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1st International IWA Conference on Holistic Sludge Management

Fri, 25Jan2013 2 comments

An IWA specialist conference

iwa-logo

6-8 May 2013
Västerås, Sweden

Websites: http://www.hsm2013.se/  and http://www.iwahq.org/1qh/events/iwa-events/2013/4.html

The purpose of this conference is to provide a forum for researchers and practitioners to exchange the latest developments in sludge management.It will give possibilities to examine and discuss the different challenges connected to resource recovery through treatment and disposal of wastewater sludge.

The conference covers sludge management and anaerobic digestion with a broad holistic system perspective. It includes the recycling of nutrients such as phosphorus and nitrogen by focusing on upstream treatment to reduce harmful substances in wastewater, as well as on the production of biogas as a fuel for vehicles. The certification of treated sludge is another important condition for the possibilities to recycle sludge to farmland areas.

Conference  also want to share knowledge, practices and ideas for the future directions of process development. The sludge treatment is one of the key issues to be solved. The aim of the conference is to take a major step forward to where all aspects of sludge management are addressed.

Proposed Themes:

  • Production and utilization of biogas
  • Nutrient recovery processes
  • Processes for hygienization of sludge
  • The need for a holistic approach including i.e. environmental effects from sludge handling/management in the total performance efficiency of wastewater treatment
  • Use of sludge for energy generation including combustion and supercritical gasification
  • Emerging contaminants in sludge – upstream separation and optimization to decrease negative effects by detoxification
  • Physical and chemical pre-treatment processes, including chemical conditioning, thickening, dewatering, drying
  • Modelling of anaerobic processes
  • Methane emission from sludge treatment

Contact:
Erik Dahlquist at erik.dahlquist@mdh.se and Tel. +46-21-151768
Conference Programme Committee Chairman
Monica Odlare at monica.odlare@mdh.se and Tel. +46-21-101611
Conference Programme Committee Secretary

IWA- the global network for water professionals

The International Water Association is a global reference point for water professionals, spanning the continuum between research and practice and covering all facets of the water cycle. Through its network of members and experts in research, practice, regulation, industry, consulting and manufacturing, IWA is in a better position than any other organisation to help water professionals create innovative, pragmatic and sustainable solutions to challenging global needs.

The strength of IWA lies in the professional and geographic diversity of its membership — a global mosaic of national, corporate and individual member communities. Our members are leaders in their field and represent:

  • Researchers – where solutions begin
  • Utilities – managing water services worldwide
  • Consultants – connecting problem owners with solution providers
  • Industry – creating sustainable water solutions
  • Regulators – safeguarding public health
  • Equipment manufacturers – translating ideas into products

The IWA network is structured to promote multi-level collaboration among its diverse membership groups, and to share the benefit of knowledge on water science and management worldwide. The Association helps make the right connections at the right time, thereby sharing cutting-edge research and practice that allows the water sector shape its future.

Links to other great IWA events

all content for this post  comes from the  IWA sites

Faecal Sludge Management Conference FSM2

Thu, 27Sep2012 Comments off

International Convention Centre (ICC) Durban 29-31 October 2012

The second conference on developments in Faecal Sludge Management

The second conference on developments in Faecal Sludge Management is just around the corner in Durban. We are pleased to share with you the conference themes and to highlight a number of our keynote speakers and paper submissions.

Programme

The excellent response to the call for papers has resulted in a programme featuring speakers from around the globe, confirming that there is much experience and knowledge to be shared in this critical area. The second international Faecal Sludge Management conference will include presentations that fall into the following themes:

  • On-site Sanitation as a Business
  • Socio-political Aspects of On-site Sanitation
  • Toilet Design for FSM Optimisation
  • Pit Emptying – What are the Options?
  • The How of Faecal Sludge Treatment
  • Waste Not Want Not – Beneficial Use of Faecal Sludges Technology and Innovation
  • Health Aspects of Faecal Sludges

FSM2 will pick up where FSM 1 (held in Durban in March 2011) left off – with a commitment to capturing and sharing developments in the management and beneficiation of faecal sludges (including urine). This year the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) has committed to showcase and present developments in up to 40 of their Sanitation Grand Challenge Projects. For more information on FSM 1 see “What happens when the pit is full?” at http://www.afrisan.org

Presenters

Presenters at FSM2 will share experiences from countries around the world including Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Chile, Ethiopia, Ghana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Malawi, Madagascar, Mozambique, Nepal, Sweden, South Africa, the USA, the United Kingdom, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The line-up of keynote speakers includes:

Dr Doulaye Koné – Senior Programme Officer, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

The BMGF has committed over $200Million over the next few years to research and advocacy in this field which it has identified as a major area for impacting health in the developing world.

Dr Linda Strande – Programme Leader of Excreta and Wastewater Management, Eawag/Sandec

FSM research overview of Sandec (Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries). EAWAG (The Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology) is a leader in the FSM field, and manages research projects around the world. The organisation is currently compiling a book on the subject of Faecal Sludge Management.

Steve Sugden – Research Manager, Water for People and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
will look at Sanitation as a Business, drawing on his experiences with the development and transfer of the Gulper technology into commercial businesses – giving valuable insight into the process of taking a technology from concept into the marketplace.

Pam Elardo, Director of the Wastewater Treatment Division in the Department of Natural Resources and Parks, Seattle, Washington Evolution of a regional wastewater management system: matching decisions to capacity

There will 9 presentations in plenary sessions, 90 presentations in parallel sessions and a closing panel discussion. The speakers and the topics cover a wide range of interest and represent work from all over the globe. The detailed draft programme for the conference can be downloaded from www.pid.co.za .

For more information contact the FSM2 secretariat :

Bobbie Louton on Tel +27 33 342 3012 or email: fsm2@pid.co.za

all content above take from pdf: http://www.pid.co.za/images/stories/1fsm2_durban_third_announcement.pdf found on FSM Conference page part of

Partners in Development (Pty) Ltd (PID) site.   A site worth looking at even if you don’t go to the conference

DRY TOILET 2009 Conference proceedings and presentations

Sun, 27Dec2009 Comments off

The proceedings from the DRY TOILET 2009 conference held by Global Dry Toilet Association of Finland are  available   They are  a great resource and available at  http://huussi.net/tapahtumat/DT2009/full.html

The summary  is also avaliable in  – suomi (Finish) and Russian as a pdf

The Suomi version of the  home page is http://www.huussi.net/

Session Presentations

&
Country Focus

1 PROMOTING ECOLOGICAL SANITATION IN ORDER TO
ACHIEVE MDG’S
  • “Composting Toilet – The Bangalore, India experience”
  • Sustainable sanitation in Namibia’s lowest income urban
    areas: “The potential of composting toilets”
  • “To dry or not to dry?-People matter in scaling up dry
    sanitation”
  • “Dry Toilets in Tajikistan”
  • “Sustainable sanitation beyond Taps & Toilet”
  • “Prevalence of Ecological sanitation uptake and associated
    factors in Kabale municipality, Uganda”
India,
Namibia, Finland, Tajikistan, Nepal, Uganda
2 HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS RELATED TO DRY
SANITATION
  • “Toilets and health throughout history”
  • “The public health safety of using human excreta from urine
    diverting toilets for agriculture: The Philippine experience”
  • “Dry Toilet – A boon to rural community”
  • “Ecological sanitation: inactivation of pathogens in faeces
    from dry toilet – grey water disposal”
  • “From pit latrine to a safe and sustainable toilet.”
  • “Possible public health implication of excreta re-use in
    poorly sanitated rural farming communities of Ebonyi state, South-East
    Nigeria”
Philippines, India, Argentina, Belarus, Nigeria
3 IMPLEMENTING ECOLOGICAL SANITATION IN
EMERGENCIES
  • “Sanitation in the disaster cycle – immediate response,
    preparedness and risk reduction”
  • “Provision of Dry Toilets in earthquake hit areas of
    Pakistan – learning from first hand experience”
  • “Eco-toilet for disaster preparedness”
  • “Introducing ecological sanitation in emergency: Some
    lessons learned from a pilot project Bangladesh”
  • “Sanitation in IDP and refugee camps in Chad: the current
    and future challenges”
Pakistan,
Bangladesh, Chad
4a PROSPECTS AND CHALLENGES IN RE-USE OF EXCRETA
  • “Pathogens of concern for developing countries and risk of
    reusing ecosan sludge in agriculture”
  • “Urine from separating toilets for non-edible plants”
  • “From pit latrine to nutrient conservation”
  • “Re-use of human’s urine in market-gardening in
    South-Benin: financial returns analysis”
  • “Biogas generation – a multi-dimensional development
    approach”
Mexico,
Benin, Ethiopia
4b PROSPECTS AND CHALLENGES IN RE-USE OF
EXCRETA continues
  • “Dry toilet compost and separated urine as fertilisers for
    cabbage and potato – a case study from Finland “
  • “Prospects and Challenges in the reuse of human excreta in
    Nakuru Municipality, Kenya”
  • “Use of Faecal Sludge for Agriculture in Tamale Metropolis:
    perception of Farmers, Consumers and Relevant Agencies”
  • “Positive spin offs using mobile urinals and UD toilets in
    Burkina Faso”
  • “Study on the compost produced by compost bins and ecosan
    latrines and survey on knowledge attitudes and practices in usage of
    compost bins and ecosan latrines”
Finland,
Kenya, Ghana, Burkina Faso,

Sri Lanka

5 CHALLENGES IN IMPLEMENTING ECOLOGICAL
SANITATION
  • “Evaluation of social and cultural acceptance of the
    biotoilet system”
  • “Social representattions of hygiene and excretes disposal -
    The case of ecological dry toilets introduction in Quibdo and
    Tumaco-Columbia”
  • “Towards a common goal. The challenges of the sanitation
    sector in Zambia”
  • “Living with the marginalised: Addressing the
    socio-economic and cultural aspects in implementing Oka-Dry Toilets in
    Madimba; case of Lusaka”
  • Sari Huuhtanen*, Finland; Michelo Katambo, Zambia:
  • “The challenge of social change; experiences from Zambia
    dry-sanitation project (ZASP, 2006-2008)”
Mexico,
Columbia, Zambia
6 GENDER ASPECTS
RELATED TO DRY SANITATION
  • “Gender aspects of ecological sanitation with urine
    diverting dry toilets”
  • “Female local latrine builders: Contributing towards
    objectives of International Year of Sanitation, 2008″
  • “Women and ecological sanitation”
  • “Promotion of dry toilets for reducing vulnerability for
    the poor women having Islamic and cultural values in urban slums of
    Bangladesh”
Nepal,
Uganda, Bangladesh
7a TECHNICAL
DEVELOPMENT OF DRY TOILETS
  • “Is the
    Agricultural utilisation of Treated Urine and Faces recommendable?”
  • “Developing low cost composting toilet for developing
    countries”
  • “Solar thermal sanitation of human faeces – an affordable
    solution for
    ensuring sustainability of EcoSan activities”
  • “Feasibility assessment of application of onsite volume
    reduction
    system (OVRS) for source-separated urine”
  • “Urban slum dwellers in Kenya and Bangladesh benefit from
    using Peepoo
    bags which are self-sanitising and biodegradable”
Kenya and
Bangladesh and others
7b TECHICAL
DEVELOPMENT OF DRY TOILETS continues
  • “From the outhouse to indoor dry toilets in Finland”
  • “Estimation of water evaporation rate from composting
    toilet”
  • “Implementation of urine-diverting dry toilets in
    multi-storey apartment buildings in Ethiopia”
  • Dry sanitation in multi-story apartment buildings: “The
    case of Dongsheng, Inner Mongolia, China”
  • “The humanure toilet”
Finland,
Ethiopia, Inner Mongolia, China
8 CAPACITY
BUILDING
  • “Going to scale with urine diversion in Sweden – From
    individual households to municipal systems in 15 years”
  • “The processes of adaption during the introducing urine
    diverting toilets in Kyrgyzstan”
  • “Influence of social, cultural, economic and gender aspects
    in dry toilet as eco-sanitation tool. Case study of Sukuma-nomadic
    community in Malinyi, Tanzania.”
  • “Experiences with ecosan systems to provide sustainable
    sanitation for schools in Kenya and India”
  • “Gold Factory – An experimental art project with dry
    toilets”
Sweden,
Kyrgyzstan, Tanzania,Kenya, India
Side event SUSTAINABLE
SANITATION FOR TOURISM AND RECREATION
  • “Toilet provision in the Cairngorms national park,
    Scotland, UK”
  • “Experience of biotoilet installations on Kizhi island,
    Republic of Karelia, Russia”
  • “Promotion of sustainable development of rural communities
    around especially protected natural areas in Kazakhstan”
  • “Public toilets and care practices in nature parks in
    Finland, current situation and recommendations for improvement”
Scotland,
Republic of Karelia, Russia, Kazakhstan, Finland

a look at Biodigesters

Sun, 06Sep2009 1 comment

source: The Appropriate Infrastructure Development Group (AIDG)

Summary: Biodigesters convert organic wastes into a nutrient rich liquid fertilizer and biogas, a renewable source of electrical and heat energy. Their use is widespread in developing countries, particularly India, Nepal, China and Vietnam. Biodigesters help families by providing a cheap source of fuel, preventing environmental pollution from runoff from animal pens, and reducing diseases caused by the use of untreated manure as fertilizer.

Biodigesters produce biogas, an alternative fuel source

As organic wastes break down, whether in the ground, a compost heap or landfill, they release methane (a potent greenhouse gas that traps heat at 23 times the rate of carbon dioxide). A biodigester or biogas system is a waste-management solution that traps methane as it is produced, making it available for heating or cooking or even electricity generation. By preventing methane from venting freely into the atmosphere, these systems can help reduce emissions that contribute to climate change.

Biogas is a sustainable substitute for the propane, kerosene, and firewood that many rural families in developing countries use for their domestic energy needs.  For those families that buy their fuel, a biodigester can save them hundreds of U.S. dollars every year. For those that gather their own firewood, it can reduce a family’s workload (particularly women and girls) and help prevent the deforestation prevalent in many of these areas.

Biodigesters also create high quality fertilizer

Pigs

In addition to providing fuel, these systems offer an environmentally friendly way of treating waste. As waste is processed in a biodigester, it is sterilized by methane-producing bacteria and the high-methane environment; over 90% of protozoa, cysts and disease-causing bacteria, such as E. Coli, are killed. The effluent that remains after gas production is a high quality organic fertilizer that can be safely used on food crops. Some studies have shown that this liquid fertilizer has a higher nutritional value than the feedstock initially put in. Families, for whom AIDG has installed biodigesters, have reported seeing the quality of their crops improve dramatically after only one year of using biodigester fertilizer.

The Good:

Biodigesters:

  • Provide clean and renewable energy. Families use less firewood, decreasing deforestation, save money and have accessible fuel.
  • Reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The combustion of biogas produces lower greenhouse gas emissions than typical methane emissions from a waste lagoon or septic system.
  • Reduce contamination of surface water, groundwater and other resources.
  • Reduce odors and pathogens. Biodigesting sewage can reduce the parasitic and pathogenic bacterial counts by over 90%.
  • Convert waste into high quality organic fertilizer. Families can obtain improved crop yields and save money.
  • Can accommodate a wide variety of organic wastes including animal manure, night soil, crop stalks, straw, slaughterhouse wastes, biodegradable garbage and wastewater.

While waste needs to be added and effluent removed on a daily basis, biodigesters are typically very reliable systems that require little maintenance.

The Bad:

Biodigesters function poorly in colder climates unless an external heat source is applied. The methanogenic bacteria responsible for generating biogas require temperatures well above freezing (optimal temperature ranges – mesophilic: 30-40°C; thermophilic: 50-60°C), so biodigesters are not ideal in cooler areas.

In order to keep the anaerobic digestion process going continually, biodigesters require a daily amount of work and a consistent source of organic materials:

  • Each day, the waste to be added needs to be mixed with water and/or ground to a liquid state. Manure is naturally manure is water-soluble, but kitchen scraps, such as banana and orange peels need to be ground into smaller which can be time consuming.
  • Each day, the biodigester effluent needs to be removed from the effluent tank.

Biogas provides 20% more energy than if dung/wastes were burned directly, but much less compared to fuels such as propane and natural gas.

The Bottom Line:

Biodigesters are an excellent technological solution for families and farmers that want a combined sanitation and energy solution, who can manage the daily feeding required to produce adequate biogas, and who have use for lots of fertilizer.  more…

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