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1st International Terra Preta Sanitation Conference Aug 2013

Mon, 17Jun2013 1 comment

1st International Terra Preta Sanitation Conference Aug 2013

Location:Hamburg University of Technology. The campus is located in Hamburg-Harburg.

Dates: Wednesday, 28  –  Saturday  31 August 2013

Background

…An analysis of a former civilisation in the Amazon, nowadays Brazil, reveals concepts which enable a highly efficient handling of organic wastes. Terra Preta do Indio is the anthropogenic black soil that was produced by ancient cultures through the conversion of biowaste and faecal matter into long-term fertile soils. These soils have maintained high amounts of organic carbon even several thousand years after they were abandoned. It was recently discovered that around 10% of the originally infertile soils in the Amazon region was converted this way from around 7,000 until 500 years ago. Due to the accumulation of charred biomass and other organic residues, terra preta subsequently formed giving it a deep, distinctly dark and highly fertile soil layer.One of the surprising facts is that this soil is highly productive without adding fertiliser.

Recent research concludes that this culture had a superior sanitation and bio-waste system that was based on source separation of faecal matter, urine and clever additives particularly charcoal dust and treatment steps for the solids resulting in high yielding gardening. Additives included ground charcoal dust while the treatment and smell prevention started with anaerobic lactic-acid fermentation followed by vermicomposting.The generation of new Terra Preta (‘terra preta nova’) based on the safe treatment of human waste could be the basis for sustainable agriculture in the twenty-first century to produce food for billions of people….

Speakers / Sessions

Thursday
Conference Keynote Dr. Haiko Pieplow (tbc)
Session 1: TP soils, soil fertility, organic farming
Key note from Bruno Glaser or Albrecht von Sydow (Germany) (tbc)

  • T. Theuretzbacher (Austria): Investigation on Terra Preta like products on the german-Austrian market
  • N. Andreev (Moldava): The effect of terra preta like substrate on germination and shoot growth of radish and parsley
  • H. Factura (Philippines): Addressing Poor Sanitation and Generating Added Values through Terra Preta Sanitation
  • B. Pelivanoski (Germany): Terra Pellet – an organic fertilizer inspired by terra preta

Session 2: TPS Applications, Quality of products, hygienic parameter, legislation, certification
Keynote presentation Prof. Srikanth Mutnuri (India) (tbc): Terra Preta as an Alternative for the Management of Sludge from Waste Water Treatment Plant

  • S. Böttger (Germany): Terra Preta – production from sewage sludges of decentralised wastewater systems
  • M. Stöckl (Germany): Vermicomposting of fecal matter and organic waste – a quality assessment of products
  • D. Meier Kohlstock (Germany): The integration of Terra Preta Sanitation in European nutrient cycles – Options for alternative policies and economies

Session 3: Terra Preta Sanitation: toilet systems and designs / Logistic and operation / practical examples
Keynote speech Prof. Charlotte de Fraiture (Netherlands) (tbc)

  • R. Wagner (Germany): New challenges of resource management in the Botanic Garden Berlin by producing and applying biochar substrates
  • R. Kuipers (Netherlands): A socio-economic assessment of urine separation, with a reflection on the possibilities for Terra Preta Sanitation, for the recycling of nutrients to rural agriculture in the Philippines
  • M. Bulbo (Ethiopia): TP application in Ethiopia
  • R. Wolf (Germany): Application of Fermented Urine for build up of Terra Preta Humus in a Permaculture Park and Social Impact on the Community Involved

Friday
Session 4: Carbon composting of biowaste and excreta/Climate farming / wood gas technology for energy and char coal production / Pyrolysis vs. hydrothermal carbonization
Keynote presentation Prof. Zifu Li (China) (tbc): Energy balance analysis on the pyrolysis process of animal manure
T. Voss (Germany): Wood gasification in parallel flow fixbed gasifieres for combined energy and charcoal production – experiences from six years of operation (abstact follows)

  • C. vom Eyser (Germany): Product quality of ç from sewage sludge in terms of micropollutants
  • E. Someus (Sweden): Reducing mineral fertilisers and chemicals use in agriculture by recycling treated organic waste as compost and bio-char products
  • J. Fingas (Germany): Climate farming – Practical experience from sub-Saharan Afrika

Session 5: Microbiology, sanitization and lactic acid fermentation
Keynote presentation Dr. Gina Itchon (Philippines): The Effectivity of the Terra Preta Sanitation (TPS) Process in the Elimination of Parasite Eggs in Fecal Matter: A Field Trial of TPS in Mindanao, Philippines

  • A. Yemaneh (Germany/Ethiopia): Investigation of Low-Cost Sugar Supplement for Lactic Acid Fermentation of Human Excreta in Terra Preta Sanitation System
  • A. Febriana (Indonesia): Faeces Treatment By Lactofermentation Process Based On Terra Preta Sanitation System Concept
  • A. Walter (Austria): Microbial communities in charcoal and microbe amended composts
  • F. Scheinemann (Germany): Sanitation and conservation of nutrients in cattle manure and sewage sludge by anerobic fermentation

Click here to go to the conference website

Organisation Committee

Institute of Wastewater Management and Water Protection at TUHH
GFEU e. V.
WECF

Co-Organisers

Institute of Environmental Technology and Energy Economics at TUHH
German WASH Network
UNESCO IHE
BDZ

all details are from their site

1st International IWA Conference on Holistic Sludge Management

Fri, 25Jan2013 2 comments

An IWA specialist conference

iwa-logo

6-8 May 2013
Västerås, Sweden

Websites: http://www.hsm2013.se/  and http://www.iwahq.org/1qh/events/iwa-events/2013/4.html

The purpose of this conference is to provide a forum for researchers and practitioners to exchange the latest developments in sludge management.It will give possibilities to examine and discuss the different challenges connected to resource recovery through treatment and disposal of wastewater sludge.

The conference covers sludge management and anaerobic digestion with a broad holistic system perspective. It includes the recycling of nutrients such as phosphorus and nitrogen by focusing on upstream treatment to reduce harmful substances in wastewater, as well as on the production of biogas as a fuel for vehicles. The certification of treated sludge is another important condition for the possibilities to recycle sludge to farmland areas.

Conference  also want to share knowledge, practices and ideas for the future directions of process development. The sludge treatment is one of the key issues to be solved. The aim of the conference is to take a major step forward to where all aspects of sludge management are addressed.

Proposed Themes:

  • Production and utilization of biogas
  • Nutrient recovery processes
  • Processes for hygienization of sludge
  • The need for a holistic approach including i.e. environmental effects from sludge handling/management in the total performance efficiency of wastewater treatment
  • Use of sludge for energy generation including combustion and supercritical gasification
  • Emerging contaminants in sludge – upstream separation and optimization to decrease negative effects by detoxification
  • Physical and chemical pre-treatment processes, including chemical conditioning, thickening, dewatering, drying
  • Modelling of anaerobic processes
  • Methane emission from sludge treatment

Contact:
Erik Dahlquist at erik.dahlquist@mdh.se and Tel. +46-21-151768
Conference Programme Committee Chairman
Monica Odlare at monica.odlare@mdh.se and Tel. +46-21-101611
Conference Programme Committee Secretary

IWA- the global network for water professionals

The International Water Association is a global reference point for water professionals, spanning the continuum between research and practice and covering all facets of the water cycle. Through its network of members and experts in research, practice, regulation, industry, consulting and manufacturing, IWA is in a better position than any other organisation to help water professionals create innovative, pragmatic and sustainable solutions to challenging global needs.

The strength of IWA lies in the professional and geographic diversity of its membership — a global mosaic of national, corporate and individual member communities. Our members are leaders in their field and represent:

  • Researchers – where solutions begin
  • Utilities – managing water services worldwide
  • Consultants – connecting problem owners with solution providers
  • Industry – creating sustainable water solutions
  • Regulators – safeguarding public health
  • Equipment manufacturers – translating ideas into products

The IWA network is structured to promote multi-level collaboration among its diverse membership groups, and to share the benefit of knowledge on water science and management worldwide. The Association helps make the right connections at the right time, thereby sharing cutting-edge research and practice that allows the water sector shape its future.

Links to other great IWA events

all content for this post  comes from the  IWA sites

Faecal Sludge Management Conference FSM2

Thu, 27Sep2012 Comments off

International Convention Centre (ICC) Durban 29-31 October 2012

The second conference on developments in Faecal Sludge Management

The second conference on developments in Faecal Sludge Management is just around the corner in Durban. We are pleased to share with you the conference themes and to highlight a number of our keynote speakers and paper submissions.

Programme

The excellent response to the call for papers has resulted in a programme featuring speakers from around the globe, confirming that there is much experience and knowledge to be shared in this critical area. The second international Faecal Sludge Management conference will include presentations that fall into the following themes:

  • On-site Sanitation as a Business
  • Socio-political Aspects of On-site Sanitation
  • Toilet Design for FSM Optimisation
  • Pit Emptying – What are the Options?
  • The How of Faecal Sludge Treatment
  • Waste Not Want Not – Beneficial Use of Faecal Sludges Technology and Innovation
  • Health Aspects of Faecal Sludges

FSM2 will pick up where FSM 1 (held in Durban in March 2011) left off – with a commitment to capturing and sharing developments in the management and beneficiation of faecal sludges (including urine). This year the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) has committed to showcase and present developments in up to 40 of their Sanitation Grand Challenge Projects. For more information on FSM 1 see “What happens when the pit is full?” at http://www.afrisan.org

Presenters

Presenters at FSM2 will share experiences from countries around the world including Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Chile, Ethiopia, Ghana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Malawi, Madagascar, Mozambique, Nepal, Sweden, South Africa, the USA, the United Kingdom, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The line-up of keynote speakers includes:

Dr Doulaye Koné – Senior Programme Officer, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

The BMGF has committed over $200Million over the next few years to research and advocacy in this field which it has identified as a major area for impacting health in the developing world.

Dr Linda Strande – Programme Leader of Excreta and Wastewater Management, Eawag/Sandec

FSM research overview of Sandec (Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries). EAWAG (The Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology) is a leader in the FSM field, and manages research projects around the world. The organisation is currently compiling a book on the subject of Faecal Sludge Management.

Steve Sugden – Research Manager, Water for People and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
will look at Sanitation as a Business, drawing on his experiences with the development and transfer of the Gulper technology into commercial businesses – giving valuable insight into the process of taking a technology from concept into the marketplace.

Pam Elardo, Director of the Wastewater Treatment Division in the Department of Natural Resources and Parks, Seattle, Washington Evolution of a regional wastewater management system: matching decisions to capacity

There will 9 presentations in plenary sessions, 90 presentations in parallel sessions and a closing panel discussion. The speakers and the topics cover a wide range of interest and represent work from all over the globe. The detailed draft programme for the conference can be downloaded from www.pid.co.za .

For more information contact the FSM2 secretariat :

Bobbie Louton on Tel +27 33 342 3012 or email: fsm2@pid.co.za

all content above take from pdf: http://www.pid.co.za/images/stories/1fsm2_durban_third_announcement.pdf found on FSM Conference page part of

Partners in Development (Pty) Ltd (PID) site.   A site worth looking at even if you don’t go to the conference

Bill Gates Names Winners of the Reinvent the Toilet Challenge

Wed, 15Aug2012 Comments off

Loughbourough Portotype

Loughbourough Portotype (Photo credit: Gates Foundation)

Bill Gates with a researcher from California I...

Bill Gates with a researcher from California Institute of Technology at the Reinvent the Toilet Fair in Seattle on August 14, 2012. (Photo credit: Gates Foundation)

Bill Gates with a researcher from the Universi...

Bill Gates with a researcher from the University of Toronto at the Reinvent the Toilet Fair (Photo credit: Gates Foundation)

“Next-generation” toilets showcased at Gates Foundation offer innovative sanitation solutions that can save and improve lives around the world

SEATTLE, (August 14, 2012) /PRNewswire/ — Bill Gates today announced the winners of the Reinvent the Toilet Challenge—an effort to develop “next-generation” toilets that will deliver safe and sustainable sanitation to the 2.5 billion people worldwide who don’t have it. The awards recognize researchers from leading universities who are developing innovative ways to manage human waste, which will help improve the health and lives of people around the world.

California Institute of Technology in the United States received the $100,000 first prize for designing a solar-powered toilet that generates hydrogen and electricity. Loughborough University in the United Kingdom won the $60,000 second place prize for a toilet that produces biological charcoal, minerals, and clean water. University of Toronto in Canada won the third place prize of $40,000 for a toilet that sanitizes feces and urine and recovers resources and clean water. Special recognition and $40,000 went to Eawag (Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology) and EOOS for their outstanding design of a toilet user interface.

One year ago, the foundation issued a challenge to universities to design toilets that can capture and process human waste without piped water, sewer or electrical connections, and transform human waste into useful resources, such as energy and water, at an affordable price.

The first, second, and third place winning prototypes were recognized for most closely matching the criteria presented in the Reinvent the Toilet Challenge.

Teams are showcasing their prototypes and projects at a two-day event held at the foundation’s headquarters in Seattle on August 14 and 15. The Reinvent the Toilet Fair is bringing together participants from 29 countries, including researchers, designers, investors, advocates, and representatives of the communities who will ultimately adopt these new inventions.

“Innovative solutions change people’s lives for the better,” said foundation Co-chair Bill Gates. “If we apply creative thinking to everyday challenges, such as dealing with human waste, we can fix some of the world’s toughest problems.”

Unsafe methods to capture and treat human waste result in serious health problems and death. Food and water tainted with fecal matter result in 1.5 million child deaths every year. Most of these deaths could be prevented with the introduction of proper sanitation, along with safe drinking water and improved hygiene.

Improving access to sanitation can also bring substantial economic benefits. According to the World Health Organization, improved sanitation delivers up to $9 in social and economic benefits for every $1 invested because it increases productivity, reduces healthcare costs, and prevents illness, disability, and early death.

Other projects featured at the fair include better ways to empty latrines, user-centered designs for public toilet facilities, and insect-based latrines that decompose feces faster.

“Imagine what’s possible if we continue to collaborate, stimulate new investment in this sector, and apply our ingenuity in the years ahead,” said Gates. “Many of these innovations will not only revolutionize sanitation in the developing world, but also help transform our dependence on traditional flush toilets in wealthy nations.”

Gates added: “All the participants are united by a common desire to create a better world – a world where no child dies needlessly from a lack of safe sanitation and where all people can live healthy, dignified lives.”

The Water, Sanitation & Hygiene (WSH) initiative is part of the foundation’s Global Development Program, which addresses issues such as agricultural development and financial services—problems that affect the world’s poorest people but do not receive adequate attention. WSH has committed more than $370 million to this area, with a focus on developing sustainable sanitation services that work for everyone, including the poor.

The foundation also announced a second round of Reinvent the Toilet Challenge grants totaling nearly $3.4 million. The grants were awarded to: Cranfield University (United Kingdom); Eram Scientific Solutions Private Limited (India); Research Triangle Institute (United States); and the University of Colorado Boulder (United States).

###

Editor’s Notes:

Reinvent the Toilet Challenge Round 2 Winners

Cranfield University
This nearly $810,000 grant will help develop a prototype toilet that removes water from human waste and vaporizes it using a hand-operated vacuum pump and a unique membrane system. The remaining solids are turned into fuel that can also be used as fertilizer. The water vapor is condensed and can be used for washing, or irrigation.
Contact: Fiona Siebrits/ +44 (0) 1234 758040 / f.c.siebrits@cranfield.ac.uk

Eram Scientific Solutions Private Limited
A grant of more than $450,000 will make public toilets more accessible to the urban poor via the eco-friendly and hygienic “eToilet.”
Contact: Miss Ria John / +0471 4062125 / riajohn@eramscientific.com

Research Triangle Institute
This $1.3 million grant will fund the development of a self-contained toilet system that disinfects liquid waste and turns solid waste into fuel or electricity through a revolutionary new biomass energy conversion unit.
Contact: Lisa Bistreich-Wolfe / +1 919.316.3596 / lbistreich@rti.org

Universcity of Colorado Boulder
A nearly $780,000 grant will help develop a solar toilet that uses concentrated sunlight, directed and focused with a solar dish and concentrator, to disinfect liquid-solid waste and produce biological charcoal (biochar) that can be used as a replacement for wood charcoal or chemical fertilizers.
Contact: Karl Linden / +1 303 302 0188/ Carol Rowe / +1 303 492 7426 / Carol.Rowe@colorado.edu

For photos, b-roll, and additional information, please visit our Newsmarket site.

###

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Guided by the belief that every life has equal value, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation works to help all people lead healthy, productive lives. In developing countries, it focuses on improving people’s health with vaccines and other lifesaving tools and giving them the chance to lift themselves out of hunger and extreme poverty. In the United States, it seeks to significantly improve education so that all young people have the opportunity to reach their full potential. Based in Seattle, Washington, the foundation is led by CEO Jeff Raikes and Co-chair William H. Gates Sr., under the direction of Bill and Melinda Gates and Warren Buffett. To learn more, visit www.gatesfoundation.org. You can also join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter, and our blog www.impatientoptimists.org.

 

Related Documents

Background: Reinvent the Toilet
Reinvent the Toilet Fair Program
Exhibitor Technology Guide: Reinvent the Toilet Fair 2012

Related Links

NewsMarket
Water, Sanitation, Hygiene Strategy Overview
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Impatient Optimists

press release Translations

French
German

source of all materials http://www.multivu.com/mnr/49395-bill-gates-names-winners-of-the-reinvent-the-toilet-challenge

 

 

DRY TOILET 2009 Conference proceedings and presentations

Sun, 27Dec2009 Comments off

The proceedings from the DRY TOILET 2009 conference held by Global Dry Toilet Association of Finland are  available   They are  a great resource and available at  http://huussi.net/tapahtumat/DT2009/full.html

The summary  is also avaliable in  – suomi (Finish) and Russian as a pdf

The Suomi version of the  home page is http://www.huussi.net/

Session Presentations

&
Country Focus

1 PROMOTING ECOLOGICAL SANITATION IN ORDER TO
ACHIEVE MDG’S
  • “Composting Toilet – The Bangalore, India experience”
  • Sustainable sanitation in Namibia’s lowest income urban
    areas: “The potential of composting toilets”
  • “To dry or not to dry?-People matter in scaling up dry
    sanitation”
  • “Dry Toilets in Tajikistan”
  • “Sustainable sanitation beyond Taps & Toilet”
  • “Prevalence of Ecological sanitation uptake and associated
    factors in Kabale municipality, Uganda”
India,
Namibia, Finland, Tajikistan, Nepal, Uganda
2 HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS RELATED TO DRY
SANITATION
  • “Toilets and health throughout history”
  • “The public health safety of using human excreta from urine
    diverting toilets for agriculture: The Philippine experience”
  • “Dry Toilet – A boon to rural community”
  • “Ecological sanitation: inactivation of pathogens in faeces
    from dry toilet – grey water disposal”
  • “From pit latrine to a safe and sustainable toilet.”
  • “Possible public health implication of excreta re-use in
    poorly sanitated rural farming communities of Ebonyi state, South-East
    Nigeria”
Philippines, India, Argentina, Belarus, Nigeria
3 IMPLEMENTING ECOLOGICAL SANITATION IN
EMERGENCIES
  • “Sanitation in the disaster cycle – immediate response,
    preparedness and risk reduction”
  • “Provision of Dry Toilets in earthquake hit areas of
    Pakistan – learning from first hand experience”
  • “Eco-toilet for disaster preparedness”
  • “Introducing ecological sanitation in emergency: Some
    lessons learned from a pilot project Bangladesh”
  • “Sanitation in IDP and refugee camps in Chad: the current
    and future challenges”
Pakistan,
Bangladesh, Chad
4a PROSPECTS AND CHALLENGES IN RE-USE OF EXCRETA
  • “Pathogens of concern for developing countries and risk of
    reusing ecosan sludge in agriculture”
  • “Urine from separating toilets for non-edible plants”
  • “From pit latrine to nutrient conservation”
  • “Re-use of human’s urine in market-gardening in
    South-Benin: financial returns analysis”
  • “Biogas generation – a multi-dimensional development
    approach”
Mexico,
Benin, Ethiopia
4b PROSPECTS AND CHALLENGES IN RE-USE OF
EXCRETA continues
  • “Dry toilet compost and separated urine as fertilisers for
    cabbage and potato – a case study from Finland “
  • “Prospects and Challenges in the reuse of human excreta in
    Nakuru Municipality, Kenya”
  • “Use of Faecal Sludge for Agriculture in Tamale Metropolis:
    perception of Farmers, Consumers and Relevant Agencies”
  • “Positive spin offs using mobile urinals and UD toilets in
    Burkina Faso”
  • “Study on the compost produced by compost bins and ecosan
    latrines and survey on knowledge attitudes and practices in usage of
    compost bins and ecosan latrines”
Finland,
Kenya, Ghana, Burkina Faso,

Sri Lanka

5 CHALLENGES IN IMPLEMENTING ECOLOGICAL
SANITATION
  • “Evaluation of social and cultural acceptance of the
    biotoilet system”
  • “Social representattions of hygiene and excretes disposal -
    The case of ecological dry toilets introduction in Quibdo and
    Tumaco-Columbia”
  • “Towards a common goal. The challenges of the sanitation
    sector in Zambia”
  • “Living with the marginalised: Addressing the
    socio-economic and cultural aspects in implementing Oka-Dry Toilets in
    Madimba; case of Lusaka”
  • Sari Huuhtanen*, Finland; Michelo Katambo, Zambia:
  • “The challenge of social change; experiences from Zambia
    dry-sanitation project (ZASP, 2006-2008)”
Mexico,
Columbia, Zambia
6 GENDER ASPECTS
RELATED TO DRY SANITATION
  • “Gender aspects of ecological sanitation with urine
    diverting dry toilets”
  • “Female local latrine builders: Contributing towards
    objectives of International Year of Sanitation, 2008″
  • “Women and ecological sanitation”
  • “Promotion of dry toilets for reducing vulnerability for
    the poor women having Islamic and cultural values in urban slums of
    Bangladesh”
Nepal,
Uganda, Bangladesh
7a TECHNICAL
DEVELOPMENT OF DRY TOILETS
  • “Is the
    Agricultural utilisation of Treated Urine and Faces recommendable?”
  • “Developing low cost composting toilet for developing
    countries”
  • “Solar thermal sanitation of human faeces – an affordable
    solution for
    ensuring sustainability of EcoSan activities”
  • “Feasibility assessment of application of onsite volume
    reduction
    system (OVRS) for source-separated urine”
  • “Urban slum dwellers in Kenya and Bangladesh benefit from
    using Peepoo
    bags which are self-sanitising and biodegradable”
Kenya and
Bangladesh and others
7b TECHICAL
DEVELOPMENT OF DRY TOILETS continues
  • “From the outhouse to indoor dry toilets in Finland”
  • “Estimation of water evaporation rate from composting
    toilet”
  • “Implementation of urine-diverting dry toilets in
    multi-storey apartment buildings in Ethiopia”
  • Dry sanitation in multi-story apartment buildings: “The
    case of Dongsheng, Inner Mongolia, China”
  • “The humanure toilet”
Finland,
Ethiopia, Inner Mongolia, China
8 CAPACITY
BUILDING
  • “Going to scale with urine diversion in Sweden – From
    individual households to municipal systems in 15 years”
  • “The processes of adaption during the introducing urine
    diverting toilets in Kyrgyzstan”
  • “Influence of social, cultural, economic and gender aspects
    in dry toilet as eco-sanitation tool. Case study of Sukuma-nomadic
    community in Malinyi, Tanzania.”
  • “Experiences with ecosan systems to provide sustainable
    sanitation for schools in Kenya and India”
  • “Gold Factory – An experimental art project with dry
    toilets”
Sweden,
Kyrgyzstan, Tanzania,Kenya, India
Side event SUSTAINABLE
SANITATION FOR TOURISM AND RECREATION
  • “Toilet provision in the Cairngorms national park,
    Scotland, UK”
  • “Experience of biotoilet installations on Kizhi island,
    Republic of Karelia, Russia”
  • “Promotion of sustainable development of rural communities
    around especially protected natural areas in Kazakhstan”
  • “Public toilets and care practices in nature parks in
    Finland, current situation and recommendations for improvement”
Scotland,
Republic of Karelia, Russia, Kazakhstan, Finland

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