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Archive for the ‘toilet’ Category

Where do yo shit by @WaterForPeple

Tue, 14Jan2014 Comments off

Great video! by Water For People, sure there are a lot of little details not mentioned, but you can not do better for a 5 minute video.

Paper: Compliance with Standards and Immerging Issues of Household Sewage Disposal Systems – Sri Lanka

Mon, 06Jan2014 Comments off

– No. 2 2013,
H. M. K. S. Bandara and M. M. M. Najim
Faculty of Science University of Kelaniya Kelaniya
Sri Lanka

ABSTRACT

Urban centers are highly significant with limited space together with the rising urban population.
Most of the houses and buildings are attached with some kind of
a sewage disposal facility as central sewage disposal systems are limited.
Urbanization is expected to create many problems in terms of black water disposal
due to limitation of land. A study was done in Gampaha municipality area, an
urban center, where there is no central sewage treatment facility. The objectives of
the study were to analyze the current situation of the black water disposal system in
the study area and to identify the shortcomings of the black water disposal system comparing with the standards.
The study was conducted within the urban center in
five GN divisions. Random samples of 44 households were selected to represent all
the five GN divisions. Selected households were interviewed to collect basic data
needed and physical measurements were also taken where necessary. The data
categories collected are household information, toilet type and size, desludging
interval and distance to nearest well. The code of practice for the design and
construction of septic tanks reports that 80% of urban communities use septic tanks
for sewage disposal, but this study reveals that only 18% of the population uses
septic tanks. Over 82% uses typical soakage pits that are constructed with loosely
constructed brick walls and bare bottom open to soil for their sewage disposal.
Over 68% of the households have their toilet pits within 15m to the nearest well,
which is below the recommended distance. Only 30% of the households comply with
over 15m to the nearest well that is recommended for septic tanks. The
recommended distance for the soakage pits to the nearest well is 30m and only 9%
of the households meet this standard. The black water disposal pits are over sized in
general, so that the desludging interval is more than 10 years. Recently constructed
houses, due to limitation of space, have reduced the size of the pits reducing f desludging interval.
The construction and placement of septic tanks or soakage pits in the area have not complied with the standards.

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s Urges Sanitation Be at Heart of Post-2015 Dev Framework

Sat, 09Nov2013 Comments off

Press Release

In Message for World Toilet Day, Secretary-General Urges that Sanitation Be at Heart of Post-2015 Development Framework

Following is UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s message for World Toilet Day, observed on 19 November:

Each year, more than 800,000 children under five die needlessly from diarrhoea — more than one child a minute.  Countless others fall seriously ill, with many suffering long-term health and developmental consequences.  Poor sanitation and hygiene are the primary cause.  Worldwide, some 2.5 billion people lack the benefits of adequate sanitation.  More than 1 billion people practise open defecation.  We must break the taboos and make sanitation for all a global development priority.

This first official observance by the United Nations of World Toilet Day is an opportunity to highlight this important topic.  Sanitation is central to human and environmental health.  It is essential for sustainable development, dignity and opportunity.  Poor water and sanitation cost developing countries around $260 billion a year — 1.5 per cent of their gross domestic product (GDP).  On the other hand, every dollar invested can bring a five-fold return by keeping people healthy and productive.  When schools offer decent toilets, 11 per cent more girls attend.  When women have access to a private latrine, they are less vulnerable to assault.

Despite the compelling moral and economic case for action on sanitation, progress has been too little and too slow.  That is why I launched a Call to Action on Sanitation this year to end open defecation by 2025 and build on existing efforts, such as Sanitation and Water for All and the Sanitation Drive to 2015, the target date for achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

We are a long way from achieving the MDG target of reducing by half the proportion of people lacking adequate sanitation.  We must urgently step up our efforts, with all actors working together for rapid, tangible results.  And, as we look beyond 2015, it is essential that sanitation is placed at the heart of the post-2015 development framework.  The solutions need not be expensive or technology driven.  There are many successful models that can be replicated and scaled up.  We must also work to educate at-risk communities and change cultural perceptions and long-standing practices that have no place in our modern world.

By working together — and by having an open and frank discussion on the importance of toilets and sanitation — we can improve the health and well-being of one third of the human family.  That is the goal of World Toilet Day.

Learn more  at the World Toilet Day Site:

What is World Toilet Day ?

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World Toilet Day is observed annually on 19 November. This international day of action aims to break the taboo around toilets and draw attention to the global sanitation challenge.

Can you imagine not having a toilet? Can you imagine not having privacy when you need to relieve yourself? Although unthinkable for those living in wealthy parts of the world, this is a harsh reality for many – in fact, one in three people on this globe, does not have access to a toilet! Have you ever thought about the true meaning of dignity?

World Toilet Day was created to pose exactly these kind of questions and to raise global awareness of the daily struggle for proper sanitation that a staggering 2.5 billion people face. World Toilet Day brings together different groups, such as media, the private sector, development organisations and civil society in a global movement to advocate for safe toilets. Since its inception in 2001, World Toilet Day has become an important platform to demand action from governments and to reach out to wider audiences by showing that toilets can be fun and sexy as well as vital to life.  more…

New Paper: Environmental & Sanitation Practices Among Diarrhoeal Patients India

Thu, 19Sep2013 Comments off

new paper

Reema Kumari(1), JV Singh(2)

1 Associate Professor,2 Prof. and Head Department of Community Medicine & Public Health, King Georges Medical University, Lucknow

njmsonline.org  – National Journal of Medical and Allied Sciences [NJMS]

ENVIRONMENTAL AND SANITATION PRACTICES AMONG DIARRHOEAL PATIENTS ADMITTED AT INFECTIOUS DISEASE HOSPITAL, LUCKNOW

Abstract

Introduction Diarrhoeal diseases are leading causes of mortality and morbidity in developing countries. Inspite of many programmes and facilities provided by the government towards prevention of diarrhoeal diseases, it continues to be a threat.
Objective: To study the sanitation and hygiene practices followed by patients of diarrhoea admitted at Infectious Disease Hospital (IDH).

Methodology: A descriptive cross sectional hospital based study conducted on 300 patients admitted at Infectious Diseases Hospital, King George’s Medical University, Lucknow. Patients were interviewed using a predesigned schedule after taking informed consent. Information regarding general characteristics including source of drinking water, sanitation practices, toilet facility available and mode of refuse disposable were taken. Data was analysed using SPSS 17.0 statistical software. Results: Majority (50.67%) of patients’ uses Municipal water supply/tap water as main source of drinking water and 30% patients uses India mark II hand pump. Around two-third of diarrhoeal patient practices hand washing with soap and water after household activities. Majority (63.33%) do not practices safe methods of storing drinking water, 87.33% uses sanitary latrines while 12.6% still uses open field for defecation. Almost half of the patients uses dustbin for refuse disposal. Use of sanitary latrines and India mark II drinking water was positively associated with higher socioeconomic status. Conclusion: In spite of the improved facilities of water and sanitation provided by the government, there exists a lacuna between its availability and their proper utilisation. This leads on to the burden of diarrhoeal patients on the health sector. Proper awareness regarding safe drinking water and sanitation practices and proper refuse disposal can reduce the diarrhoeal load.  view pdf…

WASHLink  from time to time likes to briefly note newly publish papers in hopes of giving  them a wider audience – let us know if you know of paper that could use this very small piece of publicity…

 

Toilet Revolution: Shyama V. Ramani at TEDxMaastricht

Mon, 16Sep2013 Comments off

This is one of the best Sanitation/ Global Health stories we have seen lately. Delivered in a  very pleasurable consumable format, by a great speaker who make the topic reachable to a board spectrum of professionals and people. It’s antidotal in nature, while being universal in the realities of solving a village’s sanitation issues. Shyama has an honesty that needs to be incorporated into the newly developing transparency practices oft the world’s NGOs . This talk needs to be shown to the NGO’s and their altruistic “minions” before they venture out to help their global brothers and sisters.

The story starts out after audience imagining life with out toilets with Shyama explaining how she as pure novice, walks into a coastal village after a tsunami, and realizes she must bring the villages toilets back.

She learns along the way  “…2.4 billion people don’t even have access to a toilet that functions, 1 billion don’t have access to any toilet the just have to defecate anywhere they can …” Thus the “….lack of waste management and toilets is making a killer that we are not talking about enough … diarrhea…. the number one killer in most developing countries…”

She Googles and contacts “experts” to educates herself with the facts to get the job done  or so she thinks.

Upon the last new toilet being being initiated with a squat of a villager behind closed doors, Shyama, unlike many of the NGO’s, does not walked away.  The core of her captivating story is what happens afterward … The door is opened, the veil of naivety is exposed and lifted. Where/when most project fall into failure, she and her partner begins the long diagnostic/prognostic/improvement cycle.

Shyama  reminds us it is a an effort that is ongoing with more to learn and invites us to come back… It will be a crime if we do not see the next installment of this story as it continues to unfold.

Essential and very practical points abound within her story. One that are be showing up in other stories from around the world- and  hopepfully becoming a  din that must be addressed. With some paraphrasing, here are a few I see tucked in her tail:
1 NGO’s can’t do it alone and succeed; the villagers are needed – with a vastly redefined roll for NGOs.
2 Technical experts/ engineers may not be the social experts – both are needed.
3 Toilets at the onset are not alway seen as valuable/desirable assets. Education is needed before during and after
4 Women and men of the villages do not have the same perspective on sanitation. The project must address both separately as well as together .
5 Villages without ongoing support services will quickly have “…fossils of abandoned stinking toilets allover…”
6 Schools as an institution do not just naturally promote and desire ecosan toilets. They must also be nurtured. (details not addressed in this piece – but would be important to learn more about)
7 Building heathy social stimulus/pressure/ pride must be part of the scope
8 People who want the toilet must be educated on use and care
9 The villagers must be part of the economic model – the social model. Such pieces as manufacturing / construction/ distribution/ sales/ support / education/ promotion/ etc
10 Microfinance is a viable solution – (a work in progress in the story)
11 Toilets can provide a financially valuable natural resource – fertilizer
12 This all makes it a slower road, but it is a viable road, unlike the fast road the many NGO’s are building.
13 100% may be the target but  80% is a not a bad number to start with- and even that require lots of work.

Shyama  reminds us it’s a an effort that is ongoing and invites us to come back ,so to speak.  It will be a crime if we do not see the next installment of this story as it continues to unfold.

 

Homage to Peter Morgan 2013 Stockholm Water Prize Laureate

Tue, 03Sep2013 Comments off

Stockholm, Sweden – Dr. Peter Morgan has been named the 2013 Stockholm Water Prize Laureate for his work to protect the health and lives of millions of people through improved sanitation and water technologies.

H.M. King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden will present the prize to Dr. Peter Morgan at a Royal Award Ceremony during the 2013 World Water Week in Stockholm on September 5.

Over the past four decades, Dr. Morgan has invented and advanced low-cost practical solutions to provide access to safe sanitation and clean water that are being used by millions of people worldwide.

“Many currently existing solutions to provide clean water and sanitation are unaffordable, impractical and out of reach for the world’s poorest people,” said the Stockholm Water Prize Committee in its citation. “As a result of Dr. Morgan’s pioneering work to develop practical water and sanitation technologies for those most in need, countless communities now enjoy safer water, a cleaner environment and quality of life.” more: site  or  pdf press release and Highlights from ceremony 

Relate YouTube interviews and stories

 

Related books/pubs

Related Companies / Organizations

Aquamor (Private) Limited

” is a small private research and development company based in the city of Harare, the capital of Zimbabwe. This website was originally established in 2001 to describe the work of Peter Morgan who has been involved in research and development within the rural water supply, hygiene and sanitation sector for nearly 40 years. Most of the research work, has been undertaken in Zimbabwe, but the results of this are being applied in several countries in Africa as well as Zimbabwe. The main role of Aquamor is to explore new ideas, concepts and technologies which move the “state of the art” of this sector forward. … more”

Blair Research Laboratory

The lab was renamed in 2011 to the National Institute of Health Research NIHR under  The Ministry of Health and Child Welfare more details on renaming…

About

Learn more about Stockholm Water Prize and previous Laureates

Learn more about The Stockholm International Water Institute

TEDx – Sheer Stess Heat for Reinventing the Toilet- AJ Johannes Oklahoma State U

Sun, 01Sep2013 Comments off

Oklahoma State University Professor AJ Johannes has a dirty job. Along with his colleagues, Johannes is reinventing the toilet with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Through his research, Johannes and his team have the potential to affect 2.5 million people without modern plumbing.

source

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