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Waterless Urinals: A Resource Book

Thu, 21Feb2013 Comments off

This is a Wonderful 39 page  Technical document  on covering  all aspect  of Waterless Urinals and some variants that incorporates
the core ideas.

 waterless urinal

written by

  • Dr V M Chariar
  • S Ramesh Sakthivel

from forward

This Resource Book is a guide that seeks to assist individuals, builders, engineers, architects, and policy makers in promoting waterless urinals and the benefits of harvesting urine for reuse through waterless urinals and urine diverting toilets.

Chapters cover a wide set of Waterless Urinals details

  1. Waterless Urinals
    1. 1.1  Advantages of Waterless Urinals and Reuse of Urine
    2. 1.2  Demerits of Conventional Urinals
  2. Functioning of Waterless Urinals
    1. 2.1  Sealant Liquid Traps
    2. 2.2  Membrane Traps
    3. 2.3  Biological Blocks
    4. 2.4  Comparative Analysis of Popular Odour Traps
    5. 2.5  Other Types of odour Traps
    6. 2.6  Installation and Maintenance of Waterless Urinals
  3. Innovative Urinal Designs
    1. 3.1  Public Urinal Kiosk 21
    2. 3.2  Green Waterless Urinal
    3. 3.3  Self Constructed Urinals
  4. Urine Diverting Toilets
  5. Urine Harvesting for Agriculture
    1. 5.1  Safe Application of Urine 3
    2. 5.2  Methods of Urine Application
  6. Other Applications of Urine
  7. Challenges and the Way Forward
  8. References and Further Reading
The book has a solid collection of tables and diagrams that support the text
  • Comparative analysis of popular odour traps
  • Average chemical composition of fresh urine
  • Recommended dose of urine for various crops
  • Waterless urinals for men
  • Schematic diagram showing functioning of urinals
  • Sealant liquid based odour trap
  • Urinals with sealant liquid based odour traps
  • Flat rubber tube by Keramag and silicon membranes by Addicom
  • LDPE membrane by Shital Ceramics
  • Biological blocks
  • Formwork used for fabrication of public urinal kiosk
  • Reinforced concrete public urinal kiosk
  • Drawing of public urinal kiosk established at IIT Delhi
  • Green urinal established at IIT Delhi
  • Plant bed of green urinal with perforated pipe
  • Drawing of public urinal kiosk established at IIT Delhi
  • Self constructed urinal Eco‐lily
  • Squatting type urine diverting dry toilet with two chambers
  • Urine diverting no mix toilet 27 Sectional view of a urine diverting dry toilet
  • Deep injection of urine using soil injector
  • Deep injection of urine using perforated pet bottles
  • Use of fertilisation tank for applying urine through drip irrigation
  • Manually operated reactor for recovery of struvite
  • Schematic drawing of ammonia stripping from urine
Among many topics the Doc  weighs pros and cons of of traps to prevent odor and gases for escaping .Most of the solutions  have cost / maintenance barriers that limit feasibility to particular set of cases. India is a large county and need a variety of solutions as does the rest of the world.
We will  will  be interested to learn more about Zerodor
“An odourless trap Zerodor which does not require replaceable parts or consumables resulting in low maintenance costs has been developed at IIT Delhi. This model is in final test stage yet to be made commercially available.”    more on Zerodor
further notes from forward

Waterless Urinals do not require water for flushing and can be promoted at homes, institutions and public places to save water, energy and to harvest urine as a resource. Reduction in infrastructure required for water supply and waste water treatment is also a spinoff arising from installing waterless urinals. The concept, founded on the principles of ecological sanitation helps in preventing environmental damage caused by conventional flush sanitation systems.

In recent years, Human Urine has been identified as a potential resource that can be beneficially used for agriculture and industrial purposes. Human urine contains significant portion of essential plant nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphate and potassium excreted by human beings. Urine and faeces can also be separated employing systems such as urine diverting toilets. In the light of diminishing world’s phosphate and oil reserves which determine availability as well as pricing of mineral fertilisers, harvesting urine for reuse in agriculture assumes significant importance. Akin to the movement for harvesting rain water, urine harvesting is a concept which could have huge implications for resource conservation.

Link to download  book & A deeper overview:

with excerpts can be found on the the India Water Portal site  more….

Prepared By

The Bill &Melinda Gates Foundation supports joint project by Swiss aquatic research institute and South African water utility

Fri, 15Oct2010 2 comments

Urine as a Commercial Fertilizer?

14 October 2010 – press release reprint
http://www.eawag.ch/medien/bulletin/20101014/index_EN

In Eawag’s laboratory, process engineer Kai Udert carries out research on various reactors to separate nutrients and contaminants out of urine

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation supports joint project by Swiss aquatic research institute and South African water utility

The separate collection of urine provides innovative opportunities for the improvement of sanitation and the recycling of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. Urine separation is an excellent sanitation solution, particularly in places where classic sewer-based sanitation is not sustainable. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is providing a grant of 3.0 million US dollars to support a joint project by the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (Eawag) and the eThekwini Water and Sanitation utility (EWS) in South Africa to continue developing practical, community-scale nutrient recovery systems.

The project, covering a period of four years, focuses on the further development of technical solutions for urine processing for nutrient recovery. In addition, project participants, together with experts from the University of KwaZulu-Natal and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich, will study the logistics of collection and transport of urine from toilets to processing facilities. The Swiss aquatic research scientists and their partners in South Africa will also examine ways in which sanitation can be paid for by the production and sale of urine-based fertiliser, thus enabling a cheap, efficient and widely-accepted sanitation system to be set up.

Alternatives are urgently needed

There is a growing awareness that in many parts of the world an alternative is needed for the conventional sewer-based sanitation and central wastewater treatment system – if only for the reason that not enough water is available for drinking, let alone to be used for flushing. There is a pressing need to reduce the number of people with no access to basic sanitary facilities and safe drinking water, as required by the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). As well as endangering people’s health, inadequate disposal of faecal material poses a risk to the drinking water supply and contaminates the natural environment. Last but not least, the global demand for fertiliser is so great that interest in local sources of nutrients is growing.

Successful preparatory work in Nepal

Eawag has many years of experience in the research of urine separation, also known as NoMix technology, and in 2007 completed the transdisciplinary Novaquatis project. Since then, Eawag’s project in Siddhipur near Kathmandu, Nepal, has demonstrated that urine processed to make the phosphorus-based fertiliser struvite can help to close regional nutrient cycles and promote awareness of the value of the nutrients contained in urine. Farmers participating in the scheme also benefit since they do not need to buy as much imported chemical fertiliser (www.eawag.ch/stun). «This experience plus the collaboration with an extremely progressive administrative department in Durban were important reasons for developing our project in South Africa for the next four years», says process engineer Kai Udert, who is the Eawag researcher in charge of the South Africa project.

Collaboration with an innovative water authority

Eawag can count on a forward-looking partner in the South African eThekwini region around Durban, since they have already carried out important pioneering work in the field of sanitation. EWS has been promoting urine-diverting dry toilets since 2002 and there are already around 90,000 such toilets in use. However, urine is simply soaked into the ground, which could create new problems in the longer term. A simple, combined system for nutrient recycling from urine will be developed . This will reduce the costs of sanitation, prevent pollution of water resources and produce fertiliser for the local market. «That’s a completely new way of thinking and not just a small step on an already well-trodden path», says Kai Udert.

More information: Dr. Kai Udert, Telephone +41 44 823 5360

The effects of urine storage conditions on struvite recovery

Mon, 25Jan2010 Comments off

This Came up in a google news watch  – worthy of noting – originally published in 2006 by Elizabeth  Anne Tilley

Absract:

“Phosphorus, like oil, is a non-renewable resource that must be harvested from finite resources in the earth’s crust. An essential element for life, phosphorus is becoming increasingly scarce, contaminated, and difficult to extract. Struvite, or magnesium ammonium phosphate (MgNH₄P0₄.6H₂0) is a white, crystalline phosphate mineral that can be used as a bioavailable fertilizer and can be recovered from aqueous solutions such as digestor supernant. In response to diminishing water resources, increasing nutrient pollution, and largely unaffordable centralized treatment, a paradigm of Ecological Sanitation (EcoSan) has emerged. A central tenant of EcoSan technology is nutrient recovery; by separating urine from feces in the absence of water, urine can be used as a clean, concentrated nutrient source. Urine harvested in this manner is used as a liquid fertilizer with varying degrees of success and acceptance. This research examines the potential of urine to be a feedstock for struvite recovery. By recovering a sustainable source of phosphorus from urine, the prospect of appropriate sanitation and closed-loop nutrient systems, may move closer to reality. In laboratory experiments using synthetic and real human urine, different methods of preparing urine to be used as a feedstock for struvite recovery, were examined. The effect of temperature, faecal contamination, dilution, and headspace on stored nutrient levels was examined. The effect of adding different quantities of magnesium, at different times, on the amount of phosphorus that could be removed from solution, was also examined. An average of 70% of phosphorus could be removed from real urine in the form of struvite when magnesium was added to the urine solution after ureolysis had forced the precipitation of calcium and magnesium minerals; magnesium added before ureolysis began retarded the process. Dilution and the presence of wastewater were found to affect the rate of ureolysis but not the purity of the struvite recovered; recovered struvite was approximately 99% pure regardless of dilution or contamination. Based on a comparison of the results, synthetic urine was found to be representative of the general behaviour of real urine during struvite formation.”

download link is VERY slow:  ubc_2006-0678.pdf

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