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Archive for the ‘diarrhoea’ Category

Where do yo shit by @WaterForPeple

Tue, 14Jan2014 Comments off

Great video! by Water For People, sure there are a lot of little details not mentioned, but you can not do better for a 5 minute video.

Paper: Estimating child health equity potential of improved sanitation – Nepal

Tue, 24Sep2013 Comments off

paper

Conceptual framework for using LiST to estimate the lives saved from WSS interventions  Acharya et al. BMC Public Health 2013 13(Suppl 3):S25   doi:10.1186/1471-2458-13-S3-S25 Anjali Acharya,  Li Liu, Qingfeng Li and Ingrid K Friberg

Department of International Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA

Estimating the child health equity potential of improved sanitation in Nepal

Abstract

Background

Access to improved sanitation plays an important role in child health through its impact on diarrheal mortality and malnutrition. Inequities in sanitation coverage translate into health inequities across socio-economic groups. This paper presents the differential impact on child mortality and diarrheal incidence of expanding sanitation coverage across wealth quintiles in Nepal.

Methods

We modeled three scale up coverage scenarios at the national level and at each of the 5 wealth quintiles for improved sanitation in Nepal in the Lives Saved Tool (LiST): equal for all quintiles, realistically pro-poor and ambitiously pro-poor.

Results

The results show that equal improvement in sanitation coverage can save a total of 226 lives (10.7% of expected diarrhea deaths), while a realistically pro-poor program can save 451 child lives (20.5%) and the ambitiously pro-poor program can save 542 lives (24.6%).

Conclusions

Pro-poor policies for expanding sanitation coverage have the ability to reduce population level health inequalities which can translate into reduced child diarrheal mortality.  more….

New Paper: Environmental & Sanitation Practices Among Diarrhoeal Patients India

Thu, 19Sep2013 Comments off

new paper

Reema Kumari(1), JV Singh(2)

1 Associate Professor,2 Prof. and Head Department of Community Medicine & Public Health, King Georges Medical University, Lucknow

njmsonline.org  – National Journal of Medical and Allied Sciences [NJMS]

ENVIRONMENTAL AND SANITATION PRACTICES AMONG DIARRHOEAL PATIENTS ADMITTED AT INFECTIOUS DISEASE HOSPITAL, LUCKNOW

Abstract

Introduction Diarrhoeal diseases are leading causes of mortality and morbidity in developing countries. Inspite of many programmes and facilities provided by the government towards prevention of diarrhoeal diseases, it continues to be a threat.
Objective: To study the sanitation and hygiene practices followed by patients of diarrhoea admitted at Infectious Disease Hospital (IDH).

Methodology: A descriptive cross sectional hospital based study conducted on 300 patients admitted at Infectious Diseases Hospital, King George’s Medical University, Lucknow. Patients were interviewed using a predesigned schedule after taking informed consent. Information regarding general characteristics including source of drinking water, sanitation practices, toilet facility available and mode of refuse disposable were taken. Data was analysed using SPSS 17.0 statistical software. Results: Majority (50.67%) of patients’ uses Municipal water supply/tap water as main source of drinking water and 30% patients uses India mark II hand pump. Around two-third of diarrhoeal patient practices hand washing with soap and water after household activities. Majority (63.33%) do not practices safe methods of storing drinking water, 87.33% uses sanitary latrines while 12.6% still uses open field for defecation. Almost half of the patients uses dustbin for refuse disposal. Use of sanitary latrines and India mark II drinking water was positively associated with higher socioeconomic status. Conclusion: In spite of the improved facilities of water and sanitation provided by the government, there exists a lacuna between its availability and their proper utilisation. This leads on to the burden of diarrhoeal patients on the health sector. Proper awareness regarding safe drinking water and sanitation practices and proper refuse disposal can reduce the diarrhoeal load.  view pdf…

WASHLink  from time to time likes to briefly note newly publish papers in hopes of giving  them a wider audience – let us know if you know of paper that could use this very small piece of publicity…

 

new paper: non-clinical interventions for preventable & treatable childhood diseases – what do we know?

Thu, 19Sep2013 1 comment

new paper: by  Maureen Seguin  and Miguel Niño-Zarazúa

United Nations University,

Munich Personal RePEc Archive

13. September 2013

“What do we know about non-clinical interventions for preventable and treatable childhood diseases in developing countries?”

Abstract:

Preventable and treatable childhood diseases, notably acute respiratory infections and diarrhoeal diseases are the first and second leading causes of death and morbidity among young children in developing countries. The fact that a large proportion of child deaths are caused by these diseases is symptomatic of dysfunctional policy strategies and health systems in the developing world. Though clinical interventions against such diseases have been thoroughly studied, non-clinical interventions have received much less attention. This paper contributes to the existing literature on child wellbeing in two important respects: first, it presents a theory of change-based typology that emerges from a systematic review conducted on non-clinical interventions against preventable and treatable childhood diseases. Second, it pays particular attention to policies that have been tested in a developing country context, and which focus on children as the primary target population. Overall, we find that improved water supply and quality, sanitation and hygiene, as well as the provision of medical equipment that detect symptoms of childhood diseases, along with training and education for medical workers, are effective policy instruments to tackle diarrhoeal diseases and acute respiratory infections in developing countries. more…

34 page pdf

Seguin, Maureen and Niño-Zarazúa, Miguel (2013): What do we know about non-clinical interventions for preventable and treatable childhood diseases in developing countries? Published in: WIDER Working Paper Series , Vol. 2013, No. 087 (13. September 2013)

WASHLink  from time to time likes to briefly note newly publish papers in hopes of giving  them a wider audience – let us know if you know of paper that could use this very small piece of publicity…

Toilet Revolution: Shyama V. Ramani at TEDxMaastricht

Mon, 16Sep2013 Comments off

This is one of the best Sanitation/ Global Health stories we have seen lately. Delivered in a  very pleasurable consumable format, by a great speaker who make the topic reachable to a board spectrum of professionals and people. It’s antidotal in nature, while being universal in the realities of solving a village’s sanitation issues. Shyama has an honesty that needs to be incorporated into the newly developing transparency practices oft the world’s NGOs . This talk needs to be shown to the NGO’s and their altruistic “minions” before they venture out to help their global brothers and sisters.

The story starts out after audience imagining life with out toilets with Shyama explaining how she as pure novice, walks into a coastal village after a tsunami, and realizes she must bring the villages toilets back.

She learns along the way  “…2.4 billion people don’t even have access to a toilet that functions, 1 billion don’t have access to any toilet the just have to defecate anywhere they can …” Thus the “….lack of waste management and toilets is making a killer that we are not talking about enough … diarrhea…. the number one killer in most developing countries…”

She Googles and contacts “experts” to educates herself with the facts to get the job done  or so she thinks.

Upon the last new toilet being being initiated with a squat of a villager behind closed doors, Shyama, unlike many of the NGO’s, does not walked away.  The core of her captivating story is what happens afterward … The door is opened, the veil of naivety is exposed and lifted. Where/when most project fall into failure, she and her partner begins the long diagnostic/prognostic/improvement cycle.

Shyama  reminds us it is a an effort that is ongoing with more to learn and invites us to come back… It will be a crime if we do not see the next installment of this story as it continues to unfold.

Essential and very practical points abound within her story. One that are be showing up in other stories from around the world- and  hopepfully becoming a  din that must be addressed. With some paraphrasing, here are a few I see tucked in her tail:
1 NGO’s can’t do it alone and succeed; the villagers are needed – with a vastly redefined roll for NGOs.
2 Technical experts/ engineers may not be the social experts – both are needed.
3 Toilets at the onset are not alway seen as valuable/desirable assets. Education is needed before during and after
4 Women and men of the villages do not have the same perspective on sanitation. The project must address both separately as well as together .
5 Villages without ongoing support services will quickly have “…fossils of abandoned stinking toilets allover…”
6 Schools as an institution do not just naturally promote and desire ecosan toilets. They must also be nurtured. (details not addressed in this piece – but would be important to learn more about)
7 Building heathy social stimulus/pressure/ pride must be part of the scope
8 People who want the toilet must be educated on use and care
9 The villagers must be part of the economic model – the social model. Such pieces as manufacturing / construction/ distribution/ sales/ support / education/ promotion/ etc
10 Microfinance is a viable solution – (a work in progress in the story)
11 Toilets can provide a financially valuable natural resource – fertilizer
12 This all makes it a slower road, but it is a viable road, unlike the fast road the many NGO’s are building.
13 100% may be the target but  80% is a not a bad number to start with- and even that require lots of work.

Shyama  reminds us it’s a an effort that is ongoing and invites us to come back ,so to speak.  It will be a crime if we do not see the next installment of this story as it continues to unfold.

 

Rose George: Let’s talk crap. Seriously: 2013 TED TALK available now!

Tue, 16Apr2013 Comments off

Mapping Sanitation: a Tedx Talk by Faisal Chohan, a Senior TED Fellow

Fri, 22Mar2013 1 comment

A quick 90 second video about an effort to map sanitation  in Rawalpindi Pakistan

Faisal Chohan, a Senior TED Fellow and TEDxIslamabad organizer, will now continue his mapping work with a related mission: Improving sanitation in order to prevent the spread of cholera—a bacterial infection in the small intestine, primarily caused by drinking water or eating food that has been contaminated by feces of an infected person. The rapid dehydration and electrolyte imbalance that results from cholera can lead to death if left untreated. Read more on TEDx….

 

Releated links

Other useful links

Scaling out Sanitation in Rawalpindi, Pakistan  2009 article by Pakistan Institute for Environment-Development Action Research (PIEDAR).

About TedxCity.2.0

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In the tradition of our TEDxYouthDay, TEDxChange, and TEDxWomen initiatives, comes TEDxCity2.0: A day of urban inspiration. 28 TEDx communities around the world participated in TEDxCity2.0 day on October 13, 2012.  We will host our next event in 2013 to share the powerful narratives of urban innovators and organizers, stewards and artists, builders and tastemakers. The TEDx platform will harness the power of people across the globe to encourage them to host a TEDx event, themed “City 2.0.  source & more…

 

A good read: The roots of inaction: Understanding and overcoming the obstacles to greater investment in scaling-up effective diarrhea treatment

Tue, 21Aug2012 Comments off

I urge you to read the  PLoS Blog  post by Oliver Sabot. While ORS is not the the end game,   ORS is unquestionably crutial in the ability to get to the end game : WASH /WATSAN for all.

The roots of inaction: Understanding and overcoming the obstacles to greater investment in scaling-up effective diarrhea treatment

By PLoS Guest Blogger
Posted: August 20, 2012

“”In the second of two posts guest blogger Oliver Sabot from the Clinton Health Access Initiative reflects on the challenge and opportunity of scaling-up access to effective treatment for diarrhea, the second largest cause of child mortality globally. The posts …”

Webinar:Why does diarrhea matter? Lessons from Countries

Wed, 15Aug2012 Comments off

August 7, 2012 — MCHIP

Please join CORE Group and MCHIP for the second in a series of webinars on diarrheal disease.

WHEN: August 21st from 9 – 11 am EST

HOW: Join by registering at CORE Group’s website [2]

WHO: Moderated by Dr. Dyness Kasungami, MCHIP Team Leader for Child Health

DESCRIPTION:
The second leading cause of preventable child deaths, diarrheal disease claims the lives of 1.3 million children under-five annually, mostly in Africa and South Asia. Gains from the introduction of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) and improved water, sanitation and hygiene are have not been sustained in many countries, with global coverage of ORT use being as low as 34%.

The first webinar in February focused on advocating for coordinated approaches to implement a package of effective interventions, and mobilizing resources and multi-disciplinary partners. In this second webinar, Dr. Dyness Kasungami will moderate a panel with three speakers who will present country success experiences  from Benin, Ghana and India in addressing low coverage of effective interventions in diarrheal disease.

The panelists will also share lessons learned surrounding promising practices to increase coverage of zinc, changed dynamics around ORS/zinc use, and the links between treatment and key Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) practices for prevention. The panel presentation will be followed by an opportunity for a Q&A with participants.

PANELISTS:
Katharine McHugh is the WASH Technical Advisor at PSI.
Topics: Diarrhea treatment program in Benin; strengthening linkages between ORT/zinc and WASH

Kate Schroder is the Director of Essential Medicines Initiative of Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI).
Topic: Demand generation for ORS and zinc in India

Vicki MacDonald is the Child Health Advisor of Abt Associates.
Topic: A public/private partnership in Ghana to address the introduction of zinc

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