Archive

Archive for the ‘dry’ Category

new study: Social Factors Impacting Use of EcoSan in Rural Indonesia

Mon, 27Sep2010 1 comment

The  Social Factors Impacting Use of EcoSan in Rural Indonesia report came out in June 2010.

The Study Starts of stating the fact that “Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) 2010 data indicate that around 38% of the rural population has access to improved sanitation services and that open defecation remains a widespread practice for over 60 million Indonesians. “

With  a majority of Indonesia being  Muslims the study include a a look at Muslim teaching on the subject of sanitation.  “The study objective was to identify the social, religious, cultural and gender-related factors  which influence rural people’s attitudes towards urine and excreta-based fertilizers in general and the EcoSan urine diversion system in particular.  It doe not pretend to be anything but a modest study: ” the study does not seek to be a comprehensive reflection of the whole of Indonesia. Instead, it provides a preliminary assessment of attitudes towards EcoSan, and identifi es some key drivers and inhibitors…” It survey 350 people in 5 out of 33 provinces included Muslims, Christians and respondents with traditional
beliefs. Four producers and retailers of excreta and urine based fertilizer were also identifi ed and interviewed.

One of the key finding  come in this paragraph:

“The study data show that this is not only a Muslim religious objection,
but that Christians also consider it difficult to keep the excreta dry by not
using water above the disposal hole. While the percentage of Muslims who
considered it difficult to keep the disposal hole dry was fairly constant, the
percentage of Christians who felt this way varied from 35% in Kulon Progo,
Central Java to 78% in East Sumba. This confirms the assumption that
use of water for cleansing, where available, is also an Indonesian cultural
behavior that inhibits the use of a toilet system requiring dry storage. “

The study reports  the researchers’  findings that  more than “…80% of the respondents are willing to use urine or feces-based fertilizer.” The report goes on to say  a similar number are willing to consume products from  the fields using compost based fertilizer.  The hard part,  the study  states,  is only 50% of the people surveyed are will to to be involved in processing  the urine and feces to make the compost.  (I would like to know how this  compares to other locations around the world 50%  Seems high-  a positive rather than negative –  )

The study goes on to look at the roles/ potential roles  men and women of a family unit have on

  • selecting fertilizer for crops, and for selection installing,toilets for the family.
  • selecting toilets  installing them  and composting waste from them.

The conclusions are complex.  Hopefully organizations that want to just plop down ecosan units all  anywhere in the will carefully read this  short but informative report in its entirety. We must truly understand  the people, if  we / they are to have success  with  ecosan or any other viable alternative!

Report Sections

INTRODUCTION: ECOSAN IN INDONESIA
  • Background
  • Objective of the Study
  • Consideration of EcoSan as a Sanitation Option
  • Methodology
DEMAND FOR ORGANIC FERTILIZER EXISTS  ACROSS RELIGIONS AND REGIONS
  • Excreta-based fertilizers are still a sensitive issue for some
RESERVATIONS ABOUT USING ECOSAN TOILETS
  • Gender Differences
IS HUMAN EXCRETA-BASED FERTILIZER NAJIS?
CONCLUSIONS

Publishing Agency:

The Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) “…a multi-donor partnership administered by the World Bank to support poor people in obtaining affordable, safe and sustainable access to water and sanitation services.”

Editors/Authors/ Researchers:

The research was carried out by Entin Sriani Muslim assisted by Ana Nurhasanah in 2009. This learning
note was co-authored by Martin Albrecht, Isabel Blackett, and Ikabul Arianto and peer reviewed by
Eduardo Perez and Jeremy Colin.

Document type Pdf  with search-able  / selectable text. 4 pages  Includes images and graphs

Ecosan /”ecological sanitation” posters published on slideshare

Wed, 30Dec2009 Comments off

DRY TOILET 2009 Conference proceedings and presentations

Sun, 27Dec2009 Comments off

The proceedings from the DRY TOILET 2009 conference held by Global Dry Toilet Association of Finland are  available   They are  a great resource and available at  http://huussi.net/tapahtumat/DT2009/full.html

The summary  is also avaliable in  – suomi (Finish) and Russian as a pdf

The Suomi version of the  home page is http://www.huussi.net/

Session Presentations

&
Country Focus

1 PROMOTING ECOLOGICAL SANITATION IN ORDER TO
ACHIEVE MDG’S
  • “Composting Toilet – The Bangalore, India experience”
  • Sustainable sanitation in Namibia’s lowest income urban
    areas: “The potential of composting toilets”
  • “To dry or not to dry?-People matter in scaling up dry
    sanitation”
  • “Dry Toilets in Tajikistan”
  • “Sustainable sanitation beyond Taps & Toilet”
  • “Prevalence of Ecological sanitation uptake and associated
    factors in Kabale municipality, Uganda”
India,
Namibia, Finland, Tajikistan, Nepal, Uganda
2 HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS RELATED TO DRY
SANITATION
  • “Toilets and health throughout history”
  • “The public health safety of using human excreta from urine
    diverting toilets for agriculture: The Philippine experience”
  • “Dry Toilet – A boon to rural community”
  • “Ecological sanitation: inactivation of pathogens in faeces
    from dry toilet – grey water disposal”
  • “From pit latrine to a safe and sustainable toilet.”
  • “Possible public health implication of excreta re-use in
    poorly sanitated rural farming communities of Ebonyi state, South-East
    Nigeria”
Philippines, India, Argentina, Belarus, Nigeria
3 IMPLEMENTING ECOLOGICAL SANITATION IN
EMERGENCIES
  • “Sanitation in the disaster cycle – immediate response,
    preparedness and risk reduction”
  • “Provision of Dry Toilets in earthquake hit areas of
    Pakistan – learning from first hand experience”
  • “Eco-toilet for disaster preparedness”
  • “Introducing ecological sanitation in emergency: Some
    lessons learned from a pilot project Bangladesh”
  • “Sanitation in IDP and refugee camps in Chad: the current
    and future challenges”
Pakistan,
Bangladesh, Chad
4a PROSPECTS AND CHALLENGES IN RE-USE OF EXCRETA
  • “Pathogens of concern for developing countries and risk of
    reusing ecosan sludge in agriculture”
  • “Urine from separating toilets for non-edible plants”
  • “From pit latrine to nutrient conservation”
  • “Re-use of human’s urine in market-gardening in
    South-Benin: financial returns analysis”
  • “Biogas generation – a multi-dimensional development
    approach”
Mexico,
Benin, Ethiopia
4b PROSPECTS AND CHALLENGES IN RE-USE OF
EXCRETA continues
  • “Dry toilet compost and separated urine as fertilisers for
    cabbage and potato – a case study from Finland “
  • “Prospects and Challenges in the reuse of human excreta in
    Nakuru Municipality, Kenya”
  • “Use of Faecal Sludge for Agriculture in Tamale Metropolis:
    perception of Farmers, Consumers and Relevant Agencies”
  • “Positive spin offs using mobile urinals and UD toilets in
    Burkina Faso”
  • “Study on the compost produced by compost bins and ecosan
    latrines and survey on knowledge attitudes and practices in usage of
    compost bins and ecosan latrines”
Finland,
Kenya, Ghana, Burkina Faso,

Sri Lanka

5 CHALLENGES IN IMPLEMENTING ECOLOGICAL
SANITATION
  • “Evaluation of social and cultural acceptance of the
    biotoilet system”
  • “Social representattions of hygiene and excretes disposal -
    The case of ecological dry toilets introduction in Quibdo and
    Tumaco-Columbia”
  • “Towards a common goal. The challenges of the sanitation
    sector in Zambia”
  • “Living with the marginalised: Addressing the
    socio-economic and cultural aspects in implementing Oka-Dry Toilets in
    Madimba; case of Lusaka”
  • Sari Huuhtanen*, Finland; Michelo Katambo, Zambia:
  • “The challenge of social change; experiences from Zambia
    dry-sanitation project (ZASP, 2006-2008)”
Mexico,
Columbia, Zambia
6 GENDER ASPECTS
RELATED TO DRY SANITATION
  • “Gender aspects of ecological sanitation with urine
    diverting dry toilets”
  • “Female local latrine builders: Contributing towards
    objectives of International Year of Sanitation, 2008″
  • “Women and ecological sanitation”
  • “Promotion of dry toilets for reducing vulnerability for
    the poor women having Islamic and cultural values in urban slums of
    Bangladesh”
Nepal,
Uganda, Bangladesh
7a TECHNICAL
DEVELOPMENT OF DRY TOILETS
  • “Is the
    Agricultural utilisation of Treated Urine and Faces recommendable?”
  • “Developing low cost composting toilet for developing
    countries”
  • “Solar thermal sanitation of human faeces – an affordable
    solution for
    ensuring sustainability of EcoSan activities”
  • “Feasibility assessment of application of onsite volume
    reduction
    system (OVRS) for source-separated urine”
  • “Urban slum dwellers in Kenya and Bangladesh benefit from
    using Peepoo
    bags which are self-sanitising and biodegradable”
Kenya and
Bangladesh and others
7b TECHICAL
DEVELOPMENT OF DRY TOILETS continues
  • “From the outhouse to indoor dry toilets in Finland”
  • “Estimation of water evaporation rate from composting
    toilet”
  • “Implementation of urine-diverting dry toilets in
    multi-storey apartment buildings in Ethiopia”
  • Dry sanitation in multi-story apartment buildings: “The
    case of Dongsheng, Inner Mongolia, China”
  • “The humanure toilet”
Finland,
Ethiopia, Inner Mongolia, China
8 CAPACITY
BUILDING
  • “Going to scale with urine diversion in Sweden – From
    individual households to municipal systems in 15 years”
  • “The processes of adaption during the introducing urine
    diverting toilets in Kyrgyzstan”
  • “Influence of social, cultural, economic and gender aspects
    in dry toilet as eco-sanitation tool. Case study of Sukuma-nomadic
    community in Malinyi, Tanzania.”
  • “Experiences with ecosan systems to provide sustainable
    sanitation for schools in Kenya and India”
  • “Gold Factory – An experimental art project with dry
    toilets”
Sweden,
Kyrgyzstan, Tanzania,Kenya, India
Side event SUSTAINABLE
SANITATION FOR TOURISM AND RECREATION
  • “Toilet provision in the Cairngorms national park,
    Scotland, UK”
  • “Experience of biotoilet installations on Kizhi island,
    Republic of Karelia, Russia”
  • “Promotion of sustainable development of rural communities
    around especially protected natural areas in Kazakhstan”
  • “Public toilets and care practices in nature parks in
    Finland, current situation and recommendations for improvement”
Scotland,
Republic of Karelia, Russia, Kazakhstan, Finland

Ecosan toilet – video primer on design and use

Fri, 28Aug2009 Comments off

This is a great introduction to use and building/design of an ecosan dry/composting toilet

wildsingapore news: To save lives, an Indian doctor rethinks the toilet

Sun, 23Aug2009 Comments off

To save lives, an Indian doctor rethinks the toilet

Sebastien Buffet Yahoo News 23 Aug 09;

STOCKHOLM (AFP) – By rethinking the humble toilet, Indian sanitation expert Bindeshwar Pathak has found a way that can save water — and lives — in developing countries.

For four decades, His Sulabh Sanitation Movement has equipped more than 1.2 million households with eco-friendly toilets and installed 7,500 public lavatories across India.

Yet almost three out of four Indians, or around 700 million people, still have no access to basic sanitation.

This leads to up to half a million deaths each year, Pathak, 66, told AFP at the World Water Week conference in Stockholm, where he was awarded this year’s Stockholm Water Prize for his groundbreaking work.

To lower the risk to human health, Pathak developed a twin-pit, pour-flush toilet known as the Sulabh, that uses a pair of tanks to store waste matter with no smell or soil pollution, pending recycling as fertiliser.

It uses significantly less water than a standard toilet, Pathak said.

“It requires only 1.0 to 1.5 liters to flush instead of 10 liters,” he said. “It saves trillions of litres of water each year.”

The idea is to discourage both open-air defecation and the use of bucket toilets — options that ramp up the risk of the spread of disease and diarrhoea.

“People have died of cholera cleaning the bucket toilets,” Pathak explained.

When a Sulabh is sold to households, its price is adjusted according to a family’s ability to pay. The poorest families pay 15 dollars (10 euros) whereas richer families can be asked to pay up to 1,000 dollars.

The Sulabh Sanitation Movement’s campaign to raise awareness of health issues has also seen more and more Indians prepared to pay user charges for its 7,500 public toilets.

Staffed 24 hours a day, they cost one dollar a month to use them by subscription — with an exemption for slum dwellers, women and children.

“For the whole month, you can go to the toilet, you can have a bath, you can drink water,” Pathak said.

The Sulabh has been exported to Afghanistan and Bhutan, and there are also plans to ship some to 15 other countries, most of them in Africa.

“I feel very happy because what we have been doing for the last 40 years, now it feels that we are going in the right direction,” Pathak told AFP.

As the winner of the Stockholm Water Prize, Pathak receives a cheque for 150,000 dollars (104,700 euros) in recognition of his work to conserve water and improve public health.

via wildsingapore news: To save lives, an Indian doctor rethinks the toilet.

Linking the drops of knowledge to form a stream of WASH information: WATSAN, Sanitation, Water, Hygiene, and Global Health

WASH Finance

Costs and funding of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services for all

bacigalupe

Gonzalo Bacigalupe, EdD, MPH

Ross Bailey's Blog

Campaigns and digital innovations

Econosteez

Econemana

stichtingconnectinternational

www.connectinternational.nl

A Page from Tom Paulson

Global Health, Science and Journalism

recyclewater

Just another WordPress.com site

Source News Service Feedback's Blog

Focus Group Interviews to mesure spread, use and impact of IRC Services

Sustainable Sanitation in Emergency & Reconstruction

News of developments and innovations - collected by SuSanA working group 8

Peter J Bury 4 IRC

A journey into a "using a Blog for work" experience @ IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre

Medindo Água

Neste blog são sugeridos sites, textos e trabalhos técnicos sobre conservação, medição e perdas de água. Com o entendimento de que MEDIR é determinar ou avaliar a grandeza ou a quantidade de; calcular; regular; moderar; refrear; proporcionar; ponderar; analisar; ter a extensão de.

Insourced- Dr. Kate Tulenko

Thoughts on a healthier world

The Political Economy of Water Project

About water politics, economics, and other issues surrounding this vital resource.

Environmental Engineering Engenharia do Ambiente

This group aims sharing opportunities between Environmental Engineers / Este grupo tem como objectivo partilhar oportunidades entre profissionais de Engenharia do Ambiente (English / Português)

Global Health Dispatch

Diaries from the Field

%d bloggers like this: