilization of biogas
  • Nutrient recovery processes
  • Processes for hygienization of sludge
  • The need for a holistic approach including i.e. environmental effects from sludge handling/management in the total performance efficiency of wastewater treatment
  • Use of sludge for energy generation including combustion and supercritical gasification
  • Emerging contaminants in sludge – upstream separation and optimization to decrease negative effects by detoxification
  • Physical and chemical pre-treatment processes, including chemical conditioning, thickening, dewatering, drying
  • Modelling of anaerobic processes
  • Methane emission from sludge treatment

Contact:
Erik Dahlquist at erik.dahlquist@mdh.se and Tel. +46-21-151768
Conference Programme Committee Chairman
Monica Odlare at monica.odlare@mdh.se and Tel. +46-21-101611
Conference Programme Committee Secretary

IWA- the global network for water professionals

The International Water Association is a global reference point for water professionals, spanning the continuum between research and practice and covering all facets of the water cycle. Through its network of members and experts in research, practice, regulation, industry, consulting and manufacturing, IWA is in a better position than any other organisation to help water professionals create innovative, pragmatic and sustainable solutions to challenging global needs.

The strength of IWA lies in the professional and geographic diversity of its membership — a global mosaic of national, corporate and individual member communities. Our members are leaders in their field and represent:

  • Researchers – where solutions begin
  • Utilities – managing water services worldwide
  • Consultants – connecting problem owners with solution providers
  • Industry – creating sustainable water solutions
  • Regulators – safeguarding public health
  • Equipment manufacturers – translating ideas into products

The IWA network is structured to promote multi-level collaboration among its diverse membership groups, and to share the benefit of knowledge on water science and management worldwide. The Association helps make the right connections at the right time, thereby sharing cutting-edge research and practice that allows the water sector shape its future.

Links to other great IWA events

all content for this post  comes from the  IWA sites

“Sewage Fed Biorefineries A Foundation for Urban Sustainability”

Fri, 05Oct2012 3 comments

This a great TEDX by Kartik Chandran at TEDxColumbiaEngineering

Redefining the model for urban sewage treatment / sanitation  addressing

Waste recover-  Key Chemicals

Energy Recovery

Sustainability

From the Youtube Site

“Kartik Chandran is an Environmental Engineer. He is currently Associate Professor of Earth and Environmental Engineering at Columbia University, where he leads the Columbia University Biomolecular Environmental Science program and the Wastewater Treatment and Climate Change program. Under his stewardship, the research directions of biological wastewater treatment and biological nitrogen removal were established for the first time ever in the history of Columbia University. Chandran is keenly interested in developing novel models for sustainable sanitation and wastewater treatment, with a specific focus on managing the global nitrogen cycle (one of the grand challenges of the National Academy of Engineering) and linking it to the carbon cycle, the water cycle and the energy cycle. Chandran has received, among other awards, the NSF CAREER award and the Paul Busch Award. He was the recipient of a 2007 National Academies of Science Fellowship and a guest professorship at the Delft University of Technology. In 2011, Chandran began implementing a novel model for sanitation in Africa, supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. He also serves on the Board of Trustees of the Water Environment Federation.”

Great Site: PLoS Medicine with great articles this month on Climate/ Heath / Ethics

Fri, 29Jun2012 Comments off

PLOS MEDICINE

 

PLoS Medicine is a   open-access medical journal – something we need to support if we are to make progress  on improving Global Health!

This month it  has two great articles  (among  many others) worth taking a look at.

 

 

Why Human Health and Health Ethics Must Be Central to Climate Change Deliberations

by Jerome Amir Singh

An overview:

(taken directly from site)

  • The human health implications of climate change must be afforded greater prominence.
  • Governments, the private sector, financiers, and society have a moral responsibility to practice socially responsible investment and to mitigate against the impact of climate change, particularly in relation to human health.
  • Human health must be a core, not peripheral, focus in future climate change deliberations.
  • The health community, led by health ministers, must play a central role in climate change deliberations.
  • Health ethics principles must be afforded equal status to economics principles in climate change deliberations.

Connecting the Global Climate Change and Public Health Agendas

by Maria Nilsson, Birgitta Evengård, Rainer Sauerborn

An overview

(taken directly from site)

  • Climate change is a public health problem. Evidence from many sectors shows substantial health impacts of climate change, particularly for the most vulnerable: the poorest, the youngest, and the oldest.
  • Human health and climate change are closely connected. Within the global United Nations (UN) process, health is seen as the most direct component linking climate change and individual lives.
  • Public health actions in relation to climate change are needed. Top-down advocacy on health and climate at the UN level needs to be mirrored by bottom-up public health actions that bring health and climate co-benefits.

About PLoS Medicine

The Case for Open Access (OA)

PLoS Medicine is the leading open-access medical journal, providing an innovative and influential venue for research and comment on the major challenges to human he

alth worldwide. We specifically seek to publish papers which have relevance across a range of settings and that address the major environmental, social, and political determinants of health, as well as the biological.”

SuSanA Releases Compilation of 13 factsheets on key sustainable sanitation topics

Thu, 10May2012 Comments off

From SuSanA web page:

FACTSHEETS

  1. Capacity development for sustainable sanitation
  2. Financial and economic analysis
  3. Links between sanitation, climate change and renewable energies
  4. Sanitation systems and technology options
  5. Productive sanitation and the link to food security
  6. Planning of sustainable sanitation for cities
  7. Sustainable sanitation for schools
  8. Integrating a gender perspective in sustainable sanitation
  9. Sustainable sanitation for emergencies and reconstruction situations
  10. Sanitation as a business
  11. Public awareness raising and sanitation marketing
  12. Operation and maintenance of sustainable sanitation systems
  13. Sustainable sanitation and groundwater protection

The  document is available as a single 116 page  pdf   or  two pdfs breaking the dock in half.  

It is filled with hot links to a wealth of reference material. This alone will make the document invaluable. All urls are written out so links retain their value in a paper copy.

The list of contributors is is huge. A nice thing is the main authors  provide hot email links  at the end of each of the 13 sections so you can easily contact them. 

The  only problem with such a beautiful document is there is no traditional table of contents or index.  

Image

Executive summary from  the pdf

“The target audience for this document includes a wide range of readers who are interested in aspects of sustainable sanitation and their links with other environmental and development topics. Possible readers include practitioners, programme managers, engineers, students, researchers, lecturers, journalists, local government staff members, policy makers and their advisers or entrepreneurs. The emphasis of this document is on developing countries and countries in transition.

The Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) is a loose, informal network of organisations such as NGOs, private companies, governmental and research institutions as well as multilateral organisations that aim to contribute towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by promoting sustainable sanitation.

Sanitation generally refers to the provision of facilities and services for the safe disposal of human excreta and domestic wastewater. Personal hygiene practices like hand washing with soap are also part of sanitation. Sanitation also includes solid waste management and drainage but these two aspects are not the focus of this publication. In order for a sanitation system to be sustainable, it has to be economically viable, socially acceptable, technically and institutionally appropriate, and protect the environment and natural resources.

SuSanA contributes to the policy dialogue towards sustainable sanitation through its resource materials and a lively debate amongst the members during meetings, in the working groups, bilaterally, through joint publications and via various communication tools like the open online discussion forum. This publication showcases the broad knowledge base and state of discussions on relevant topics of sustainable
sanitation. All of the working groups have published one or two factsheets providing a broad guidance relating to their specific thematic area.

The 11 working groups of SuSanA have the following titles:
WG 1 Capacity development
WG 2 Finance and economics
WG 3 Renewable energies and climate change
WG 4 Sanitation systems, technology, hygiene and health
WG 5 Food security and productive sanitation systems
WG 6 Sustainable sanitation for cities and planning
WG 7 Community, rural and schools (with gender and social aspects)
WG 8 Emergency and reconstruction situations
WG 9 Sanitation as a business and public awareness
WG 10 Operation and maintenance
WG 11 Groundwater protection

Due to the inter-relationships between the working groups, the factsheets are inter-related and where appropriate, are cross-referenced. The factsheets relate to different parts of the “sanitation chain”, which consists of user interface, conveyance, collection/storage, treatment, reuse or disposal. We have attempted to visualise the linkages between the different working groups and the sanitation chain in the following schematic. There are some working groups which are dealing with overarching themes and these have been placed inthe centre of the schematic.”

Publisher:

Linking the drops of knowledge to form a stream of WASH information: WATSAN, Sanitation, Water, Hygiene, and Global Health

WASH Finance

Costs and funding of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services for all

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Neste blog são sugeridos sites, textos e trabalhos técnicos sobre conservação, medição e perdas de água. Com o entendimento de que MEDIR é determinar ou avaliar a grandeza ou a quantidade de; calcular; regular; moderar; refrear; proporcionar; ponderar; analisar; ter a extensão de.

Insourced- Dr. Kate Tulenko

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About water politics, economics, and other issues surrounding this vital resource.

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This group aims sharing opportunities between Environmental Engineers / Este grupo tem como objectivo partilhar oportunidades entre profissionais de Engenharia do Ambiente (English / Português)

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