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Faecal Sludge Management Conference FSM2

Thu, 27Sep2012 Comments off

International Convention Centre (ICC) Durban 29-31 October 2012

The second conference on developments in Faecal Sludge Management

The second conference on developments in Faecal Sludge Management is just around the corner in Durban. We are pleased to share with you the conference themes and to highlight a number of our keynote speakers and paper submissions.

Programme

The excellent response to the call for papers has resulted in a programme featuring speakers from around the globe, confirming that there is much experience and knowledge to be shared in this critical area. The second international Faecal Sludge Management conference will include presentations that fall into the following themes:

  • On-site Sanitation as a Business
  • Socio-political Aspects of On-site Sanitation
  • Toilet Design for FSM Optimisation
  • Pit Emptying – What are the Options?
  • The How of Faecal Sludge Treatment
  • Waste Not Want Not – Beneficial Use of Faecal Sludges Technology and Innovation
  • Health Aspects of Faecal Sludges

FSM2 will pick up where FSM 1 (held in Durban in March 2011) left off – with a commitment to capturing and sharing developments in the management and beneficiation of faecal sludges (including urine). This year the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) has committed to showcase and present developments in up to 40 of their Sanitation Grand Challenge Projects. For more information on FSM 1 see “What happens when the pit is full?” at http://www.afrisan.org

Presenters

Presenters at FSM2 will share experiences from countries around the world including Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Chile, Ethiopia, Ghana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Malawi, Madagascar, Mozambique, Nepal, Sweden, South Africa, the USA, the United Kingdom, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The line-up of keynote speakers includes:

Dr Doulaye Koné – Senior Programme Officer, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

The BMGF has committed over $200Million over the next few years to research and advocacy in this field which it has identified as a major area for impacting health in the developing world.

Dr Linda Strande – Programme Leader of Excreta and Wastewater Management, Eawag/Sandec

FSM research overview of Sandec (Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries). EAWAG (The Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology) is a leader in the FSM field, and manages research projects around the world. The organisation is currently compiling a book on the subject of Faecal Sludge Management.

Steve Sugden – Research Manager, Water for People and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
will look at Sanitation as a Business, drawing on his experiences with the development and transfer of the Gulper technology into commercial businesses – giving valuable insight into the process of taking a technology from concept into the marketplace.

Pam Elardo, Director of the Wastewater Treatment Division in the Department of Natural Resources and Parks, Seattle, Washington Evolution of a regional wastewater management system: matching decisions to capacity

There will 9 presentations in plenary sessions, 90 presentations in parallel sessions and a closing panel discussion. The speakers and the topics cover a wide range of interest and represent work from all over the globe. The detailed draft programme for the conference can be downloaded from www.pid.co.za .

For more information contact the FSM2 secretariat :

Bobbie Louton on Tel +27 33 342 3012 or email: fsm2@pid.co.za

all content above take from pdf: http://www.pid.co.za/images/stories/1fsm2_durban_third_announcement.pdf found on FSM Conference page part of

Partners in Development (Pty) Ltd (PID) site.   A site worth looking at even if you don’t go to the conference

Bill Gates Names Winners of the Reinvent the Toilet Challenge

Wed, 15Aug2012 Comments off

Loughbourough Portotype

Loughbourough Portotype (Photo credit: Gates Foundation)

Bill Gates with a researcher from California I...

Bill Gates with a researcher from California Institute of Technology at the Reinvent the Toilet Fair in Seattle on August 14, 2012. (Photo credit: Gates Foundation)

Bill Gates with a researcher from the Universi...

Bill Gates with a researcher from the University of Toronto at the Reinvent the Toilet Fair (Photo credit: Gates Foundation)

“Next-generation” toilets showcased at Gates Foundation offer innovative sanitation solutions that can save and improve lives around the world

SEATTLE, (August 14, 2012) /PRNewswire/ — Bill Gates today announced the winners of the Reinvent the Toilet Challenge—an effort to develop “next-generation” toilets that will deliver safe and sustainable sanitation to the 2.5 billion people worldwide who don’t have it. The awards recognize researchers from leading universities who are developing innovative ways to manage human waste, which will help improve the health and lives of people around the world.

California Institute of Technology in the United States received the $100,000 first prize for designing a solar-powered toilet that generates hydrogen and electricity. Loughborough University in the United Kingdom won the $60,000 second place prize for a toilet that produces biological charcoal, minerals, and clean water. University of Toronto in Canada won the third place prize of $40,000 for a toilet that sanitizes feces and urine and recovers resources and clean water. Special recognition and $40,000 went to Eawag (Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology) and EOOS for their outstanding design of a toilet user interface.

One year ago, the foundation issued a challenge to universities to design toilets that can capture and process human waste without piped water, sewer or electrical connections, and transform human waste into useful resources, such as energy and water, at an affordable price.

The first, second, and third place winning prototypes were recognized for most closely matching the criteria presented in the Reinvent the Toilet Challenge.

Teams are showcasing their prototypes and projects at a two-day event held at the foundation’s headquarters in Seattle on August 14 and 15. The Reinvent the Toilet Fair is bringing together participants from 29 countries, including researchers, designers, investors, advocates, and representatives of the communities who will ultimately adopt these new inventions.

“Innovative solutions change people’s lives for the better,” said foundation Co-chair Bill Gates. “If we apply creative thinking to everyday challenges, such as dealing with human waste, we can fix some of the world’s toughest problems.”

Unsafe methods to capture and treat human waste result in serious health problems and death. Food and water tainted with fecal matter result in 1.5 million child deaths every year. Most of these deaths could be prevented with the introduction of proper sanitation, along with safe drinking water and improved hygiene.

Improving access to sanitation can also bring substantial economic benefits. According to the World Health Organization, improved sanitation delivers up to $9 in social and economic benefits for every $1 invested because it increases productivity, reduces healthcare costs, and prevents illness, disability, and early death.

Other projects featured at the fair include better ways to empty latrines, user-centered designs for public toilet facilities, and insect-based latrines that decompose feces faster.

“Imagine what’s possible if we continue to collaborate, stimulate new investment in this sector, and apply our ingenuity in the years ahead,” said Gates. “Many of these innovations will not only revolutionize sanitation in the developing world, but also help transform our dependence on traditional flush toilets in wealthy nations.”

Gates added: “All the participants are united by a common desire to create a better world – a world where no child dies needlessly from a lack of safe sanitation and where all people can live healthy, dignified lives.”

The Water, Sanitation & Hygiene (WSH) initiative is part of the foundation’s Global Development Program, which addresses issues such as agricultural development and financial services—problems that affect the world’s poorest people but do not receive adequate attention. WSH has committed more than $370 million to this area, with a focus on developing sustainable sanitation services that work for everyone, including the poor.

The foundation also announced a second round of Reinvent the Toilet Challenge grants totaling nearly $3.4 million. The grants were awarded to: Cranfield University (United Kingdom); Eram Scientific Solutions Private Limited (India); Research Triangle Institute (United States); and the University of Colorado Boulder (United States).

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Editor’s Notes:

Reinvent the Toilet Challenge Round 2 Winners

Cranfield University
This nearly $810,000 grant will help develop a prototype toilet that removes water from human waste and vaporizes it using a hand-operated vacuum pump and a unique membrane system. The remaining solids are turned into fuel that can also be used as fertilizer. The water vapor is condensed and can be used for washing, or irrigation.
Contact: Fiona Siebrits/ +44 (0) 1234 758040 / f.c.siebrits@cranfield.ac.uk

Eram Scientific Solutions Private Limited
A grant of more than $450,000 will make public toilets more accessible to the urban poor via the eco-friendly and hygienic “eToilet.”
Contact: Miss Ria John / +0471 4062125 / riajohn@eramscientific.com

Research Triangle Institute
This $1.3 million grant will fund the development of a self-contained toilet system that disinfects liquid waste and turns solid waste into fuel or electricity through a revolutionary new biomass energy conversion unit.
Contact: Lisa Bistreich-Wolfe / +1 919.316.3596 / lbistreich@rti.org

Universcity of Colorado Boulder
A nearly $780,000 grant will help develop a solar toilet that uses concentrated sunlight, directed and focused with a solar dish and concentrator, to disinfect liquid-solid waste and produce biological charcoal (biochar) that can be used as a replacement for wood charcoal or chemical fertilizers.
Contact: Karl Linden / +1 303 302 0188/ Carol Rowe / +1 303 492 7426 / Carol.Rowe@colorado.edu

For photos, b-roll, and additional information, please visit our Newsmarket site.

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Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Guided by the belief that every life has equal value, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation works to help all people lead healthy, productive lives. In developing countries, it focuses on improving people’s health with vaccines and other lifesaving tools and giving them the chance to lift themselves out of hunger and extreme poverty. In the United States, it seeks to significantly improve education so that all young people have the opportunity to reach their full potential. Based in Seattle, Washington, the foundation is led by CEO Jeff Raikes and Co-chair William H. Gates Sr., under the direction of Bill and Melinda Gates and Warren Buffett. To learn more, visit www.gatesfoundation.org. You can also join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter, and our blog www.impatientoptimists.org.

 

Related Documents

Background: Reinvent the Toilet
Reinvent the Toilet Fair Program
Exhibitor Technology Guide: Reinvent the Toilet Fair 2012

Related Links

NewsMarket
Water, Sanitation, Hygiene Strategy Overview
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Impatient Optimists

press release Translations

French
German

source of all materials http://www.multivu.com/mnr/49395-bill-gates-names-winners-of-the-reinvent-the-toilet-challenge

 

 

The Bill &Melinda Gates Foundation supports joint project by Swiss aquatic research institute and South African water utility

Fri, 15Oct2010 2 comments

Urine as a Commercial Fertilizer?

14 October 2010 – press release reprint
http://www.eawag.ch/medien/bulletin/20101014/index_EN

In Eawag’s laboratory, process engineer Kai Udert carries out research on various reactors to separate nutrients and contaminants out of urine

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation supports joint project by Swiss aquatic research institute and South African water utility

The separate collection of urine provides innovative opportunities for the improvement of sanitation and the recycling of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. Urine separation is an excellent sanitation solution, particularly in places where classic sewer-based sanitation is not sustainable. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is providing a grant of 3.0 million US dollars to support a joint project by the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (Eawag) and the eThekwini Water and Sanitation utility (EWS) in South Africa to continue developing practical, community-scale nutrient recovery systems.

The project, covering a period of four years, focuses on the further development of technical solutions for urine processing for nutrient recovery. In addition, project participants, together with experts from the University of KwaZulu-Natal and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich, will study the logistics of collection and transport of urine from toilets to processing facilities. The Swiss aquatic research scientists and their partners in South Africa will also examine ways in which sanitation can be paid for by the production and sale of urine-based fertiliser, thus enabling a cheap, efficient and widely-accepted sanitation system to be set up.

Alternatives are urgently needed

There is a growing awareness that in many parts of the world an alternative is needed for the conventional sewer-based sanitation and central wastewater treatment system – if only for the reason that not enough water is available for drinking, let alone to be used for flushing. There is a pressing need to reduce the number of people with no access to basic sanitary facilities and safe drinking water, as required by the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). As well as endangering people’s health, inadequate disposal of faecal material poses a risk to the drinking water supply and contaminates the natural environment. Last but not least, the global demand for fertiliser is so great that interest in local sources of nutrients is growing.

Successful preparatory work in Nepal

Eawag has many years of experience in the research of urine separation, also known as NoMix technology, and in 2007 completed the transdisciplinary Novaquatis project. Since then, Eawag’s project in Siddhipur near Kathmandu, Nepal, has demonstrated that urine processed to make the phosphorus-based fertiliser struvite can help to close regional nutrient cycles and promote awareness of the value of the nutrients contained in urine. Farmers participating in the scheme also benefit since they do not need to buy as much imported chemical fertiliser (www.eawag.ch/stun). «This experience plus the collaboration with an extremely progressive administrative department in Durban were important reasons for developing our project in South Africa for the next four years», says process engineer Kai Udert, who is the Eawag researcher in charge of the South Africa project.

Collaboration with an innovative water authority

Eawag can count on a forward-looking partner in the South African eThekwini region around Durban, since they have already carried out important pioneering work in the field of sanitation. EWS has been promoting urine-diverting dry toilets since 2002 and there are already around 90,000 such toilets in use. However, urine is simply soaked into the ground, which could create new problems in the longer term. A simple, combined system for nutrient recycling from urine will be developed . This will reduce the costs of sanitation, prevent pollution of water resources and produce fertiliser for the local market. «That’s a completely new way of thinking and not just a small step on an already well-trodden path», says Kai Udert.

More information: Dr. Kai Udert, Telephone +41 44 823 5360

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